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Pie Paragraphs with Rhetorical Analysis Examples 101

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Melody Kowach

on 19 June 2014

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Transcript of Pie Paragraphs with Rhetorical Analysis Examples 101

Pie Paragraphs and Transitions
What does PIE mean?
Point
Point
Should answer the question: How will this paragraph prove my thesis?
Illustration
Transitions
Transitions happen on 2 levels:
Illustration
Explanation
This is usually your topic sentence
Should be related to your thesis statement
This is the "thesis" of your paragraph
These are the subpoints of your paragraph
These help prove your "point"
This is your analysis, comparison, elaboration, or evaluation of the point and illustration given.
Should further elaborate the information to make it clear HOW your illustration proves your point
In rhetorical analysis, the point names the strategy the author used and makes a judgment about how this strategy fulfills the author's purpose and the audience's needs.
For example:
Topic: The use of repetition in Roosevelt's "Pearl Harbor" speech
Point about topic: It creates urgency and appeals to the audience's emotion.
Topic sentence: The use of repetition in Roosevelt's speech creates momentum and appeals to the audience's emotion.
Answers the question: How is the point supported with specific examples, data, experiences, etc.
For Example:
In rhetorical analysis this is your textual evidence, or the evidence from the text that backs up your point about the author's strategy.
1. On the word level : These transitions help your writing move smoothly from sentence to sentence or idea to idea
2. On the sentence level: Sentence transitions help your writing move smoothly from paragraph to paragraph.
Some word transitions include: firstly, secondly, lastly, consequently, clearly, then, furthermore, therefore, additionally, and, in addition, moreover, because, besides that, in the same, way, also, but, however, etc.
Sentence transitions can go at the end of your paragraph or at the beginning of the paragraph. When they are at the beginning of your paragraph, they can go before your topic sentence, or they may be part of the topic sentence.
Some television programs are very informative and can impart a great variety of knowledge to children. __________ Animal Planet teaches children a great deal about the animal kingdom. __________ children get to watch all sorts of animals in action and this is much more exciting than reading about them in books. __________ children get to learn a lot of interesting facts from the History and Science channels. __________ watching television programs is a good way of getting them interested in what they are learning in school.
What transitions can you use in this paragraph?
Some possibilities: Also, furthermore, additionally, in addition, For example, to illustrate, Moreover, Finally, Firstly, Secondly, etc.
How do you write a transition sentence?
1. Identify the topic of the paragraphs that you want to transition
2. Then bridge them with a transition word
3. Or find what they have in common.
For example:
You can create your topic sentence by
identifying the topic
identifying the point about your topic.
**Notice how I've identified the strategy that Roosevelt used, and then I've made my judgement about how the strategy fulfills the author's purpose/ how that strategy is working on the audience.
Your illustration is generally your in-text citation, paraphrase, or summary. It is the EVIDENCE that proves your point.
The use of repetition in Roosevelt's Pearl Harbor speech creates a sense of urgency, appealing to the audience's emotions.
Roosevelt states, "last night, Japanese forces attacked Hong Kong. Last night, Japanese forces attacked Guam." He continues with this repetition, naming a total of four places that Japan attacked "last night."
Explanation
Answers the question: What does the provided illustration mean, or why does it matter?
Without the explanation, a reader can feel overwhelmed with too much information or frustrated because they may not be able to make the connections between your point and your illustrations.
EVERY PIECE OF INFORMATION OR ILLUSTRATION YOU PROVIDE MUST BE EXPLAINED!
Let's look at our FDR Paragraph:
[
point
] The use of repetition in Roosevelt's Pearl Harbor speech creates a sense of urgency, appealing to the audience's emotions. [
signal phrase
] In his speech, ROOSEVELT states, [
illustration
] "last night, Japanese forces attacked Hong Kong. Last night, Japanese forces attacked Guam." [
illustration continues with summary
]He continues with this repetition, naming a total of four places that Japan attacked "last night." [
explanation
] By using the same sentence structure with nearly the same words, the audience hears "last night" over and over again, followed by a different country. With this repetition, Roosevelt illustrates how many places Japan was able to attack in one night, creating a sense of urgency. [
signal

phrase
] Then, Roosevelt punctuates this particular instance of repetition with, [
illustration
] "this morning, the Japanese attacked Midway Island." [
explanation
] He continues to use the same sentence structure, but the slight change of wording is appropriate because not only does it align with the truth, it separates Midway Island from the other locations, emphasizing that the United States is Japan's new target.
The use of repetition in Roosevelt's Pearl Harbor speech creates a sense of urgency, appealing to the audience's emotions. In his speech, Roosevelt states, "last night, Japanese forces attacked Hong Kong. Last night, Japanese forces attacked Guam." He continues with this repetition, naming a total of four places that Japan attacked "last night." By using the same sentence structure with nearly the same words, the audience hears "last night" over and over again, followed by a different country. With this repetition, Roosevelt illustrates how many places Japan was able to attack in one night, creating a sense of urgency. Then, Roosevelt punctuates this particular instance of repetition with, "this morning, the Japanese attacked Midway Island." He continues to use the same sentence structure, but the slight change of wording is appropriate because not only does it align with the truth, it separates Midway Island from the other locations, emphasizing that the United States is Japan's new target.

Roosevelt logically constructs Japan as the enemy, justifying his proclamation of war. Illustration. Explanation. Illustration. Explanation, etc.

Not only does Roosevelt use repetition to sway his audience towards supporting him, he also uses logic.
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