Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

9th Grade Literary Concept Notes

No description
by

Stacy Egan

on 29 September 2015

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of 9th Grade Literary Concept Notes

GRAMMAR and Literature Concepts
Character Development:
WORD OF THE DAY!!!


Directions:

Using the story, "The Lady or the Tiger," fill in
as much as you can
about the following elements:
Setting
Characters
Conflict
Climax
Plot
Theme
Dialogue
THE MOST DANGEROUS GAME
rICHARD cONNELL
(Sept. 11)

Group Work:
One sheet per group
Write all names in top right corner
(Sept. 7)
Create a PLOT LINE

Exposition
Setting
Characters
Inciting Incident
Rising Action (4)
Climax
Falling Action (3)
Conflict
READING FOR CONNECTIONS
In the margins of your story, ask questions and make comments.
2 questions:
I wonder why...
I wonder how...
What does the author mean when by...
2 comments
This part reminds me of...
I can relate to this because...
High-light all words you can't define.
VOCABULARY:
google: "The Most Dangerous Game vocabulary"
word, definition, use in sentence
FINISH and PRINT in class-turn in to group folder
HOMEWORK: writing assignment
1. imprudent-Not showing care for the consequences of an action; rash.
a. The girl spent every dime in her wallet; she is imprudent with her money.
2. palpable-
"The Most Dangerous Game" Vocabulary
In the LAB:
1. Definitions:due today
2. Start writing assignment-due TUESDAY
Tuesday, September 18th
Journal #4
Craft #1
Quiz
Read Novel
Born: when/where
First jobs: age/what job
Served?
Places lived?
Published?
Richard Connell --pg. 12
Anticipation Guide:
Agree or Disagree with statement-2 sentences explanation
Choose
ONE
of the options and write a paragraph about it on the back of that sheet.
*One 1/2 sheet paper per group:
September 19th
*READ NOVELS WHEN FINISHED
Group Work (1/2 sheet of paper):

Setting/s:
[3]
(use descriptive words from the text)
Characters:
[4]
(use clues from text to judge characteristics)
1st Conflict: (on boat)
2nd Conflict: (in water)
3rd Conflict: (on land)
What:
We will be learning one new vocabulary word every day.
Everyday either at the beginning of class, or after the Journal.
When:
Where:
"Word of the Day" handout, stored in Group Folders.
A wider vocabulary will make reading easier and more enjoyable, and will also help you to become a better writer.
Why
Who:
Every student is responsible for their own Word of the Day, or WOD.
HOW will this be graded?
QUIZ every 2 weeks: 10 words
Check for completion EVERY Friday
IF YOU ARE ABSENT:
As with JOURNALS and CRAFTS, you are responsible for asking another student for their "WOD" notes.
WORD: figurative

Definition: not literal; using figures of speech

Usage: Nathan wrote a short story using figurative language.
September 24-28
MONDAY:
Tuesday
exemplary

Definition:
being or serving as an illustration of a type; worthy of imitation


Synonyms: model, emblematic


Usage:
Brent was an exemplary student.
Wednesday
grotesque

Definition:
distorted or unnatural in shape of size; abnormal and hideous

Synonyms: monstrous, strange, ugly

Usage: Have you read the tales of grotesque serpents eight meters long that churned the seas?
fervent (adj.)

Definition:having or showing very warm or intense spirit, feeling, enthusiasm, etc.; ardent; passionate.

Example:It was his fervent wish to see his elderly father again.

Synonyms:earnest, ardent, eager
Thursday
October 1, 2012
"Independent Reading Day"

Objective: Practice Reading/Comprehension by reading a novel of your choice (something you might enjoy).

Expectations:
Read a NOVEL (not a magazine, picture book, etc.) for the given amount of time (approx. 25 min.)
Complete the Independent Novel Assignment
Stay on task the entire hour (no sleeping, doing other homework, etc.)
Daily participation points will be given along with assignment points.
Talking, doing other homework, etc. will result in the loss of those points.
Sleeping=essay, detention, call home
October 1-5
Monday
nocturnal adjective

Definition: belonging to or active during the night

Synonyms: night-loving

Usage: Owls are nocturnal creatures.
defile

Definition: to make foul, dirty, or unclean

Example:His bad manners could only defile his already poor reputation.

Synonyms:foul, tarnish
Tuesday
Friday
flagging

Def: dwindling, weak or fatigued, or drooping

Example: His interest in piano lessons seemed to be flagging.
ornate adj.

Definition
: elaborately adorned, often excessively or showily so; decorated

Example
:The interior of the church was very ornate.

Synonyms:gilded, festooned
Wednesday
wallow

Definition: to roll about or lie in.

Example:It is not beneficial to wallow in self-pity.

Synonyms:grovel, revel
Thursday
susceptible adj

Definition: Yielding readily or capable of; Easily impressed emotionally

Synonyms: nonimmune, responsive, vulnerable

Usage: Sam was so susceptible to catching colds that he always avoided anybody who was the slightest bit sick.
Friday
*STUDY*
Word of the Day Quiz
grotesque
exemplary
figurative
defile
nocturnal
ornate
wallow
flagging
fervent
susceptible
Spirit Sign:
Create a sign to promote school spirit. The best signs will be hung up, and ex. credit will be given.
October 8-12
MONDAY
obsolete adjective

Definition: no longer used

Synonyms: outdated

Usage: Pagers and beepers are almost obsolete in our cell-phone dominated society.
chaos noun

Definition:
a state of extreme confusion and disorder

Synonyms
:
pandemonium, craziness

Usage:
Snow and ice have caused
chaos
on the roads
Tuesday
negligent adj.

Definition:1. guilty of or characterized by neglect, careless and indifferent; offhand.

Example:They were negligent in caring for their animals, so the animals were very skinny.

Synonyms:heedless, careless
Wednesday
falter
Definition:
to hesitate, waver, or fail: courage that never faltered, to move unsteadily; stumble.

Synonyms:hesitate, waver

Example:
They were never going to falter in their determination to win.
Thursday
pinnacle n

Definition:
the highest peak; the highest level or degree attainable

Synonyms: peak, summit, height

Usage:

He reached the pinnacle of his career at age 25.
Friday
facetious adj.

Definition:not meant to be taken seriously or literally.

Example:Her comments were meant to be facetious.

Synonyms:humorous, amusing.
Monday
Oct. 15-19
guise n

Definition: an artful of simulated semblance

Synonyms: pretense, pretext

Usage: Under the guise of friendship, he betrayed them.
Tuesday
CATEGORIZE
Each detail in your
VEN DIAGRAM
PLOT SETTING CHARACTERS
naive adj.

Definition:
unsophisticated; having or showing a lack of experience, judgment, or information

Example:
If you think no one cheats, you are just being naive.

Synonyms:innocent, unsophisticated
Wednesday
advocate
Definition:
a person who pleads for a cause/ to speak in favor of

Synonyms: proponent, recommend

Usage:
The environmentalist advocated for government protection of the rainforest.
scoff
Definition:
to mock; jeer, laugh at

Example:
Children often scoff at remarks made by their elders.

Synonyms: disrespect
Thursday
Friday
With your group, summarize the topic assignment for EACH Journal and CRAFT entry.
Each person hands this in.
Summarize each entry= 1 sentence.
(ex) J#1=Option to write a full page about Brainstorm list 7B, or 3 different topics from Brainstorm list.
SAME RULES apply for all CRAFT entries (C#1-Comma)
Study for WOD #3/#4==Verbal Test TODAY
Journal entry make-up==
DUE TUESDAY
Read Novel to answer IRA#4==
DUE TUESDAY
Today:
Group Work:
Obsolete
Chaos
Negligent
Falter
Pinnacle
Facetious
Guise
Naive
Advocate
Scoff
Word of the Day Quiz-Last 10 Minutes
3 OPTIONS during CLASS TIME:
Monday
loiter
Definition:
to linger aimlessly about a place; to waste time or dawdle over work.

Example:
The same group of boys were seen
loitering
near the drug store.

Synonyms:linger, dawdle
Tuesday
laggard

Definition:
a person or thing that lags; lingerer; loiterer.

Example:
He was one of the
laggards
in the group.

Synonyms: loiterer, loafer, dawdler
Lit. Concept #7:
IRONY
3 TYPES:
Verbal
Situational
Dramatic
When what someone SAYS is:
different from what they MEAN
different from what would be expected
Your little brother is sitting on the coach scowling because he doesn't want to go out to dinner.
You say, with a smirk, "I'm glad to see you're so happy about going to dinner."
Sarcastic Verbal Irony
For example, if championship swimmer drowns, or a firehouse burns down.
When the outcome of a situation is:
unexpected
not anticipated based on earlier events.
When the audience or reader knows something that the characters do not, something which adds suspense or humor.
For example: The audience knows that Juliet only drank SLEEPING POTION (and will wake up) but Romeo thinks she's dead.
Assignment:
"Irony from 'The Gift of the Magi'"
2 PARTS
Part 1
commend (verb)
Definition:
express approval of

Synonyms: recommend

Usage:
Ms. Morrow commended Annalisa’s thoroughly researched essay.
Wednesday
bask
Definition:
to lie in or be exposed to a pleasant warmth: to bask in the sun; to take great pleasure; revel.

Example:
After the long winter it felt good to bask in the sun.

Synonyms:luxuriate, revel
Thursday
weld

Definition:
to unite or fuse (pieces, as of metal or plastic) by hammering, compressing, or the like; to bring into complete union, agreement, etc.

Example:
The machinist used a torch to weld their broken chair back together.

Synonyms:attach, bold
Friday
exult v

Definition: to express great joy

Synonyms: rejoice

Usage: Cameron exulted upon hearing news of his son's scholarship.
Monday
8 Ways an Author Reveals Character
through characters' actions
through dialogue
through reactions of characters to one-another
through characters' thoughts
through character's habits
through character's possessions
through physical descriptions of characters
through background information
Vocabulary for "The Necklace"
Directions: WORD-DEFINITION, IMAGE
On a separate sheet of notebook paper, LIST each word from the box below, then the definition IN YOUR OWN TERMS, and draw a picture of something that symbolizes/helps represent the vocab word.
prospects
vexation
clerk
curios
sphinxlike

francs
pauper
adulation
aghast
ruinous

gamut
privation
askew
paste

1. Prospects- The chances or odds that you'll win or succeed.
ex:
applicable adj

Definition: capable of being applied; having relevance

Synonyms: relevant, practical

Usage: It is good to give applicable examples to support your argument.
Tuesday
garnish

Definition: to provide or supply with something ornamental; decorate; to provide (a food) with something that adds flavor, decorative color, etc.

Example:The food tray was to have some beautiful garnishes around it.

Synonyms:ornament, trim
Wednesday
residual

Definition: something left over after other parts have been taken away; relating to or indicating a remainder

Synonyms: remainder, residue

Usage: Whatever residual income I have left over at the end of the month I will put into savings.
Thursday
haughty adj.

Definition: disdainfully proud; snobbish; arrogant.

Example:He seemed haughty as he drove around in his new Jeep.

Synonyms:overbearing, arrogant
Friday
Quiz 3



2. INDIRECT CHARACTERIZATION - the writer reveals information about a character and his personality through that character's thoughts, words, and actions, along with how other characters respond to that character, including what they think and say about him.
1. DIRECT CHARACTERIZATION - the writer makes direct statements about a character's personality and tells what the character is like.
2 Types
Definition:
"The way the reader feels when reading a story."

stance the author adopts in shaping a specific emotional perspective towards the subject of the literary work.
refers to the mental and emotional disposition of the author towards the subject
lends a particular character or atmosphere to the work.
evokes specific, appropriate responses from the reader.
Mood
reiterate v

Definition: to say, state or perform again

Synonyms: repeat, restate, retell

Usage: He reiterated his request for the next available outdoor table.
Monday
Tuesday
supersede v

Definition: take the place or move into the position of

Synonyms: replace, supplant

Usage: Katy superseded Mica as team captain.
Wednesday
diffident adj

Definition: lacking self confidence

Synonyms: reserved, shy, timid

Usage: She was diffident when asked to comment on the Professor's lecture.
Thursday
1. Find a partner
2. Take assignment notes
3. Research/build Pp in lab
Civil Rights Presentation
decrepit adj

Definition: warn or broken down by hard use

Synonyms: run-down, worn

Usage: The worn and decrepit seat cushions were held together by duct tape.
Friday
kindred adj.

Definition: having the same belief, attitude, or feeling

Example:The friends sensed in each other a kindred spirit.

Synonyms:related, congenial
Monday
List 8
List 7
upbraid v.t.

Definition: to find fault with or reproach severely; censure

Example:He was upbraided by his employer for his sloppy work.

Synonyms:reprove, chide
Tuesday
artifice (noun)

Definition: a deceptive maneuver

Synonyms: ruse

Usage: The escaped convict thought of several artifices--one involving a decoy--to avoid being re-captured.
Wednesday
embargo (noun)

Definition:1. an order by a government prohibiting the movement of merchant ships into or out of its ports, 2. any restraint or prohibition.

Example:The government placed an embargo on the shipment of weapons to its enemies.

Synonyms:restriction, hindrance
Thursday
ransack (verb)

Definition: to search thoroughly or vigorously through; to search through for plunder; pillage.

Example: The burglars seemed to ransack every room of the house.

Synonyms: rummage, scour, search
Friday
St
ud
y-
Q
u
i
z
ravage
to do ruinous damage
diffident
supersede
artifice
embargo
upbraid
reiterate
kindred
decrepit
ransack
ravage
LIST #9
impending adj.

Definition:near at hand.

Example:It seemed as though a disaster was impending.

Synonyms:threatening, approaching
Monday
musty adj

Definition: stale and unclean smelling

Synonyms: stale, moldy

Usage: His clothes have a musty smell to them.
Tuesday
parsimonious adj

Definition: excessively unwilling to spend

Synonyms: stingy, ungenerous

Usage: He lived in a most parsimonious manner--denying himself every indulgence.
Wednesday
ruse n.

Definition:a trick, stratagem, or artifice.

Example:It took a ruse to lure him into that trap.

Synonyms:trick, stratagem
Thursday
Friday
qualm n.

Definition: a sudden feeling of apprehensive uneasiness; misgiving

Example: She had qualms about leaving home without telling her mom.

Synonyms: twinge, misgiving, pang
Study for MT Chpt 1&2 Quiz
uncanny adj

Definition: beyond what is natural

Synonyms: supernatural, unnatural

Usage: Clayton has an uncanny sense of direction.
Monday
List #10
tact n

Definition: a keen sense of what to say or do to avoid giving offense; skill in dealing with difficult or delicate situations.

Synonyms: sensitivity; poise.

Usage: Ramsay had a tact that would prevent her from ever being a disagreeable and unpleasant person.
Tuesday
opus n.

Definition: one of the compositions of a composer; a literary work or composition, as a book.

Example: Great composers like Beethoven, Bach, etc., have written opuses that are still very popular.

Synonyms: work, composition
Wednesday
parry v.t.

Definition: to ward off (a sword thrust, blow, weapon, etc.) to turn aside; dodge.

Example:With a flick of his wrist, Zorro was able to parry the swordsman's thrust.

Synonyms:ward off, avert, evade
Thursday
ignorant

Definition: lacking in knowledge or training; unlearned

Example: Having never listened in class, he was ignorant to the assignment.

Synonyms: uninstructed, untutored, untaught
Friday
List #11
compassion n

Definition: the humane quality of understanding the suffering of others and wanting to do something about it

Synonyms: tenderheartedness, mercifulness

Usage: The sight of hundreds of orphaned children, starved and diseased, moved Heidi to compassion.
Monday
exhilarate v

Definition: to fill with sublime emotion

Synonyms: thrill

Usage: The children were exhilarated at the prospect of going to the movies.
Tuesday
plod v

Definition: to walk heavily or firmly, as when weary or through mud

Synonyms: tramp, trudge

Usage: The horses plodded through the muddy terrain.
Wednesday
itinerary n

Definition: a proposed route of travel

Synonyms: travel plan, route

Usage: I had to make a copy of my itinerary so my dad would know when to pick me up at the airport.
Thursday
negligible adj

Definition: so small as to be meaningless; insignificant

Synonyms: trifling, meaningless

Usage: The damage to the car was negligible.
Friday
List #12
ambidextrous adj

Definition: equally skillful with each hand

Synonyms: two-handed

Usage: Kareem Abdul-Jabbar was famous for his ambidextrous hook shot.
Monday
unkempt adj

Definition: not properly maintained

Synonyms: uncombed, untidy, ungroomed

Usage: Jean's wild, unkempt hair made her look like she hadn't showered in days.
Tuesday
ferocious adj.

Definition: savagely fierce or cruel; violently harsh; brutal

Example:The ferocious lion lunged at his prey.

Synonyms:fierce, severe
Wednesday
coherent adj

Definition: Marked by an orderly, logical, and aesthetically consistent relation of parts

Synonyms: understandable, clear, logical

Usage: The toddler spoke In a coherent and eloquent manner that seemed far beyond her years.
Thursday
List #13
copious adj

Definition: large in number or quantity

Synonyms: abundant, extensive, ample

Usage: Students were instructed to take copious, concise notes.
Monday
Tuesday
exuberant adj

Definition: joyously unrestrained

Synonyms: abundant, extravagant, spirited

Usage: The exuberant crowd cheered on the graduate class of 2007.
Due in Folders:
Concept of the Day
Grammar Lesson of the Day
Monday
SIMILE
vs.
METAPHOR
Simile-
Compare 2 unlike things
"like" or "as"
(ex.) Her eyes were bright like stars.
Metaphor-
Compare 2 unlike things
Declaration
(ex.) Her eyes were stars.
Monday
Commas
The room smelled of gym socks, Doritos, and exhaustion.
What do you notice about this sentence?
Using your own words, create a sentence with the same format.
Tuesday
1. During breakfast, at the town diner, Mildred noticed the clean tables, the paintings on the wall, and the happy customers.
2. The muddy smelly brown dog tracked dirt onto the floor.

3. Relaxing on the beach, George watched the seagulls flying, but then he had to leave suddenly, because he noticed he was late for work.
SPOTTING COMMA ERRORS
Describe the error in each sentence: (comma splice or missing comma)
Tuesday
Is it a SIMILE or a METAPHOR?
He was as strong as an ox.
The ocean roared like a lion.
Her eyes were stars.
The dog's drool was a waterfall.
*Write the following sentences, followed by (S) or (M)
Wednesday
"Static" and "Dynamic" Characters
static
= Lacking in movement, action, or change
static character
=someone who
doesn't change
at all throughout the novel.
dynamic
=Characterized by constant
change
, activity, or progress.
dynamic character
= someone
who changes
during the novel. (Point of view, outlook on issues, etc.)
Wednesday
Quotations and Commas
"I want to go to the mall!" she shouted.
"I said," her mother replied, "that we would go tomorrow."
The girl looked defeated, then asked, "You really won't go today?"
"I'm too tired," stated her mother.
*What do you notice about the placement of the punctuation and the quotations?
*Copy the following sentence, then explain why it's wrong and how to correct it.
"Don't eat that apple," warned Sherry. "I saw a worm in it", she then explained.
POV
Point of view is the way the author allows you to "see" and "hear" what's going on.
1st Person:
3rd Person Limited:
3rd Person Omniscient:
Narrator tells the story from his/her perspective.
"I" "we" "us" "me"
Outside source tells story
Can only see main characters thoughts/feelings
You are "Limited" to hearing about 1 character.
Outside source tells story
Can see 2 or more characters thoughts/feelings
Thursday
Thursday
Commas and Quotes cont...
1. "I'm moving away," said George "I need to get away from here."
2. "Hey Paul," said George. "the book you gave me is really good."
3. "Mighty fine day isn't it," asked George.
4. "Hey" said George. "How was your day?"
Briefly describe the change that must be made in order for this sentence to be correct.
Friday
3 Types of IRONY
verbal irony
-
when what is said is different from what is meant.

situational irony
-
what actually occurs is the opposite of what is expected.

dramatic irony
-
reader knows something that the characters do not
Friday
Quotations and Punctuation
1. Find dialogue from Hiram, and directly copy the quote from the novel, including 'tags'.

2. Find dialogue from Grandpa Hillburn, and directly copy the quote from the novel, including 'tags'.

3. Find dialogue from Naomi, and directly copy the quote from the novel, including 'tags'.
"CONCEPT"
"GRAMMAR"
#1:
Characteristics of Non-fiction Literature
biography
food writing
literary journalism
memoirs
personal essays
travel writing
Many Forms:
"Real people, real places and real emotions."
Documentable subject matter
Thorough Research: Facts/Stats
Exploration of Human Emotions
"Theme"
#1:
Writing Dialogue
Re-write the example below, adding quotations and punctuation were necessary.
"I'm tired, Sally said "Let's go home."

"You're always tired" Fred exclaimed.
#2
Summarizing

pull out main ideas
focus on key details
use key words and phrases
break down the larger ideas
write only enough to convey the gist
take succinct but complete notes
5W, H:
#2
Dialogue
Using your own words, imitate the dialogue below.
"The power went out," Jordan went on, "at the game last night."
Cindy screamed, "What happened to the lights?"
In your groups:
Bullet Point the MAIN IDEAS of the article you just read.
WHO all was involved (include bio)
WHAT happened?
WHEN did it happen?
WHERE did it happen?
WHY did it happen?
HOW was it resolved?
Separate Sheet of Paper
*
Highlight the text where 5W, H is found.
#3
Characteristics of a HERO
Bravery:
"You can't be brave if you've had only wonderful things happen to you." ~ Mary Tyler More:
This is the most important characteristic of a hero. You have to be brave to stand up and fight.

Courage:
"Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts" ~ Winston Churchill:
You need the courage to fight a situation no matter how bad it is. Heroes have the fear of losing but they also have the courage to drive away that fear.

Determination:
"The difference between the impossible and possible lies in a man's determination." ~ Tommy Lasorda:
When you have the determination to fight something, no matter how weak you are, you will win.
#3
Dialogue
*
Re-write each sentence, adding capital letters, quotations, and punctuation when necessary.
1. george answered matter is anything that takes up space and has mass

2. When she saw his new Mercedes, she exclaimed What a beautiful car
EACH student
should arrange their work IN THIS ORDER, 1=1st Page.
OUT OF ORDER=POINT DEDUCTION.

1. "TTTC" notebook paper questions
2. "TTTC" Questions worksheet
3. "TTTC" Structured Essay
4. "TTTC" 7 Connections
5. "Only Daughter" Wksht
6. "Quotation Mark Practice"
7. "Hero" full page article: from Wed.

#4
Dialogue Terms:
Dialogue
: words spoken OUT LOUD, surrounded by quotes. (" ")

Dialogue Tag
: words written to establish the speaker of the dialogue.

"Imitate"
-create a similar sentence using the format of the example sentence.
#4
JOURNY OF AN EPIC HERO
CALL
-Invites hero into adventure/quest
THRESHOLD
-Jumping off point
TESTS
-Series of challenges/temptations
ABYSS + REVELATION
- Must face greatest fear alone.
ATONEMENT
-Incorporate changes caused by journey.
RETURN
-return to everyday life, somewhat improved by journey.
#5
Recognizing Dialogue Format
We've established that there are
4
dialogue formats:
#1:

"Complete sentence," tag.
#2:
Tag, "Complete sentence."
#3:
"Complete," tag, "sentence."
#4:
"Complete sentence," tag. "Complete sentence."
*
Directions: Create 1 sentence for each type of format.
#5 Examples of Heroes:
G
roup Folders
raded
=
Concept/Grammar of Day
Summarizing Test Practice Ex.
"Girl Catches Fire" article
"Writing Dialogue?!?!"
"Recognizing Dialogue Format"
Today is the Deadline-
Progress Reports
Up to Feb 25
Grammar
Literary Concept
#1C:
Structure of Newspaper Article
IN THIS ORDER:
1. Scavenger Questions: Trojan War
2. Summarizing Text Practice
3. Recognizing Dialogue Formats
4. Writing Dialogue?!?!
5. Girl Catches Fire at Oregon Hospital
6. Concept of the Day

*We will check "Hero Chart," "Odysseus Vocab,"
and "Introduction to Odysseus" on MONDAY.

#2C
*List 2 sensory words for each of the 5 senses.
Sensory Details
G#1 Colons vs. Semi-Colons
Colon--use before a list
(ex) I will do three things this summer: swim, bike, and camp.
Semi-colon-- used to seperate 2 complete sentences that deal with the same subject matter.
:
;
(ex) I will do many things this summer; warm weather allows me to be active.
G#2 Colons
2. To introduce the effect, or logical consequence of an action. (Ex. ) There was only one way he could win: he had to cheat.

Imitate:
G#3 Semi-Colons
Semi-Colons are used to join 2 COMPLETE SENTENCES without adding a conjuction (for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so)

How could you combine the following sentences?

The snow has melted. It's finally spring!
Answers: The snow has melted and it's finally spring!

The snow has melted; it's finally spring!
G#4 Conjunctions
Conjunction: the act or an instance of conjoining : the state of being conjoined : combination

Examples: (Choose and write 8 in notes)
for, or, yet, so, even though, if, after, wherever, until, when, while, although, as, provided that, as if, that, as much as, as though, because, though, as long as, before, in order that, in case, lest, once, by the time, even if, as soon as, only if, since, and, so that, nor, but, than, till, unless, whenever, where
C#3 Tragedy
Tragedy:
literary work of serious actions in which the main character has a disastrous fate.
includes incidents arousing pity and fear
depicted (showed) a decline from happiness to misery because of some flaw or error of judgment
EXAMPLE: Romeo and Juliet
*Correctly use the conjunction: "unless" in a sentence.
Group Folder:
1.“Perfect Paragraph” Packet:
+Staple 1/2 sheet to WKSHT #11
2.Grammar Quiz (Both)
3.Society for Neuroscience Chart Worksheet
4.The Colon Packet
5.FANBOYS cartoon picture w/ 4 sentences
6. 1/2 sheet OUTLINE QUIZ
G#5 Commas and Phrases
1. Use a comma to set off
introductory elements
, as in "
Running toward third base
, he suddenly realized how stupid he looked.

2. Use a comma to set off
parenthetical elements
, By "parenthetical element," we mean a part of a sentence that can be removed without changing the essential meaning of that sentence.
"The Founders Bridge,
which spans the Connecticut River
, is falling down."
Ex.
C #4
Rhyme Scheme
When a poem has rhyming words at the ends of its lines, these are called “end rhymes.” Here is an example of end rhyme:

My cat is nice.
My cat likes mice.
Rhyming words are words that sound the same at the ends, such as
cat / hat
, or
jumping / thumping
.
A “
rhyme scheme
” is a way of describing the pattern of
end rhymes
in a poem.
Each new sound at the end of a line is given a letter, starting with “A,” then “B,” and so on.
If an end sound repeats the end sound of an earlier line, it gets the same letter as the earlier line.
My cat is
nice
.
A
My cat likes
mice
.
A
My cat is
fat
.
B
I like my
cat
.
B
Your Turn!!!
My cat is nice. ___
My cat is fat. ___
My cat likes mice. ___
I like my cat. ___
Daily Dilemma
Can YOU solve the
?
1.
He says, he can't imagine needing any more carrots or onions.
a.) NO CHANGE
b.)says
c.) says, that
d.) says, that,
2.
So, when she has went to buy a new car, she brought her dad to help her.
a.) NO CHANGE
b.) had went
c.) went
d.) goes
C#5 Alliteration
a-"LL"-iteration:
Little Ligers Live Long
CREATE YOUR OWN a "LL"iteration:
__________________________________________
3. When he went to buy new shoes-owing to the fact that his old ones had holes-the salesperson tried to talk him into buying leather boots.

a. NO CHANGE
b. due to the understandable fact
c. because
d. so
4. Which sentence is correct?
a) I took Barb, the one with the glasses to the mall last night.
b) I took Barb, the one with the glasses, to the mall last night.
c) I took Barb the one with the glasses to the mall last night.
d) I took Barb, the one with the glasses, to the mall, last night.
5. I need watermelon oranges and grapes from the store.
a.) NO CHANGE
b.) I need: watermelon, oranges, and grapes from the store.
c.) I need watermelon, oranges, and grapes from the store.
d.) I need watermelon, oranges, and grapes, from the store.
6. Which of the following sentences is correct?
a.) Although, you may be wrong, I will take your word for it.
b.) Although, you may be wrong I will take your word for it.
c.) Although you may be wrong, I will take your word for it.
d.) Although you may be wrong I will take your word for it.
7. Which is the best description for the term IMAGERY?
a.) using images instead of words in a written story
b.) waying or writing something other than what is meant
c.) making word pictures appealing to the five senses
d.) describing images in a descriptive essay
8. What function does the introduction perform in a writing piece?
a.) explains the title
b.) offers background information on the topic
c.) supports the thesis
d.) provides closure to the paper
9. How do you develope the body paragraphs in a writing sample?
a.) with supporting evidence from sources
b.) very carefully
c.) with your own observations
d.) with opinions
10. In general, what does the conclusion do in a piece of writing?
a.) brings closure to the paper and restates the thesis
b.) directly supports the thesis
c.) prompts the reader to take some sort of action
d.) narrows down the topic
11. Which of the following is an effective way to engage your reader's attention in an introduction?
a.) give a comparison or ask a thought-provoking question
b.) tell a story
c.) give a quotation, fact, statistic, or definition
d.) all of the above
12. Quotation marks must be placed around:
a.) paraphrases
b.) summaries
c.) direct quotes
d.) author's last name
13. Each of your body paragraphs should discuss an idea that:
a.) is related to but not relevant to your thesis statement
b.) is directly related to and supportive of your thesis
c.) will be interesting
d.) you feel strongley about
14. The salesperson tried to talk my grandma into buying a cell phone, telling her that she would no longer have to get out of her chair to answer the phone. My grandma said that she was perfectly capable of getting out of her chair.
Given that all are true, which of the following additions to the preceding sentence (replacing "chair") would be most relevent?
a.) chair that was made out of wicker.
b.) chair when someone was calling.
c.) chair by the north side of the house.
d.) chair where she liked to sit
15. The Smith family made their living working alternately as share-croppers and butchers.

Which of the following would NOT be an acceptable replacement for the underlined portion?
a.) earned their living by
b.) made their living by
c.) made their living from
d.) earned their living
16. Find the correct sentence.
a. It was raining, however, she still went running.
b. It was raining; however, she still went running.
c. It was raining: however, she still went running.
d. It was raining, however; she still went running.
17.
a. Please Bill, take the job as manager.
b. Please, Bill take the job as manager.
c. Please Bill, take the job, as manager.
d. Please, Bill, take the job as manager.
18.
a. The river which is black as night runs next to the border.
b. The river, which is black as night runs, next to the border.
c. The river, which is black as night, runs next to the border.
d. The river, which is black, as night runs next to the border.
a. Odysseus
b. Circe
c. Polyphemus
d. Poseidon
Match:
19. Cyclops blinded by Odysseus
20. Witch; turned men into pigs
21. Smart, courageous Greek hero
22. God against Odysseus
1. Who is Calypso
2. Who is Circe
3. Odysseus's homeland
4. Greeks found this offensive
5. Which of the following is NOT a theme in the Odyssey?
-loyalty to family and friends
-importance of truth
-overcoming obstacles
-the relationship between gods and humans
6. Cyclopes name
7. God most against Oysseus
8. War that started Odysseus's journey
9. At the beginning of the story, we learn that ________ are overcoming Odysseus's house
10. Odysseus's son
11. Odysseus's helper
12. Odysseus is known for his strength and also this...
13. How does Odysseus win the battle with the Cyclopes?
14. What is Odysseus disguised as when he returns to Ithica?
15. Calypso held Odysseus prisoner for how many years?
16. Which weapon is used in the challenge that Penelope presents to the suitors?
17. Who treasures the cattle that Odysseus's men eat?
18. How does Odysseus get his men past the Sirens?
19. Why does Odysseus go to the Land of the Dead?
20. The turning point of a story:
21. Who are the Lotus Eaters?
22. Why doesn't Odysseus just kill the Cyclopes?
23. What is an epic?
24. To gather, summon
25. Abundance; a great quantity or amount
26. Causing fear, apprehension, or dread
27. secret, sneaky
28. seemingly harmless but actually with grave effect
29. Who are Juliet's parents?
30. Where did Romeo and Juliet meet?
31. T or F: Juliet knew who Romeo was when they first kissed
32. T or F: Romeo agrees to go to the Capulet party in order to see if Juliet is more beautiful than Rosaline.
33. Why doesn't Lord Capulet kick Romeo out of his party?
34. What does Juliet mean when she says, "Deny your father and refuse your name" ?
35. Who is Juliet's cousin?
36. Why does Juliet tell Romeo not to swear by the moon?
37. Why does Friar Laurence first question Romeo's love for Juliet?
38. Why does the Friar agree to marry Romeo to Juliet?
39. How does Juliet get out of the house to meet Romeo?
40. repugnantly hateful; detestable; loathsome
41. Why didn't the Friar's plan for Juliet's sleeping potion work?
42. What does Juliet send to Romeo as a symbol of her love?
43. What is Juliet's reaction when her mother first asks her about marrying Paris?
44. How does Paris die?
45. What does Capulet threaten when Juliet says she won't marry Paris?
46. Who tells Romeo that Juliet is dead?
47. How does Romeo react to the news of Juliet's death?
48. to work havoc upon; damage
49. opponent, enemy, foe
50. Which is correct?
a. She needed: eggs, cake mix, and frosting.
b. She needed three things: eggs, cake mix, and frosting.
51. Which is correct:
a. The river, which runs at a quick pace, is a dark color.
b. The river which runs, at a quick pace, is a dark color.
52. "Heavy lightness" ...example of which literary term?
53. "The grey-eyed morning smiles at the night"...example of which literary term?
Short Story Plot Structure
Exposition=
setting
characters
Inciting Incident=
Incident that sets the plot in motion
Ties in with the conflict (main problem)
Rising Action=
Exciting events that lead up to the Climax
Create suspense and intrest
Climax=
Turning Point of the story (everything is different after this)
Answers the "Big Question"
Falling Action=
Ties up loose ends in the plot
Resolution=
The story comes to a reasonable ending
Literary Notes #1 & #2
Literary Concept #3
Suspense:
Creates tension and uncertainty
Makes the reader ask "What will happen next?"
(ex) a character stuck on the edge of a tall building, or tied to a railroad tracks as a train approaches.
Which parts of TMDG create suspense?
Make your LIFE EASIER!!!!

http://www.sparknotes.com/short-stories/the-most-dangerous-game/themes.html

PERSONAL NARRATIVE:
http://teachers.sduhsd.k12.ca.us/kburke/tips_for_writing_a_personal_narr.htm
Literary Concept #5:
SUMMARIZING
http://unitproj.library.ucla.edu/col/bruinsuccess/03/10.cfm
A summary
restates the author's main points
: purpose, intent and supporting details
in your own words
.
offer an accurate sense of the
full original
, but in a more
condensed form

enables you to
grasp the original text better
makes it possible for you to
analyze and critique the original text.

spot the
main ideas
Do not add your own ideas
, opinions or judgment of the arguments
Should be
shorter than the source
WHAT???
WHY???
HOW???
5W,
H
: WHO, WHAT, WHEN, WHERE, WHY,
HOW
Literary Concept #4:
Characteristics of a Short Story
Focus on a single plot, setting, limited characters, covers a short period of time
exposition, inciting incident, rising action, climax, falling action, resolution
Usually start in the middle of a story, usually ends abruptley
Usually has a lesson: THEME
Literary Concept #6
Allusion

a
reference
in a literary work to
a person, place, or thing
in history or another work of literature.
references to
well-known characters or events
CAPITAL LETTERS
Write down 1 example
“I was surprised his nose was not growing like
Pinocchio
’s.” This refers to the story of Pinocchio, where his nose grew whenever he told a lie.
“When she lost her job, she acted like a
Scrooge
, and refused to buy anything that wasn’t necessary.” Scrooge was an extremely stingy character from Charles Dickens’, A Christmas Carol.
Michael Phelps
, this for you, baby!
I'm goin for the gold,
my heart is in control
My mind is on succeed
and I am in the lead
NOT this
Allusion, NOT ILLusion
LIBRARY ASSIGNMENT:
"Everybody likes SOMETHING, and there are books about EVERYTHING."
Find 3 books that you might be interested in reading in the future.
SUMMARIZE each book:
5W,H (read the back of the book, answer as many as you can)
Conclude with one sentence explaining WHY you would be interested in that book.
• Those that read have higher GPA’s, higher intelligence, and more general knowledge than those that don’t.
• Cunningham’s studies have found that analytical thinking is boosted by reading. Readers improve their general knowledge, and more importantly are able to spot patterns quicker. If you can spot patterns quicker, your analytical skills receive a boost--> BETTER AT TAKING TESTS.
• Reading increases your vocabulary and improves your spelling more than talking or direct teaching; knowing what other people are saying and using the perfect words to convey your feelings is a critical part of being a better human. Better listeners are more successful in life.
• The more you read, the better of a writer you’ll become.

Literary Concept #7
3 Types of Irony
Situational

Verbal

Dramatic
When the opposite of what is expected happens.
When someone means the opposite of what they
say.
When the reader/viewer knows something that the character in the story doesn't know.
"I can see you're happy about going into time-out!"
This is VERBAL IRONY because this boy is clearly NOT happy about going into time-out; the speaker
SAID
something but
MEANT
the opposite.
The VIEWER can see that the character is about to be eatten by a shark. The CHARACTER has NO CLUE that they are in danger.
The place that USUALLY FIGHTS FIRES is ON FIRE. This is an IRONIC SITUATION, because it's something that we would NOT EXPECT.
1st:
2nd
3rd
Literary Concept #8:
3 Types: Point of View (POV)
Point of view is the way the author allows you to "see" and "hear" what's going on.
1st Person:
3rd Person Limited:
3rd Person Omniscient:
Narrator tells the story from his/her perspective.
"I" "we" "us" "me"
Outside source tells story
Can only see main characters thoughts/feelings
You are "Limited" to hearing about 1 character.
Outside source tells story
Can see 2 or more characters thoughts/feelings
Literary Concept #9
Indirect Characterization: S.T.E.A.L.
Characterization is the process by which the writer reveals the personality of a character.
Direct:
tells
the audience what the personality of the character is.
Indirect:
shows
things that reveal the personality of a character.
"George was easy-going; he didn't like to discuss problems if he could avoid it."
"Dell," said he, "let's put our Christmas gifts away and keep 'em for awhile."
S.
T.
E.
A.
L.
Speech:
What does the character say?
How does the character say it?
"Give the invitation to someone whose wife can afford to dress better than I can..."
Thoughts:
What kinds of things does your character think about?
What do the characters feelings say about who they are?
"She grieved incessantly, feeling that she had been born for all of the little niceties and luxuries of living."
Effect on others:
How does the character make other people feel?
How do other characters behave or react to the character?
"The other, not recognizing her, showed astonishment at being spoken to so familiarly by this common person."
Actions:
What does the character do?
How does the character behave?
"She had a well-to-do friend ...whom she would no longer see, simply because she would feel so distressed on returning home. And she would weep for days on end from vexation, regret, despair, and anguish."
Looks:
What does the character look like?
How does the character dress?
"He turned a bit pale, for he had set aside just that amount to buy a rifle..."
Parts of Speech
Literary Concept #10:

Nouns:
Verbs:
Adverbs:
Adjectives:
Conjunctions:
definition
3 examples
Literary Concept #11:

Static Characters vs. Dynamic Characters
CHARACTERS: Static, Dynamic, Flat, Round
Flat Characters vs. Round Characters
Literary Concept #12:
Epic Poems
An
epic poem
is:
A
long narrative
poem
On a
serious
subject
Written in a
grand
or elevated style
Centered on a larger-than-life
hero


Epics also tend to have the following characteristics:
An opening in
medias res
An invocation to the
Muse
A concern with the fate of a nation or people
A correspondingly large scale, often ranging around the world (and in Milton's case, beyond the earth and into heaven)
The intervention of supernatural figures, who are interested in the outcome of the action (the system of gods, demons, angels, and such is often called machinery)
Extended similes, generally called
epic similes
Extensive battle scenes;
A few stock episodes, including a visit to the
underworld
.
Literary Concept #13:
Epic Hero Cycle
1. Call
2. Threshold
3. Tests
4. Abyss
5. Atonement
6. Return
GRAMMAR GIFT!!!
Grammar Gift #1:
Commas and Conjuctions
Do you remember what a conjuction is?

Which part of the word describes its meaning???
Conjunction
Con
JOIN
1
+
1
=
2
The dalmation's coat was black
and
white.
Neither the teachers
nor
the students wanted another snowday.

F. f
or
A. a
nd
N. n
or
B. b
ut
O. o
r
Y. y
et
S. s
o
Memory hint: FANBOYS
(and, but, for, nor, yet, or, so)
Use a
comma
+ a little
conjunction
to connect two independent clauses

(ex) He hit the ball well
,

but
he ran toward third base.

(ex) Harry Potter went to 3 years of magic school
,

and
today he is a professional magician.

(ex) The rain, wind, and low temperatures were unbearable
,

so
my parents left the track meet.

(ex) The rain, wind, and low temperatures were unbearable
,

yet

my parents stayed for the whole track meet.


*Practice*
Create sentences for 3 of the conjunctions from FANBOYS.
(
3
seperate sentences, each using
1 comma
and
1 conjunction
.)
Literary Concept #14:
Tone verses Mood
Tone may be playful, formal, angry, serious, ironic, outraged, baffled, tender, serene, depressed, etc.
Tone: the writer's attitude toward the material and/or readers.
Relate it to YOUR LIFE:

My mom said "we'll see," but I could tell from her tone at the answer would be no.

Tone is the WAY people say things!
I can see you're happy about going to lunch!
I can see
you're
happy about going to lunch...
“And the trees all died. They were orange trees. I don’t know why they died, they just died. Something wrong with the soil possibly or maybe the stuff we got from the nursery wasn’t the best. We complained about it. So we’ve got thirty kids there, each kid had his or her own little tree to plant and we’ve got these thirty dead trees. All these kids looking at these little brown sticks, it was depressing.”
What is the tone here?
Which
words
brought you to your choice?
Grammar Gift #2
Introductory Elements & Commas
Introductory elements consist of:
clauses, phrases and words that appear before the main clause of the sentence.

Introductory Elements usually answer questions "where?" or "when?"
At the park, the children played for hours.
Before testing all day, Roger ate a healthy breakfast.
Where?
When?
Practice:
As she was walking home Kelly stubbed her toe.
During the storm my flowers were destroyed.
At the reunion I saw people I haven't seen in ten years!
Identify each introductory element
How the reader FEELS while they're reading the text.
“The river, reflecting the clear blue of the sky, glistened and sparkled as it flowed noiselessly on.”
What kind of
MOOD
does this put you in?
“There was no moon, and everything beneath lay in misty darkness: not a light gleamed from any house, far or near all had been extinguished long ago: and those at Wuthering Heights were never visible…”
-Wurthering Heights
-Charles Dickens
What kind of
MOOD
does this put you in?
How does this piece of writing make me
FEEL
?
What is the
ATMOSPHERE
of this text?
The
TONE
of the
WRITER
influences the
MOOD
of the
READER!
Literary Concept #15:
Non-fiction Literature: Memoirs
Story of a
mem
ory
Focuses on a certain event from the writer's past
1st Person POV
Gives many details
Ends with a reflection of what the author learned from that experience
"The Relatives Came" by Cynthia Rylant
Grammar Gift #3:

Combining Complete Sentences
Those were long days. My mother was working in the underground
;
my father was in jail.
Those were long days. My mother was working in the underground
.
My father was in jail.
Those were long days. My mother was working in the underground
, and
my father was in jail.
#1
#2
#3
There are 2 ways to combine complete sentences:
1.
2.
Comma Conjunction
Semi-Colon
It was snowing
, so

I gassed up my snowmobile.

It was snowing
;

I gassed up my snowmobile
.
PRACTICE!
1.) The elephant stomped hello to its friends.
2.) The stomp could be heard for miles and miles.
;
Combine the sentences using
BOTH
methods:
-
Comma, conjunction
-
Semi-colon
1. The elephant stomped hello to its friends, and the stomp could be heard for miles and miles.

2. The elephant stomped hello to its friends; the stomp could be heard for miles and miles.
Answer:
SEMI-COLON
http://theoatmeal.com/comics/semicolon
LITERARY CONCEPTS
#L.C.1: Short Stories
Can usually be read in one sitting
Focuses on just 1 incident
Single plot, single setting, limited characters, limited time span
Short Stories....
Think about a Roller Coaster...
How does it start?
How does it end?
What is the best part?
What is the most boring part?
Short stories are like roller coasters: the beginning is the most boring part, there are small excitments on the way to the top, and after the big drop everything calms back down.
L.C. #2: Exposition
The EXPOSITION is the Set Up

...we meet the characters and find out where & when the story takes place

Setting + Characters
Why is it called 'exposition'???
exposition:
a large public exhibition of art or trade goods.
Where
INFORMATION
is
PRESENTED
.
Where people go to
GATHER INFORMATION
.
Exposition is where we gather information about the
That's the
PLOT!
Literary Concept #3
CONFLICT
:the problem or issue to be resolved in a story
1.External: Man vs. Nature
L.C. #4
Inciting Incident:





FIRST sign that something is
wrong
or
out of the ordinary
Events
after the inciting incident that continue to build
SUSPENSE
; the action leading up to climax
Rising Action:
Inciting Incident & Rising Action
L.C. #8: SUMMARIZING FICTION
LC #5: Simile & Metaphor
BOTH compare two unlike things.
Simi-LIKE or AS
Simile:
"eyes
like
stars"
Metaphor:
"eyes
are
stars"
"man was like a beast"
"beast of a man"
Practice:
LC #6: Figurative Language
personification
: giving human, or
person
, qualities to something that is not a human.

allusion:
referring to a famous person, book, play, historical event, etc that is OUTSIDE of the text.

irony
: when the opposit of what you expect happens.

foreshadowing:
when the author hints to something that will happen later in the story.

imagery
: words that paint a mental image
ex. The tree branches whipped angrily in the wind.
ex. He lied more than Pinocchio.
ex. We try to stay civilized here.
ex. They call it "Ship-Trap" islad.
ex. The fine, white sand pebbles sqeaked under my bare feet as I strolled down the sun-lit shore.
Verbal: (Sarcasm)
"I can see that
you're
happy about going to school today!" his sister said.
Situational:
A firehouse on fire is an ironic SITUATION because we WOULD NOT EXPECT IT.
Dramatic:
We can see that the character is in danger, yet the character has NO CLUE.
This creates
DRAMA
.
Summarize
"The Most Dangerous Game"
OR
"The Necklace"
using the answer plan below...
SOMEONE...

WANTED...

BUT...

SO...

THEN...
Practice #1:
Who were the Main Characters; give BRIEF explanation about who they are...
What was the conflict or problem?
What did the character want or hope would happen?
How did the character solve the problem?
How did the story resolve, or end?
Mathilde Loisel was very beautiful, and she believed that she was cut out for the lifestylfe of the upperclass. She wanted to appear to be rich at the ball she and her husband had been invited to, but her husband is only a civil servant and can't afford any jewels for her. So, she borrows a diamond necklace from her friend. Mathilde lost the necklace after the dance, and she and M. Loisel spend the next 10 years paying off the debt of the replacement. Then one day, Mathilde tells her friend the truth about the necklace, only to find out that the necklace she had borrowed wasn't made of real diamonds and cost much less than the one they had replaced it with.
Example:
Mathilde Loisel
was very
beautiful
, and she
believed that she was cut out for the lifestylfe of the upperclass
.
She wanted to appear to be rich at the ball
she and her husband had been invited to,
but her husband is only a civil servant and can't afford any jewels for her
.
So, she borrows a diamond necklace from her friend
.
Mathilde lost the necklace
after the dance, and she and M. Loisel
spend the next 10 years
paying off the debt of the replacement. Then one day, Mathilde tells her friend the truth about the necklace, only to
find out that the necklace she had borrowed wasn't made of real diamonds and cost much less
than the one they had replaced it with.
Literary Concept #9:
Making READER'S CONNECTIONS

Our Text:
The Best School Year Ever
by: Barbara Robinson

~ Let’s Practice ~

Verbal Reponses – The reader would discuss the connections they made with a text aloud with others in a group.
Written Responses – The reader would write the connections they could make with a text down on a sheet of paper or in a response journal.

Response Options for Sharing Connections …


These are connections that readers make between the text they are reading and other texts the reader has read before.

Other kinds of texts might include books, poems, scripts, songs, or anything written.

You could even include movies or television shows that you have seen before.

Connection:
Text – to - Text

Text – to – Self

Text – to - Text

Text – to - World

~ Types of Connections ~


Good readers make connections to better understand what they are reading.

Why should we make connections?

“That reminds me of … “
“Remember when … “
“This is like … “
“This character makes me think of …”
“This setting reminds me of … “

Ways to Start your Connections …


These are connections that readers make between the text and the bigger issues, events, or concerns of society.

To make these types of connections the reader must think about what is going on in the world around them.

Connection:
Text – to - World


These are connections that readers make between the text (what you are reading) and their own past experiences and/or background knowledge.

Connection:
Text – to - Self

Good readers use their own background knowledge and prior experiences to make connections.

There are 3 different ways that a reader can make connections …

How do readers make connections?


Connections are links that readers can make between what they are reading and things they already know about.

What are Connections?

Ashley Brown Westwood Elementary, 2005

Making Connections

Our previous
experiences
,
knowledge
,
emotions
, and
understandings
affect
what
and
how
we learn.
It helps readers understand how characters feel and the motivation behind their actions.
It helps readers have a clearer picture in their head as they read thus making the reader more engaged.
It keeps the reader from becoming bored while reading.
It sets a purpose for reading and keeps the reader focused.
Readers can see how other readers connected to the reading.
It forces readers to become actively involved.
It helps readers remember what they have read and ask questions about the text.
Write @ least 2 REASONS
HOW DO THEY HELP?!?!
Make Connections!
3 Ways:
Text to Self
Text to Text
Text to World
Literary Concept #10:
Iambic Pentameter
Foot: the unstressed syllable followed by a stressed one
Shakespeare's sonnets are written predominantly in a meter called
iambic pentameter:
a rhyme scheme in which
each sonnet line consists of ten syllables
.

The syllables are divided into
five pairs called iambs
or iambic feet: one unstressed syllable followed by one stressed syllable.
Example: good BYE.
A line of iambic pentameter flows like this:
baBOOM / baBOOM / baBOOM / baBOOM / baBOOM.
1
2
3
4
5
Full transcript