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Modes of Discourse Part 2

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Virginia Coleman-Prisco

on 27 June 2013

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Transcript of Modes of Discourse Part 2

Notes
Ideas
Ideas
Ideas
Modes of Discourse Module, Part 2
Introduction
What is a “mode”?
What is “discourse”?

Mode--refers to a method or form used
Discourse--the technical term for conversation


There are many different kinds of critical thinking discourses.
They are:
Statements
Arguments
Explanations
Definitions
Descriptions
Instructions

Statement
A communication or declaration in speech or writing, setting forth facts, particulars, etc.
A statement can either be true or false

Example: "Mercy College is dedicated to making a high-quality education attainable offering more than 90 undergraduate and graduate programs within its five schools: Business, Education, Health and Natural Sciences, Liberal Arts, and Social and Behavioral Sciences." (www.mercy.edu)
Argument (yes, we’ve done this before)
1. An attempt to convince or persuade a person that a claim is true by providing supportive evidence.
2. Persuasive discourse (not to be confused with fighting with someone).
Arguments can be either valid or invalid/ sound or unsound

Example: Attending College can help you have a better career and life. Mercy College is a higher educational institution that can help you achieve that. So, you should attend Mercy College.

Explanation
A meaning or interpretation
Explanations can be likely or unlikely
Opinions (personal views) can be considered interpretations but should not be assumed to be an explanation.

Example: Sara attends Mercy College because her sister went there and got a good job after graduating.

Next Steps
Now, that you are familiar with the kinds of discourse, complete the quiz that follows this video.
You will read a newspaper article and answer the questions that follow.

You will be able to refer to the excerpt throughout the quiz.

Thanks for watching!

Now, let me explain what each one is and give an example.

The formal statement of the meaning or significance of a word, phrase, idiom, etc.
Definitions can be ostensive (obvious), synonymous, analytical

Example: Success- the favorable outcome of something attempted (World English Dictionary)

Definition
A statement, picture in words, or an account representation.
Descriptions can be clear or unclear/ adequate or inadequate

Example: The Mercy College mascot is a Maverick. The Maverick is a white horse with a blue mane and grey shading.

Description
Orders or directions.
Instructions can be clear or unclear/ adequate or inadequate

Example: Write an essay about why you attend Mercy College.

(most definitions adapted from dictionary.com)
 
Instructions
Full transcript