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Y7 Reproduction - KS3 Science

Puberty - Reproductive Organs - Sex & Fertilisation - Pregnancy - Giving Birth - Menstruation - Reproduction in Animals
by

J Amuah-Fuster

on 8 July 2016

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Transcript of Y7 Reproduction - KS3 Science

Y7 Reproduction
L5: Pregnancy
development and growth of the fetus
L1: Changes
Produce a problem page of your own for young people going through puberty.
L2: Reproductive Organs
L4: Sex & Fertilisation

Be able to describe the physical and emotional changes that take place during adolescence.
Be able to name the human sex cells and state where each is produced.
Lesson Objectives
Discuss in groups how each other has changed,
physically
and
emotionally
in their lifetimes so far.

Write your ideas on sugar paper
LETS SHARE OUR IDEAS!!
Cut and rearrange the keywords to describe their meaning
Use some of these
keywords
in your response:
Puberty
Hormones
Skin
Recently, I seem to have developed red spots all over my face. I'm too ashamed to go out and I don't know what they are or what to do about them. Please help!
What could you say to this person?
Use scientific knowledge in your answer.
My Dilemma!
Homework
Boys
Girls
L6: Giving Birth
L7: Menstruation
Pregnancy in Animals
Be able to recognise the structure of human male and female reproductive organs.
Be able to describe the functions of the human reproductive organs
Be able to explain how sperm and egg cells are adapted for their function.
Be able to state that sex cells contain half the genetic information and are called gametes.
Be able to explain why sperm cells are kept outside the body
Lesson Objectives
Worksheet B4b/3
“Question Box”
Egg and Sperm
Questions
In small groups draw 2 outlines of the human body.
On one draw on the
female reproductive organs
and on the other draw on the
male reproductive organs
– as you understand them!
Label the diagram fully
.
Pupils feedback
Structures and functions of the reproductive parts
Where are sperm and eggs are produced?
How is each sex cell adapted for its function?
Add annotations to the diagrams to explain function of each structure.
male
female
Prostate gland
Bladder
Urethra
This is where sperm are made.
Sperm contain genetic information from the male.
Where will boys produce sperm as they go through puberty?
Testes (or testicles)
Where will girls release eggs from as they go through puberty?
Ovaries
Extended Learning Outcomes
Be able to describe that the
fertilised
egg
divides
into 2,4,8 etc cells as it passes down the fallopian tube.
Be able to state that male & female
nuclei
contain the
genetic information
of the parents.
Be able to describe how the egg and sperm are brought together.
Be able to state that
fertilisation
involves the
fusion
of an egg & sperm cell, and that it takes place in the
fallopian

tube
.
Lesson Objectives
Complete W/S B4c/1 and “Ovulation, Fertilisation and Implantation Sheet”
How did the sperm get from where they were made to their destination?
Fertilisation
involves
fusing
of nuclei, and is followed by
division
of the fertilised egg (
zygote
) and its journey to uterus for
implantation
.
What is fertilisation?
What would be a better explanation?
This is a tube that delivers the sperm into the vagina.
It is also used during excretion to remove urine from the bladder.
This is a skin covering to protect the testicles.
This become erect and is inserted into the vagina during sexual intercourse.
The sperm will travel along the urethra inside during ejaculation.
Makes a fluid that is slightly alkaline to neutralise the acidic conditions of the vagina, helping the sperm survive for longer. It is released during ejaculation.
This gland produces a fluid to help the sperm swim more easily once they have entered the vagina. It is released during ejaculation.
This is the tube the sperm travel along from the testes during the ejaculation stage of sexual intercourse.
A muscular organ containing a lining that can accept a
fertilised
egg cell (zygote).
It will help the zygote attach its placenta, and develop it into an embryo, foetus, then a baby.
The muscle contracts during childbirth to push the baby out.
Barrier between the uterus and the vagina.
Contains an acid mucus plug to prevent sperm or microbes entering.
Opens during a period to allow menstrual blood to leave the uterus.
Accepts the penis during sexual intercourse.
Allows a path for the menstrual blood to leave during a period.
Contains immature eggs.
Each month, one egg matures and is released from the ovary
Also called the Oviduct, it transports a mature egg from the ovary to the uterus.
Successful fertilisation usually happens here, in the fallopian tube.
Complete the questions at the bottom of each diagram
Reproductive System Wordsearch
Draw and label an egg cell and a sperm cell.
Worksheet B4c/3
or
“Ovulation, Fertilisation and Implantation Sheet”
Homework
Learning Objectives
Describe what happens to the fertilised egg (
zygote
) after fertilisation
Describe the structure and function of the
amnion
and
amniotic fluid
.
Describe the role of the
placenta
.
Know how
harmful substances
can affect the development of the fetus.
After fertilisation...
32-38 weeks
Day 2-4
Day 1
Blastocyst
At this stage, cells start to specialise (they begin to change into different types of cells).
Each cell type will have a different role, e.g. the outer cells will help from the placenta
Late Embyro
The embryo has specialised to the point where we can make out different parts of what will be a baby, e.g.; the eyes, heart, brain and spinal cord, umbilical cord, and small stubs that will be limbs
Fetus
The fetus has many more of the features we associate with babies. They have developed full limbs with fingers and toes, ears and nose have taken shape and the brain has grown much larger. Internal organs (lungs, liver, kidneys, etc) are also developing.
Baby
At this stage the baby is fully developed and is ready to be delivered.
The baby may spend the next few weeks developing further, but it can't wait too long otherwise there will be difficulties during delivery
The Zygote
The egg has just been fertilised by the sperm.
The cell has genetic material (DNA) from both its mother and father.
Morula (very simple embryo)
The zygote has undergone cell division.
Each cell divides into two each time.
From one (1) cell, two (2) cells are made, then four (4) cells, then eight (8) cells, and so on.
7-10 weeks
3-4 weeks
Day 5-7
How does a baby breathe without lungs?
From
mother
to
baby
The developing baby will need things from the mother to be able to grow and develop in a healthy way.
These are:
Harmful substances
The
placenta
acts as a
useful

barrier.
From
baby
to
mother
The developing baby needs to remove waste products from processes such as respiration and digestion. These are:
Lesson Objectives
Be able to describe the process of birth.
Be able to state the role of the mammary glands in providing nutrients and some protection from infection.
Be able to write an information leaflet for pregnant women, providing helpful information on healthy pregnancy, birth and care of the baby.
Discuss what information would be useful to include in this leaflet.
Be able to describe complications which can occur during birth.
Be able to explain why breast feeding offers baby protection against some infections
Write
and
illustrate
information leaflet.
Plan your information leaflet, considering what information you will include in each section.
Complete Worksheets B4e/2 and B4e/3
Your task is to produce an
information leaflet
for pregnant women.
Giving birth
What happens during childbirth?
Pregnancy Leaflet
If there is time you may start to write your leaflet.
Homework
Extended Learning Outcomes
At full term (38-42 weeks), the fetus is fully grown and moves into a suitable position for birth.
The
first stage
of birth is the signal that the fetus is ready to be born. The mucus plug in the cervix softens and may trickle out. The amnion will split and the amniotic fluid may gush or trickle out.
Contraction cycles
Once the cervix has
dilated
(widened) enough (10cm), the crown of the fetus' head will start to push through the cervix and birth canal (vagina) with each contraction.
Once the head has made its way through, the shoulders are the next challenge (they have to twist around to exit).
After this, the rest of the body slips out.
With the baby finally out, the hardest part is over, but there is still the last stage to come.
The mother may experience
contractions
(
uterus wall muscle
contracts
) at this point. These act to
push
the fetus downwards.
Before the baby can survive outside the mother, the
ability to breathe
is checked (
sucking liquid out of the airways or slap on the bottom
), and the
umbilical cord
is
clamped and cut
.
It's been a busy day...!
Be able to state that eggs are released from the ovaries at regular (monthly) intervals.
Be able to state that menstruation occurs once a month, and stops during pregnancy.
Be able to explain why menstruation happens.
Be able to describe the role of hormones in the menstrual cycle.
Learning Objectives
Extended Learning Outcomes
What happens if an egg is NOT fertilised?
The menstrual cycle
Complete the Menstrual Cycle Worksheet
Complete this worksheet
?Question Box?
'Taboo' revision game
Am I pregnant?
Hormones
There are
three

main hormones
that control menstruation in females,
FSH
,
Oestrogen
and
LH
.
Hormones are
chemicals
produced by
glands
and released into the
bloodstream
. Hormones are chemical
messengers
, taking messages and instructions from one part of the body to another (or many other parts).
FSH (Follicle Stimulating Hormone)
is made in the brain and instructs the ovaries to begin maturing an egg follicle.
LH (Luteinising Hormone)
is released from the brain and tells the ovary to release a mature egg into the fallopian tube.
Oestrogen

is produced by the ovaries, when an egg follicle is maturing. Oestrogen tells the uterus lining to grow and thicken. It also tells the brain to release LH.
Using
research materials
(e.g. box of books from library, reliable online sources) produce
posters/information leaflets

comparing reproduction in 3 different animals
.
Be able to describe reproduction in a variety of different animals
Be able to draw comparisons between reproduction in humans and reproduction in different animals
Learning Objectives
MAMMALS
REPTILES
FISH
MARSUPIALS
BIRDS
AMPHIBIAN
RESEARCH TASK
Ovulation
Fertilisation
Uterus Lining
Period
Ovaries
Vagina
Menstruation
Uterus
Hormones
Glands
Choose three words in secret. Your challenge is to get your partner to guess your word without using any part of the word itself!
Comparison should include:
Internal/external fertilisation
Number of offspring
Feeding and parental care
Gestation period (duration of pregnancy)
Sweat
Oil
Dirt
Soap
Ovaries start to release eggs
Underarm hair grows
Periods begin
Pubic hair grows
Hips get wider
Breasts develop
Testes start to make sperm
Voice deepens
Hair grows on face, chest and underarms
Shoulders get wider
Pubic hair grows
Testes and penis get bigger
for
swimming
stores energy to
move tail
chemicals help sperm
break into egg
cell
contains
male's DNA
contains
female's DNA
store of energy to
help fertilised egg grow
into an embryo
bladder
bladder
foreskin
foreskin
glands
glands
penis
scrotum
scrotum
testes
sperm duct
sperm duct
urethra
urethra
ovaries
ovaries
fallopian tube
fallopian tube
bladder
uterus
uterus
cervix
cervix
vagina
urethra
vagina
testes
urethra
sperm duct
foreskin
glands
ovaries
fallopian tube
uterus
uterus
cervix
Nucleus
Body
Tail
Head
Cytoplasm (containing egg yolk)
Nucleus
Cell membrane
This can
harm the baby
's development, leading to a
low birth weight
or
organ damage
(e.g. brain, heart)
However, the placenta
cannot stop small molecules
such as
alcohol
and
carbon monoxide
(from smoking cigarettes) from reaching the baby.
This stops the baby from becoming ill.
It prevents
large substances
(like
bacteria
) from passing into the developing baby.
Oxygen
Nutrients (Glucose, Minerals, Vitamins)
Carbon dioxide
Urine
Baby born
in
Amniotic Sac
Video - Giving Birth (animation)
OR for a harder challenge...
An egg is released
The lining breaks down
The lining gets thicker
The lining stays thick
menstruation
ovulation
fertilised
ovaries
vagina
period
blood
Full transcript