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Minersville v Gobitus

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Maddie Smith

on 15 December 2017

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Transcript of Minersville v Gobitus

Minersville v Gobitus
(1940)
- students Lillian and William Gobitus expelled
- refused to salute the flag during school
- children believed the gesture was forbidden by command of scripture
- were put into private schools after the incident
- children wrote letter to the school explaining that saluting the flag went against their religious beliefs
-gobitus family was physically attacked some time after the incident
- family grocery store was boycotted
- caused financial stress on the family and the kids stopped attending their private school
Background ( cont. ) :
- the supreme court decided that participation in saluting the flag did not violate the due process of law under the 14th amendment
- the court later overruled the decision
- such mandate denies freedom of speech and religion
Courts Decision:
Background:
Work Cited
http://caselaw.findlaw.com/us-supreme-court/310/586.html
http://billofrightsinstitute.org/educate/educator-resources/lessons-plans/landmark-supreme-court-cases-elessons/minersville-school-district-v-gobitis-1940/
-letter to school board
- the gobitus family
Impact
- the minersville v gobitus case did not directly effect us today. Yes, we have hundreds of people who dont stand during the pledge of allegiance anymore, but their reasoning has nothing to do with this case
Legacy
- the case does not seem to have been a big part of history, if you asked any person walking down the street if they knew what this case was, the answer would most likely be no
Thoughts
- the kids had a right to not stand and salute the flag, if it goes against their religion then their hearts were in the right place when they didnt participate
Thoughts ( cont. )
- expelling the students went against the first amendment, which states that "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof...."
- later this was realized when the court changed their final decison
Full transcript