Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Positive effects of inclusive practice

No description
by

helena reeve

on 22 September 2015

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Positive effects of inclusive practice

Positive effects of inclusive practice
self image (self esteem)
Developmental benefits
opportunities to play and socialise
development of self-efficacy
Emotional well-being
Health outcomes
positive attitudes towards others
'Do it now'
Task
Refresh your memory!
What do the P.I.E.S stand for?
How will the P.I.E.S be used in an inclusive environment?
be ready to discuss
Task
Thinking about the P.I.E.S, give examples of how an inclusive setting can help with children's individual needs?
Set it out with each P.I.E.S as a title and think of examples for each one
Present your findings as a poster with keep points identified.
Task
in pairs research the term
self-efficacy.
How can working in an inclusive setting promote 'self-efficacy within children?
be ready to discuss
How can an inclusive practice support a child's emotional well-being?, and also support how they have positive attitudes towards others?
Discuss on your tables and mind-map ideas
Learning Aim
Success Criteria
To know a range of different 'positive' ways which in which inclusion benefits children's development
be able to describe giving examples of positive effects of 'inclusive practice' on a child's well-being
How might non inclusive practice affect children’s self image
What is meant by the term learned helplessness
Can you think of an example of how development might be delayed in non inclusive settings
Can you think of an example of how a child’s health might be affected in a non inclusive setting
Why might educational outcomes be lowered if there is non inclusive practice.

Assessment point

Learning Aim A: Understand the importance of inclusive practice in early years

Read the following activities then answer the questions

Camping overnight in February in freezing temperatures.
Restricted diet due to religious beliefs.
Going to the theatre/opera.

Do you do any of these activities?
Have you any friends/relatives who do any of these activities?
Why might these activities be seen as normal for some but odd to others?

Activity

Learning Aim B: Explore ways in which early years settings implement inclusive practice

Glossary

Educational outcomes lower as a result of not being given the same opportunities to develop skills and knowledge as these have not been met.
Lack of provision for children who need additional support.
A dyslexic child not being given an audio tape of the lesson/ coloured paper/ print out of the power point. All of these can disadvantage a child with educational needs, limiting their ability to learn and develop.

How non inclusive practice may affect children's outcomes

Delayed development as a result of late identification of needs or needs not being met.
The later an identification of developmental delay the harder to make progress in both speech and language. If adults do not talk and communicate with children and take time to listen children will stop trying to communicate.
Poor health outcomes lower as a result of not having the same opportunities to develop skills and knowledge not being met. Basic needs such as food, balanced diet if these are not met then the child will have a poor health outcome. Example a baby with sensitive skin/eczema if not changed regularly will develop nappy rash, if not treated this can become infected.

How non inclusive practice may affect children's outcomes

Learning Aim A: Understand the importance of inclusive practice in early years
Learning Aim B: Explore ways in which early years settings implement inclusive practice
Learning Aim C: Understand how children are empowered in early years settings
Learning Aim D: Understand the importance of the key person approach in supporting children’s development 

Unit 3 The Principles of Early Years Practice

Outcomes for children affected by non inclusive practice
Over dependence on adults or a feeling that other children are preferred (liked more) than they are with key adults. Belief they are not a good as other children. Leads to a lack of confidence.
Poor self image as a result of feeling unwanted, helpless or inferior.

Low self efficacy as children may have learnt helplessness (or see themselves as a victim) the child learns to he helpless and passive to any situation. This causes the child to give up quickly on things and believe there is no point in carrying on trying to help themselves.

How non inclusive practice may affect children's outcomes

What is meant by the term inclusive practice
How might children’s emotional well being be supported by inclusive practice
Can you think of an example of how inclusive practice can support social development
How can inclusive settings improve health outcomes for children with health needs
How might adults in inclusive settings teach children to value others regardless of their background

Assessment point

All will be able to understand the importance of inclusive practice in early years.
Most will be able to apply the importance of inclusive practice in early years.
Some will be able to analyse the importance of inclusive practice in early years.

Opportunities to play and socialise with children (gaining social skills and learn to express feelings and emotions)
In an inclusive setting adults will adapt and engage/help the child to play both with others or adapt games so that the child can access the game. Where settings show this type of inclusive practice, children will not only gain social skills through play, also learn to express feelings and emotions.


Develop self efficacy (can do) attitude children have confidence to try new activities, cope in unfamiliar situations.
Inclusive settings allow children to feel they are capable of undertaking any activity given them in the setting with the support of Adults.

Positive effects of inclusive practice

All will be able to understand the importance of inclusive practice in early years.
Most will be able to apply the importance of inclusive practice in early years.
Some will be able to analyse the importance of inclusive practice in early years.

Self image , confidence, motivation and positive attitudes to others.
During the first years of life children are learning about themselves. Their self image is evolving and developing. The things that children learn are dependant on their personal experiences as well as how they are treated.
Children who feel that significant adults believe in them are more likely to try out new things and be motivated to develop, learn and explore. It also helps children to be positive about others.

Developmental benefits, opportunities and adapted to individual needs.
Children who are in inclusive settings are likely to make good progress. This is because a wide range of opportunities, equipment and activities will be available. Adults involved in this inclusive practice will try to work out what play, equipment and materials the child needs. By thinking about the child’s individual needs, adults are often in the best position to realise when additional help is needed or required.
The inclusive setting works with other professionals, such as speech and language therapists to make sure that the child has the best support. An inclusive setting will also adapt to meet the needs of the child as they alter.
An example of this a table may be covered with a white cloth to help a child with poor vision see the jigsaw more easily. For a child with mobility issues a ramp may be added to allow them to go from one level to the other with ease.

Positive effects of inclusive practice

Internally assessed

Unit 3 The Principles of Early Years Practice

Emotional well being (due to being accepted and cared by others)

Positive benefits to health outcomes as physical needs are met from inclusive practice. Life threatening illnesses such as diabetes are treated in an inclusive setting with both the parents/carers of the child, other professionals and the adults in the care setting to support the child and ensure that they have all of their specific needs met. This can ensure a healthy outcome for the child.
Development of positive attitudes to others due to knowing how to value and support others regardless of the age, disability, race, background, gender or lifestyle.

Positive effects of inclusive practice

In pairs discuss the following :
Have you ever been somewhere and felt you were not wanted? How did this make you feel?
Did this affect how interested or confident you felt?

Inclusive practice is identified as the way in which children and their families are valued and supported regardless of :
Age
Race
Background
Gender
Lifestyle
This then ensures that children and families can benefit from the services and opportunities available. The positive way that inclusive practice can help children.

All will be able to understand the importance of inclusive practice in early years.
Most will be able to apply the importance of inclusive practice in early years.
Some will be able to analyse the importance of inclusive practice in early years.

Activity
In pairs write down two characteristics of an inclusive environment.

Learning Aim A: Understand the importance of inclusive practice in early years

All will be able to understand the ways in which early years settings implement inclusive practice.
Most will be able to apply the ways in which early years settings implement inclusive practice.
Some will be able to analyse the ways in which early years settings implement inclusive practice.

Inclusive practice in early years settings

Activity in groups
Think of different ways a setting show a non judgmental attitude to a child and their family/carers.

Activity: In pairs
Discuss ways in which settings can make children and their families feel welcomed.

All will be able to understand the ways in which early years settings implement inclusive practice.
Most will be able to apply the ways in which early years settings implement inclusive practice.
Some will be able to analyse the ways in which early years settings implement inclusive practice.

How early years settings ensure that children and their families are respected and valued and how children’s unique needs can be met, allowing all children to be supported and included.

Inclusive practice in early years settings, including:
Adopting a non judgmental attitude, such as respecting individual differences, cultures and beliefs, uniqueness of each child.

Learning Aim B: Explore ways in which early years settings implement inclusive practice

Homework
Design a room in a children's nursery showing the different resources and activities in the nursery which can promote diversity

Activity
In groups create a poster for an open day using different languages
Then plan an activity for an open day which shows inclusive practice with diversity as the key theme.

Your text here

All will be able to understand the ways in which early years settings implement inclusive practice.
Most will be able to apply the ways in which early years settings implement inclusive practice.
Some will be able to analyse the ways in which early years settings implement inclusive practice.

Implementing a welcoming environment, posters in different languages, greeting parents
Using or displaying resources that reflect children’s lives and celebrate diversity, home corner, dressing up clothes

Inclusive practice in early years settings

Children who are in inclusive
settings are likely to make
good progress.



This is because a wide range of opportunities, equipment and activities will be available. Adults involved in this inclusive practice will try to work out what play, equipment and materials the child needs. By thinking about the child’s individual needs, adults are often in the best position to realise when additional help is needed or required.
The inclusive setting works with other professionals, such as speech and language therapists to make sure that the child has the best support. An inclusive setting will also adapt to meet the needs of the child as they alter.
An example of this a table may be covered with a white cloth to help a child with poor vision see the jigsaw more easily. For a child with mobility issues a ramp may be added to allow them to go from one level to the other with ease.

Developmental Benefits
Do it now
Full transcript