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Evaluating Credibility

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by

Brigid Austin

on 12 March 2014

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Transcript of Evaluating Credibility

I can evaluate the credibility of a text, using examples to support my conclusion.
Ask: Is this recent and related?
The three Rs
For every credibility gap there is a gullibility gap. - Richard Cobden
Learning Target:
Credibility
Relevancy
Relevant?
Reputable?
Reliable?
What do these terms mean?
RECENT
Look at the DATE.

The information should be within the last 5 years (unless you are looking at historical data).

RELATED
Is the information connected to YOUR position on the topic?
A website about how to order school uniforms isn't helpful when debating their impact on education.
$1.25
Wednesday, March 12, 2014
Vol XCIII, No. 311
Warm-Up
ASK: Can I trust this source?
Reputable
Who published the article?
Is is an organization such as PBS or a Google site with no author?
Educational organizations and scholarly journals are stronger than sources for the general public (newspapers).
News organizations are stronger than personal sources or places where people post answer (About, Ask, Blogs, etc).

Who wrote the article?
Does the author or organization have authority to speak on your topic?
Do they cite their credentials (PhD, MD, etc.)
Check their job title, job history, educational background, other published writing, motives, affiliations, financial connections, etc.
An article written by an expert has more credibility than one written by a journalist or anonymous author.



Evaluating Credibility
Explain the significance of the quote.
Agenda
Warm-Up
Note-Taking
Rank the Article
Share & Discuss
Quick Check Quiz
Reputable
Examine the presentation of the website.
What is the look & feel of the website?
Are their ADVERTISEMENTS?
Do the links work?
When was it last updated?

Check the web address!!
.com (usually a commercial business)
.org (organization)
.edu (educational institution)
.gov (government)
These alone won’t tell you if the source is valid or not, but they can give you a piece of the puzzle.

Reliable
Is the information truthful?
What evidence is used?
Are sources cited?
Are the sources reputable?
Did the author perform/include facts, stats, etc?

Identify bias
What’s his or her perspective? Is it one-sided?
Does he or she fairly represent all sides of the issue?
Does the author have an emotional or financial connection to the issue?
Who paid for the research or publication for the article?

Let's Practice!
TOPIC: VEGETARIANISM
INDIVIDUAL WORK
Each member of the group will be given an article.
Review the article and determine whether it is credible or not.

GROUP WORK
Discuss your articles and rank them in order from most to least credible.
Be able to defend your thinking.
SAMPLE SOURCE:
PETA

http://www.peta.org/issues/animals-used-for-experimentation/
Full transcript