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The Stolen Child

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S P

on 12 November 2012

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Transcript of The Stolen Child

Away with us he's going,
The solemn-eyed:
He'll hear no more the lowing
Of the calves on the warm hillside
Or the kettle on the hob
Sing peace into his breast,
Or see the brown mice bob
Round and round the oatmeal chest.
For he comes, the human child,
To the waters and the wild
With a faery, hand in hand,
For the world's more full of weeping than he can understand. For the world's more full of weeping than he can understand. F For the world's more full of weeping than you can understand. Statement of Intent: Yeats uses irony to illustrate mankind's failure to achieve happiness in his own home. In colloquial terms, Yeats reveals that the grass is not always greener on the other side. Away with us he's going,
Where the wave of moonlight glosses

The dim grey sands with light,

Far off by furthest Rosses

We foot it all the night,

Weaving olden dances,

Mingling hands and mingling glances

Till the moon has taken flight;

To and fro we leap

And chase the frothy bubbles,

While the world is full of troubles

And is anxious in its sleep.

Come away, O human child!

To the waters and the wild

With a faery, hand in hand,

For the world's more full of weeping than you can understand. G For the world's more full of weeping than you can understand. A

B

A

B

C

C

B

D

E

E

D

F

F

G

G F 1 2 3 4 A Where the wandering water gushes B From the hills above Glen-Car, A In pools among the rushes A That scarce could bathe a star, C We seek for slumbering trout D And whispering in their ears E Give them unquiet dreams; C Leaning softly out D From ferns that drop their tears E Over the young streams. F Come away, O human child! F To the waters and the wild G With a faery, hand in hand, Primarily iambic trimeter-quadmeter pause, expressing somewhat of a
tangent thought Exclamation, passion
helps persuade the child very rhythmic
childish rhythm Water theme, water references Relaxing diction
- soft, calming Sets a sad-sombre tone Reinforces it was said by a
non-human person (faery) Constant repetition of W sound
- consonance Away with us he's going, Refrain A reference to Yeats' holiday destination, a seaside village, shows the isolation of this place Imagery of old Irish culture A Where dips the rocky highland B Of Sleuth Wood in the lake A There lies a leafy island B Where flapping herons wake C The drowsy water-rats; C There we've hid our faery vats, D Full of berries D And of reddest stolen cherries E Come away, O human child! E To the waters and the wild F With a faery, hand in hand, Word gives feel of deep sorrow and helplessness Alliteration gives emphasis to the nature and freedom theme, escape to the wild The solemn-eyed: A B A He'll hear no more the lowing B Of the calves on the warm hillside C Or the kettle on the hob D Sing peace into his breast, C Or see the brown mice bob D Round and round the oatmeal chest. E For he comes, the human child, E To the waters and the wild F With a faery, hand in hand, Hiding berries in jam pots/bottles -> common
could possibly be a mirror to an adult activity of making Poteen (illicit brew). semi-colon -> Yeats will now answer question to "Where", will now tell what takes place on the rocky highland. Mispelt, referring to Slish wood,
slish - deriving from the Irish word "slios"
meaning sloped, or inclined as was the island Yeats is referring to. Lough Gill lake -> over 20 islands, unknown to which island yeats is referring to. Might refer to Lake Isle of Innisfree (simplicity that we all long, something that seems unattainable in this world) Italicized in poem, similar to chorus, as if the faeries are chanting this poem, further strengthened by the lines: "O human child!" Indicates faeries are chanting this Herons in Gill Lough, Swans at Coole Lough Pre-Raphaelite Verse Romantic Era like diction
of nature, animals, love and tranquility The child The child is too innocent and naive to realize the harsh nature of the world. The faeries Wandering water - alliteration sdeep ishoe sudeep ate poo poo Very romantic-era'esque with the airy, lovely tone Sudeep's Quotations: Where dips the rocky highland
Of Sleuth Wood in the lake, Where dips the rocky highland
Of Sleuth Wood in the lake
There lies a leafy island
Where flapping herons wake
The drowsy water-rats;
There we've hid our faery vats,
Full of berries
And of reddest stolen cherries.
And of reddest stolen cherries.
Come away, O human child!
The the waters, and the wild
With a faery, hand in hand,
For the world's more full of weeping than you can understand.

Where the wave of moonlight glosses
The dim grey sands with light,
Far off by furthest Rosses
We foot it all the night,
Weaving olden dances,
Mingling hands and mingling glances
Till the moon has taken flight;
To and fro we leap
And chase the frothy bubbles.
While the world is full of troubles
And is anxious in its sleep.
Come away, O human child!
To the waters and the wild
With a faery, hand in hand,
For the world's more full of weeping than you can understand.

We seek for slumbering trout
And whispering in their ears
Give them unquiet dreams;
Leaning softly out
From ferns that drop their tears
Over the young streams.
Come away, O human child!
To the waters and the wild
With a faery, hand in hand,
For the world's more full of weeping than you can understand.

Away with us he's going,
The solemn-eyed:
He'll hear no more the lowing
Of calves on the warm hillside
Or the kettle on the hob
Sing peace into his breast,
Or see the brown mice bob
Round and round the oatmeal-chest.
For he comes, the human child,
To the waters, and the wild
With a faery, hand in hand,
For the world's more full of weeping than he can understand. The author uses repetition to lull the child away to paradise. There lies a leafy island Gill Lough [Slish Wood (Sleuth Wood)] Where dips the rocky highland
Of Sleuth Wood in the lake,
There lies a leafy island
Where flapping herons wake
The drowsy water rats;
There we've hid our faery vats,
Full of berries
And of reddest stolen cherries.
And of reddest stolen cherries.
Come away, O human child!
To the waters and the wild
With a faery, hand in hand,
For the world's more full of weeping than you can understand. Far off by the furthest Rosses Where the wave of moonlight glosses
The dim gray sands with light,
Far off by furthest Rosses
We foot it all the night,
Weaving olden dances
Mingling hands and mingling glances
Till the moon has taken flight;
To and fro we leap
And chase the frothy bubbles,
While the world is full of troubles
And anxious in its sleep.
Come away, O human child!
To the waters and the wild
With a faery, hand in hand,
For the world's more full of weeping than you can understand. Rosses Point From the hills above Glencar Glencar Lough From ferns that drop their tears
over the young streams Glencar waterfall Where the wandering water gushes
From the hills above Glen-Car,
In pools among the rushes
That scarce could bathe a star,
We seek for slumbering trout
And whispering in their ears
Give them unquiet dreams;
Leaning softly out
From ferns that drop their tears
Over the young streams.
Come away, O human child!
To the waters and the wild
With a faery, hand in hand,
For the world's more full of weeping than you can understand. 1 2 Where the wandering water gushes 3 Glencar Waterfall 4 Rosses Point Beach And chase the frothy bubbles, "OH THE IRONY!" Where dips the rocky highland
Of Sleuth Wood in the lake,
There lies a leafy island
Where flapping herons wake
The drowsy water rats;
There we've hid our faery vats,
Full of berries
And of reddest stolen cherries.
And of reddest stolen cherries.
Come away, O human child!
To the waters and the wild
With a faery, hand in hand,
For the world's more full of weeping than you can understand. Away with us he's going,
The solemn-eyed:
He'll hear no more the lowing
Of the calves on the warm hillside
Or the kettle on the hob
Sing peace into his breast,
Or see the brown mice bob
Round and round the oatmeal chest.
For he comes, the human child,
To the waters and the wild
With a faery, hand in hand,
For the world's more full of weeping than he can understand. Where the wave of moonlight glosses
The dim gray sands with light,
Far off by furthest Rosses
We foot it all the night,
Weaving olden dances
Mingling hands and mingling glances
Till the moon has taken flight;
To and fro we leap
And chase the frothy bubbles,
While the world is full of troubles
And anxious in its sleep.
Come away, O human child!
To the waters and the wild
With a faery, hand in hand,
For the world's more full of weeping than you can understand. Where the wandering water gushes
From the hills above Glen-Car,
In pools among the rushes
That scarce could bathe a star,
We seek for slumbering trout
And whispering in their ears
Give them unquiet dreams;
Leaning softly out
From ferns that drop their tears
Over the young streams.
Come away, O human child!
To the waters and the wild
With a faery, hand in hand,
For the world's more full of weeping than you can understand. 1 2 3 4 Imagery, the cherries are ripe, creates a sense of energy and sanguine The faeries The stolen child The Stolen Child
By: William Butler Yeats Romanticizes the animals of the child's home, pre-Raphaelite,
Quattrocento Same romanticizing, however now Yeats is describing the child's home instead of the faeries'. Where dips the rocky highland A
B
A
B A
B
A
B A
B
A
B A
B
A
B Glencar Lough C
C
D
D C
C
D
D C
C
D
D C
C
D
D Repetition, Repetition, Repetition.......repetition (need one more)? Round and round the oatmeal chest Or see the brown mice bob Sing peace into his breast, Or the kettle on the hob Of the calves on the warm hillside He'll hear no more the lowing The solemn-eyed: The poet uses natural imagery, repetition, diction, and irony to coax the child to paradise and convey his naive nature. Sound of fire is soothing, like the waves of Innisfree, again, the simplicity we all long for Sligo County, Ireland Yeats uses nature imagery to illustrate the alluring world the faeries portray to seduce the innocent child and convey his naivety. Natural Imagery Let's all use our imaginations Contributes to carefree, fun theme of faery world. Actions are similar to child play Contrast between the previous lines, emphasizing the difference between the faery world and human world Repetition gives emphasis to the joining of hands, and the consent in the choice made by the child Sejoura, a break to answer 'where' as to what happens along this beach Repetition emphasizes the beginning of interaction between parties Through his use of repetition Yeats is able to coax the child to paradise. The author uses natural imagery, repetition, diction, and irony to draw the child to paradise and convey his naive nature. Childhood is a path that fades with age, leaving behind only memories for escape. repetition emphasizes how child is agreeing to go with the faeries alliteration gives emphasis to the old life of the child repetition gives emphasis to the old life of the child that he is giving away to go with the faeries alliteration gives emphasis to the theme of nature describes child's emotions as he's leaving with the faeries. Does not match what you would expect. faeries child describing the life the child is leaving in order to go with the faeries domesticated animals as compared to first stanza where animals chosen are free such as herons and water rats talking about childs innocence, further emphasized by alliteration Quote 1: The drowsy water-rats; Quote 2: Where the wave of moonlight glosses
the dim grey sands with light, Quote 3: We seek for slumbering trout
And whispering in their ears
Yeats uses soporific diction to induce a sense of drowsiness in the poem to symbolize the lulling of the child.
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