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reported speech

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by

tatiana urieles

on 5 October 2012

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Transcript of reported speech

I'm going to the cinema tonight Report Questions YES/NO QUESTION Yes-No questions differ from WH-questions.
These quoted questions begin with auxiliary verb forms such as: is, are, am, do, does, has, have, can, will, must.
They can be answered with "yes" or "no"; hence, they are often called "yes-no questions".
The pronoun whether or if is used to embed (insert) the question clause into the main clause. Reported Speech is when a person says something not exactly.... REPORTED SPEECH Andrea Katia Katia Ana andrea says she is going to the cinema tonight ....And we want to tell it to another person Remember! In english, we can choose to use 'that' or not.
Usually the tense goes back in time:This is called 'Backshifting' Present Continuous
change to
Past Cotinuous Present Simple
change to
Past Simple Past Continuous
change to
Past Perfet Cotinuous Present Perfet
change to
Past Perfet will
change to
would Can
change to
Could Some tense and verb don't change... Past perfect stays Past perfect
Could stays Could
Would stays would
Should stays Should
Might stays Migth TIME WORDS
Direct Speech Reported Speech
today that day now them
yesterday the day before
… days ago … days before
last week the week before
next year the following year
tomorrow the next day / the following day
here there
this that
these thoseType Example
with interrogative direct speech “Why don’t you speak English?”
reported speech He asked me why I didn’t speak English.
without interrogative direct speech “Do you speak English?”
reported speech He asked me whether / if I spoke English.Yes-No questions differ from WH-questions.
These quoted questions begin with auxiliary verb forms such as: is, are, am, do, does, has, have, can, will, must.
They can be answered with "yes" or "no"; hence, they are often called "yes-no questions".
The pronoun whether or if is used to embed (insert) the question clause into the main clause. is used in reported questions, that is, the subject comes before the verb, and it is not necessary to use 'do' or 'did':"Do you speak English?" There is no change in word order.
Verbs 'go back' one tense. There is no do/ did in the reported questions. Type Example
with interrogative direct speech “Why don’t you speak
English?”
reported speech He asked me why I
didn’t speak English.
without interrogative direct speech “Do you speak English?”
reported speech He asked me whether
/ if I spoke English. Direct Speech Reported Speech
What
"What are you looking for? "He asked what I was looking for
Where
"Where can we go tonight?"She asked where they could go that night
When
"When did they go to India?"He asked when they had gone to India
Who
"Who told you that?"He asked me who had told me that
How
"How old are the twins?"He asked how old the twins were
Why
"Why did Carla leave so early?"He asked why Carla had left so early
Which
"Which skirt did you choose?"She asked me which skirt I had chosen
Whose
"Whose dog is missing?"He asked whose dog was missing
is used in reported questions, that is, the subject comes before the verb, and it is not necessary to use 'do' or 'did' This type of question is reported by using 'ask' + 'if / whether + clause "Do you speak English? yes! REPORTED SPEECH
He asked me if I spoke English. Is it raining?" She asked if it was raining.
"Have you got a computer?" He wanted to know whether I had a computer.
"Can you type?" She asked if I could type.
"Did you come by train?" He enquired whether I had come by train.
"Have you been to Bristol before?" She asked if I had been to Bristol before.
Full transcript