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Orca Whales

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Mica Thompson

on 25 April 2016

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Transcript of Orca Whales

Orca Whales
Distribution
Pods
Three "subspecies" of Orcas
History
Mica Thompson
Orcinus Orca
Basic Facts Continued
Dialect
Basic Facts
Age, Size, and Weight

Male
- 20-26 feet long and weigh 8,000 to 12,000 lbs
Female
- 16-23 feet long and weigh 3,000 to 6,000 lbs
Calves
- 7-8 feet and 400 lbs at birth
Physical Features
Coloration
Dolphin Family
Pectoral Fins
Saddle patch

Anatomy
Northwest Native Art
Orcas in Captivity
-Fear of Orcas gave them their nickname "Killer Whale"
- Big fishing competitor
-Orcas were often hunted for meat and oil supply
- Natives viewed Orcas with high respect
- Massive amounts of orcas were caught for captivity
-Whale watching has become major tourist acitivity

Sources
Pictures
http://9f1780.medialib.glogster.com/media/e07a1dcc23d4a5e320f1d32dbb3d3cfe7f5b212dc2dcca6c7f52468ebc26c056/orca-distribution.png
http://www.hww.ca/assets/images/mammals/killer-whale/killer_whales_map.jpg
http://blog.chron.com/fromunderthebridge/files/2013/07/Blackfish.Captive.KillerWhales-600x412.jpg
http://www.orca-live.net/card/images/fig.gif
http://www.pathgallery.com/images/products/Hunt,_Tony_Orca_900_txt_550.jpg
http://blog.seattlepi.com/candacewhiting/files/2011/05/2011WhaleWheel20x20finalscaled.png
http://www.pathgallery.com/images/products/Amos_Patrick_Killerwhale_700_txt_550.jpg
http://www.orcasound.net/
Behavior
Sexual Maturity and Breeding
http://www.ieet.org/images/uploads/killer-whale_breaching_thumb.jpg
Ford, J. K. B., Ellis, G. M., & Balcomb, K. C. (2000). Killer whales: The natural history
and genealogy of Orinus orca in British Columbia and Washington. Vancouver: UBC Press.

Kriete, B., & Puget Sound Nearshore Partnership. (2007). Orcas in Puget Sound.
Olympia, Wash: Puget Sound Nearshore Partnership.

Pryor, K., & Norris, K. S. (1991). Dolphin societies: Discoveries and puzzles. Berkeley:
University of California Press.

Yates, S. (1992). Orcas, eagles & kings: Georgia Strait & Puget Sound. Boca Raton, Fla:
Primavera Press.

- Active, social and intellectual
- Breach, flip, side rolling
- Like to play with their food
-Females- Sexual mature at age 15
- Gestation period- 13 to 15 months
- Average females has 3-5 calves
in their lifetime
-Males- sexually mature at age 25
-Use their dorsal fin for mating
Residents
- Matriarchal
- Feed on fish
- Travel in pods of 10-75
Transients
- Travel in smaller groups
- Feed on marine mammals
- Less stable family bonds
Offshore
- Rarely seen
- Feed on fish and mammals
J-Clan
- Can be found in all oceans
- Pacific Northwest Orcas are most closely watched
- Population is healthy and stable
- Estimation between 30,000 to 80,000
- Each pod has unique calls in terms of pitch and pattern
- Dialects are passed down generations
- Rapid clicks are used for echolocation and sonar signals for navigation
- Socializing sounds are squeals, whistles and squawks
- Each population speaks extremely different dialects that are easily distinguishable
Full transcript