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Art Nouveau

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natasha panter

on 18 June 2013

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Transcript of Art Nouveau

ART
NOUVEAU

1890-1910
Antoni Gaudi
Architecture
Art, Drawings, and Graphics
Glassware/Stained Glass
and
Furniture
By Natasha Panter
Art Nouveau is an international philosophy and style of art, architecture and applied art—especially the decorative arts, it was most popular from 1890-1910. It was an ornamental style of art that developed first in England and soon spread throughout Europe and the United States. It is characterized by its use of a long, sinuous, organic line and was used most often in architecture, interior design, jewelry and glass design, posters, and illustration. The name Art Nouveau is French for "new art". It was known by different names in different parts of Europe as Jugendstil, in Germany, as Modern in Russia, as Secession in Austria-Hungary and its successor states, as Modernisme in Catalonia (Spain), and, in Italy, as Stile Liberty. It was areaction to academic art of the 19th century, and was inspired by natural forms and structures, not only in flowers and plants but also in curved lines. Architects tried to harmonize with the natural environment. It is also considered a philosophy of design of furniture, which was designed according to the whole building and made part of ordinary life
Character
Art Nouveau acquired distinctly localised tendencies as its geographic spread increased.
Some general characteristics are indicative of the form.
Described as sudden violent curves generated by the crack of a whip
The term "whiplash" is frequently applied to the characteristic curves employed by Art Nouveau artists.
Decorative "whiplash" motifs, formed by dynamic, undulating, and flowing lines in a syncopated rhythm, are found throughout the architecture, painting, sculpture, and other forms of Art Nouveau design.
Artists
Casa Milà
1906-1912
Casa Batlló
1904
Park Güell
1900-1914
Antoni Gaudí was born June 25th 1852 in Reus Catalonia, Spain. He died June 10th 1926 in Barcelona, Spain. Much of Gaudí's work was marked by his big passions in life: architecture, nature, religion. Gaudí studied every detail of his creations, integrating into his architecture a series of crafts in which he was skilled: ceramics, stained glass, wrought ironwork forging and carpentry. He introduced new techniques in the treatment of materials, such as trencadís, made of waste ceramic pieces.
Carlo Bugatti
Bugatti throne chairs
circa 1900
Bugatti's
double-sided desk
circa 1900
The sculptural Cobra chair
1902
Carlo Bugatti was born February 16, 1856 in Milan, Italy. He died April 1940 in Molsheim, France. He was a notable decorator, architect, he never applied his work into buildings, designer and manufacturer of Art Nouveau furniture, models of jewelry, musical instruments. Carlo studied at the Brera Academy and, from 1875, studied at the Académie des Beaux Arts in Paris.
Gustav Klimt
The Kiss
1907-1908
Beethoven Frieze
1902
Portrait of
Adele Bloch-Bauer I
1907
Gustav Klimt was born July 14, 1862 in Baumgarten, Austrian Empire and died February 6, 1918 Vienna, Austria-Hungary. He was an Austrian symbolist painter and one of the most prominent members of the Vienna Secession movement. Klimt is noted for his paintings, murals, sketches, and other objets d'art. Klimt's primary subject was the female body; his works are marked by a frank eroticism. Klimt lived in poverty while attending the Vienna School of Arts and Crafts, where he studied architectural painting until 1883.
Émile Gallé
Émile Gallé was born May 8th 1846 and died on September 23rd 1904 in Nancy, France. He was a French artist who worked in glass, and is considered to be one of the major forces in the French Art Nouveau movement. Gallé was the son of a faience and furniture manufacturer and studied philosophy, botany, and drawing in his youth. He later learned glassmaking at Meisenthal and came to work at his father's factory in Nancy following the Franco-Prussian War. His early work was executed using clear glass decorated with enamel, but he soon turned to an original style featuring heavy, opaque glass carved or etched with plant motifs, often in two or more colours as cameo glass.
Engraved
crystal vase
1900
Lampe
Champignon
1900
Gallé vase
with
lilies and daises
1900
René Lalique
Dragonfly lady
brooch
1882-1890
Horse
1920s
Spirit of
the Wind
1920s
René Jules Lalique was born in the French village of Ay on April 6th 1860, and died May 5t 1945, in Paris France. He was a French glass designer known for his creations of glass art, perfume bottles, vases, jewelery, chandeliers, clocks and automobile hood ornaments. Recognising her son's artistic talent, his mother steered him at the age of 16 to an apprenticeship with the famous Paris jeweler, Louis Aucoc. From 1878-1880 he attended Sydenham Art College in London, and on returning to France, he worked for Aucoq, Cartier, Boucheron and others. In 1882 he became a freelance designer for several top jewellery houses in Paris and four years later established his own jewellery workshop. By 1890, Lalique was recognized as one of France's foremost art nouveau jewellery designers; creating innovative pieces for Samuel Bing's new Paris shop, La Maison de l'Art Nouveau. He went on to be one of the most famous in his field. In 1907 he started a glassware firm, named after him, which still remains successful.
15 WORKS OF ART
Casa Batlló
ANTONI GAUDI
1904
Barcelona, Spain
Snail Room
Carlo Bugatti
1902

The Kiss
Gustav Klimt
1907-1908
Viena, Austria
La Goulue
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec
1888
Paris, France
Tiara
René Lalique
1920s
René Lalique
1956
1956 Rolls-Royce Silver Wraith
glass model
Venetian desk lamp
Louis Comfort Tiffany
1910-1920
New York, New York
Bowl
Louis Comfort Tiffany
1899
New York, New York
Louis Comfort Tiffany
Louis Comfort Tiffany was born February 18, 1848 and died January 17, 1933 in New York, USA. He was an American artist and designer who worked in the decorative arts and is best known for his work in stained glass. He is the American artist most associated with the Art Nouveau. Tiffany was the son of Charles Lewis Tiffany, founder of Tiffany and Company; and Harriet Olivia Avery Young. He attended school at Pennsylvania Military Academy in Chester, Pennsylvania, and Eagleswood Military Academy in Perth Amboy, New Jersey. His first artistic training was as a painter, studying under George Inness and Samuel Colman at the National Academy of Design in New York City in 1866-67 and Léon Bailly in Paris in 1868-69. Tiffany started out as a painter, but became interested in glassmaking from about 1875 and worked at several glasshouses in Brooklyn between then and 1878. In 1879, he joined with Candace Wheeler, Samuel Colman and Lockwood de Forest to form Louis Comfort Tiffany and Associated American Artists. Tiffany's leadership and talent, as well as his father's money and connections, led this business to thrive. In 1881 Tiffany did the interior design of the Mark Twain House in Hartford, Connecticut, which still remains, but the new firm's most notable work came in 1882 when President Chester Alan Arthur refused to move into the White House until it had been redecorated. He commissioned Tiffany, who had begun to make a name for himself in New York society for the firm's interior design work, to redo the state rooms. In 1902, Tiffany became the first Design Director for Tiffany & Co.,
The Blue Room

1890
Girl with Cherry
Blossoms
1882
Stained Glass Lamp
c. 1910
Hôtel Ciamberlani Sgraffite
PAUL HANKAR
1897
Brussels, Belgium
PAVEL SUZOR
1904
St. Petersberg, Russia
Singer House
Ede Magyar
Szeged, Hungary
Ödön Lechner
Budapest, Hungary
Museum of Applied Arts
REÖK Palace
Walter Crane
1893
England
Eugène Grasset
1889
Paris, France
Henri Privat-Livemont
1883-1889
Belgium
Salon des Cent poster
Page from
A Wonder-Book
for Girls and Boys
poster advertising

Absinthe Robette
Bibliography
http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/36571/Art-Nouveau
http://www.dmoz.org/Arts/Art_History/Periods_and_Movements/Art_Nouveau/
http://www.senses-artnouveau.com/
http://exhibitions.europeana.eu/exhibits/show/art-nouveau-en
http://www.gaudidesigner.com/uk/index.html
http://www.casabatllo.es/
http://www.collecting20thcentury.com/articles/Louis-Comfort-Tiffany.html
http://www.achome.co.uk/mission/index.php?page=pictorial_histories&subpage=lctiffany
http://www.gustavstickley.com/tiffanylamp.html
http://edisoneffect.blogspot.ca/2007/12/when-louis-comfort-tiffany-redesigned.html
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