Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM


Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.


Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Everglades National Park

No description


on 14 May 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Everglades National Park

Cultural Affiliation
Late 1800's
Florida was known as a hunting community & used the Everglades as a primary hunting site (History & Culture)
Booming metropolitan area meant resources from the Everglades needed to be harvested and drained (History & Culture)
Everglades National Park

Cascadia Community College Class Project
By: Jordan Peterson
Everglade Today: continued
The park supports 350 species of birds, 300 fish, 400 mammals, and 50 reptiles (Donna Micari)
The park raises hundreds of thousands of dollars a year for animal preservation (Donna Micari)
Everglades Importance
The Everglade national park is very important because it protects hundreds of animals and plants from going extinct (Donna Micari)
By doing this the park helps preserve the earths history (Donna Micari)
Culture Affiliation Continued
Early 1900's
Florida Gov. Jennings bans hunting in the Everglades to preserve endangered animals (History & Culture)
This was unsuccessful because it was a drastic change in the hunting community
In 1928, Earnest Coe, a landscape architect, began trying to make the Everglades a national park to protect the land & its ecosystem (History & Culture)
It took 19 years for the park to gather enough support and funding to receive a National Park title (History & Culture)
Everglade Park: Today
The Everglades protects 36 endangered species including the Florida Panther, American Crocodile, and the West Indian Manatee (Everglades national Park)
Resources were used to farm and develop suburban communities
The Everglade National Park was established on December 6, 1947 (History & Culture)
Why Everglade National Park is at Risk:
The national is threatened by the growing metropolitan areas of South Florida because water from the park is diverted from the park to help run the cities (Donna Micari)
Sense the late 1800 drainage and development attempts were made, less than 50% of the parks ecosystem remains intact (Donna Micari)
Also do to the growing human population in South Florida, the boarders of the park are being threatened (Donna Micari)
How to Get Involved
There are many ways to get involved when it comes to helping the Everglades National Park
You can volunteer, Make donations to the park, partener with the national park service, and do what you can to reduce your carbon footprint (Get Involved)
One way to reduce your carbon footprint is by taking the bus to the park instead of driving (get Involved
Another way is by recycling as much as possible (Get Involved)
Works Cited
“Everglades National Park History & Culture.” National Park Service.
May 14, 2014. www.nps.gov/ever/historyculture/index.htm

“U.S. National Park Service Get Involved.” National Park Service.
April 25, 2014. www.nps.gov/getinvolved/index.htm

Micari, Donna. 1998. "Everglades National Park". Cortlandt
Forum. 11 (11).

Everglades National Park (Agency : U.S.). 1990. National parks and
preserves of South Florida. S.l: Everglades National Park.

Full transcript