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The Effect of Temperature on Rate of Rust Formation

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by

Kristen Younan

on 2 May 2014

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Transcript of The Effect of Temperature on Rate of Rust Formation

The Effect of Temperature on Rate of Rust Formation
Hypothesis
If the temperature of the air is increased then the rate of reaction will increase as well.
Procedure
1. Open up ConChem 5.05 and then go to the rusting model.
2.Add 40 oxygen molecules and a 19 by 5 iron block (at the bottom of the model)
3. Set temperature to 1 degree Celsius
4. Click "Setup"
5. Start experiment by clicking "Go/Pause"
6. Add three layers of water starting nearest to the first layer of iron molecules.
7. Time for two minutes
8. Along the way, note exactly when a pair of rust molecules have formed. At the end of the run, also note how many total molecules formed.
9. Repeat steps 1-5 for 10, 20, 22 (room temperature), 30, 40, and 50 degrees Celsius.
Data Table
Snapshots of Experiment
1 degree Celsius
Conclusion
We've concluded that as temperature increases, rate of reaction increases. In our model, the lower temperatures of 0-22 degrees Celsius produced no rust molecules within two minutes (0 molecules/min) while the higher temperatures of 30-50 degrees Celsius produced 2-8 rust molecules in two minutes. The run that produced the most rust, 8 molecules in two minutes, (approx. 4 molecules/min) was also the hottest temperature tested of 50 degrees. Also, the 50 degree run was the one to form the rust molecules at the fastest speed. It only took 0.36 seconds for the first pair to be formed. (5.55 molecules/sec) Compared to the 17.33 seconds it took for the first pair of rust to form at 30 degrees, (0.115 molecules/sec) this is a considerable difference. After the formation of the first molecule, all of the reaction rates decreased, but the run at 50 degrees was always the fastest one.
Temperature would also affect the rate of other chemical reactions. As temperature increases, molecules move faster and rate of collision increases. With collisions happening more often, it's also more likely for the reactants to collide in such a way for the reaction to actually take place. (effective collision) Another reason why higher temperature increases rate of reaction is because with faster molecules, there is more kinetic energy that is great enough to break the original bonds between the reactant and itself, and then to form a bond that creates the product. A specific example of a reaction that's sped up by increasing temperature is baking cookies.
10 degrees Celsius
50 degrees Celsius
30 degrees Celsius
40 degrees Celsius
20 degrees Celsius
22 degrees Celsius
Kristen, Selma, Farhan, Mitchell
Number of rust molecules that appeared
Time at which rust molecules appeared
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Graphs
Variables
Independent Variable: Temperature of air
Dependent Variable: Rate of Rust Formation
Constants: Size of box, placement of box, number of oxygen molecules amount of water
1st pair formed
1st pair formed
1st pair formed
1st pair formed
2nd pair formed
3rd pair formed
4th pair formed
2nd pair formed
2nd pair formed
3rd pair formed
Full transcript