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Emily's 7th Grade Class: Persuasive Writing

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Emily Peterson

on 23 July 2013

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Transcript of Emily's 7th Grade Class: Persuasive Writing

Persuasive
Writing

Xin cháo!
Because some of you seemed tired last week, you will no longer be given chairs in writing class. Instead you will stand all period. You may not sit on the floor or on the desks. You may not lean on anything or move around at all.
Please write a paragraph in your notebook about your reaction to this new policy.
Objective:
Proving Behavior:
Purpose:
Today you will be able to organize your ideas for a persuasive expository paragraph.
Make an informal outline from a prompt.
Organization is one of the most important traits of good writing, and in order to make sure our writing stays organized, we need to learn to use outlines.
Step 1: Read Your Prompt
and Write Your Position
"Your school has recently adopted a new policy that all students must wear a dress code consisting of jeans or black bottoms with black or white shirts. Supporters hope this new policy will cut down on gang activity and will allow students to focus more on learning. Opponents claim that students have a right to express themselves as individuals through their choice in clothes. What do you think?
Step 2: Generate Reasons
* I wouldn't say:
"I don't look good in black, therefore the school shouldn't have a dress code."
Step 2: Generate Reasons
* I would say:
"Black and white aren't even our school colors."
"Kids have the right to express themselves with their clothing."
"It won't help with gangs because they'd just figure out another way to show membership."
Step 2: Generate Reasons
* Important notes:
Usually a good idea to have 2-4 reasons
Reasons are star ideas, so each one is written with a star.
Your reasons have to make sense to your reader and be convincing to everyone who reads them.
Step 2: Generate Reasons
* Thumbs up if it's a good reason,
thumbs down if it's bad:
Dress codes are lame.
A potential intruder could easily figure out the dress code, so it wouldn't keep kids safer.
Kids from schools with dress codes do not test any better than kids from schools without them.
Middle school kids hate uniforms.
Step 2: Generate Reasons
* Now:
Work with a partner to come up with at least 2 reasons to support your position on the no chairs rule. When you're finished, write your position and reasons on your informal outline. Be ready to share with the class!
Step 3: Expand
The hardest part of persuasive writing: expanding and explaining each of your reasons using examples and evidence. (The E's)
Step 3: Expand
Back to the dress code example:
"School spirit will go down if we can't wear school colors!"
"How do you express yourself?"
Step 3: Expand
* This is the important part *
You have to convince me that you should get your chairs back. All you have to do is come up with some really good E's. Write them each on a strip of paper and come tape them to the board next to the reasons we wrote down earlier.
Step 4: COLORS
When you write your position, you color it
GREEN
because it gets you going.
Your reasons are
YELLOW
because yellow reminds you to slow down and think "Why?"
Your E's should be
RED
because you have to stop and explain each reason with an example or evidence.
Use this prompt to make an informal outline:
Many people believe that violence in video games has a negative effect on American kids because it promotes violence. What do you think?
Important parts:
Position written in 3rd person
At least 2 reasons
Each reason has an explanation (that is not a restatement)
Closure:
Whipshare: One thing you learned about persuasive writing today.
Aloha!
Take your seat and silently get started on your Do Now:
Read the paragraph on class sizes in school and answer the following questions on the lines below:
What is the author's position?
What led the author to write this text?
Objective:
Proving Behavior:
Purpose:
Today you will be able to write a thesis statement for a persuasive paragraph or essay.
Write at least 3 occasion/position statements given a prompt or informal outline.
Thesis statements are an important starting point for persuasive writing. They focus your argument and get you set up to persuade your audience in the rest of your paragraph/essay.
Step 1: 2 Parts
"If our country is serious about saving gas, we must explore the concept of electric cars."
Step 1: 2 Parts
Step 1: 2 Parts
Occasion: Tells the reader your reason for writing
Position: Shows what you plan to prove
*Do*
Pull out your guided notes. Explain in your own words what the occasion and position do. Work in pairs to circle the occasions and underling the positions in the IDing section
Step 2: Writing a Position
Thesis statements are always in the same order: first occasion, then position.
We practiced writing positions yesterday as part of our Informal Outlines.
A good position clearly states what you will prove in your essay or paragraph, and doesn't use the words I, me, or my.
Step 2: Writing a Position
"If we value the quality of our public schools, we should work to eliminate large class sizes."
This position is clear (and notice I didn't use I, me, or my, but I did use we).
Step 2: Writing a Position
*Do*
Turn to a neighbor and explain what makes a good position.
Step 3: Writing an Occasion
Reread your position and think about the reasons you are writing.
Look at the list of words that can start your occasion and choose one to begin.
There is always a comma between your position and occasion!
Step 3: Writing an Occasion
Pick a prompt from the HW last night for so we can try out our new Occasion Position sentence!
Step 3: Writing an Occasion
Choose one of your positions from last night's HW and write an occasion for a thesis statement based on it in your guided notes.
In Practice Section of Guided Notes:
Write an Occasion Position statement for the two prompts and outline in your notes.
Occasions start with a key word are are separated from positions by a comma. Positions are clear and not in the 1st person. They clearly answer the prompt.
HOMEWORK:
Read "Adopting a Pet from the Pound" and write an occasion position statement containing your opinion on the matter.
CLOSURE:
What makes a good position? A good occasion?
Shalom!
Think back to our first week at Breakthrough, when we were working on Informal Outlines. What 3 parts made up an Informal Outline?
* Silently start your Do Now *
Objective:
Proving Behavior:
Purpose:
Today you will be able to write an outline and effective persuasive paragraph from prompt.
Write an outline and paragraph from a persuasive prompt of your choice and revising it using organization guidelines.
An organized paragraph is the most persuasive paragraph!
Step 1: Review Outlining
Who remembers the chant? The motions that go along with it?
Step 1: Review Outlining
Turn to a partner and share the process of making an outline.
Step 2: Adding Transitions and a Conclusion Sentence
Before we can turn our outlines into persuasive paragraphs, there are two things we need to do:
Add transitions
Add conclusion sentence
Step 2: Adding Transitions and a Conclusion Sentence
Next: Add a conclusion sentence to our paragraph
We are going to learn the easiest way today: take the position from your thesis statement without the occasion, and use synonyms to say it in other words.
Step 2: Adding Transitions and a Conclusion Sentence
"If we value the quality of our public schools, we should work to eliminate large class sizes."
"We should challenge our school leaders to put an end to large class sizes."
Step 2: Adding Transitions and a Conclusion Sentence
Now look at the outline we made together as a class for getting back our chairs. Work with a partner to add transitions and a conclusion sentence.
Step 3: Putting It All Together
We can now use our IO's to write our final paragraphs. We start with the thesis, then go through the yellows and reds in a zigzag.
Remember: each star idea gets its own sentence, and shouldn't blend in with the examples or explanations that are next to it.
Step 3: Putting It All Together
If we value the quality of our public schools, we should work to eliminate large class sizes. First of all, large class sizes diminish teachers' ability to work one-on-one with their students. This can lead to students getting lost in material they do not understand. Second...
Step 3: Putting It All Together
Write your own persuasive paragraph about the no chairs example!
Step 4: Revise
Last thing: check to make sure paragraph is well balanced.
Highlight finished paragraph to make sure there is enough of each color.
Good paragraphs: lots of red, less yellow and green. They also have transitions!
Not balanced? Revise it!
Step 4: Revise
Turn to your partner and explain what a good paragraph looks like when it is highlighted.
Try your hand at teaching!
Look over the student's outline and paragraph, and find 2 things to praise and 2 things to correct. Present it to the class like a teacher!
Read the prompt and the outline that has been written to answer it. Fill in the blanks in the outline and write a persuasive paragraph based on it.
On the back of your note card: write one thing that squared with your beliefs, one thing still circling in your head, and three important things to remember (triangle).
Quiz your essay writing skills:
We will learn the correct answers to these questions later in class.
T/F When writing an essay, you should make an outline for each paragraph before you start your rough draft.
T/F The main difference between an essay and a paragraph is that in an essay, you have more star ideas to explain.
T/F In an essay, you should have a topic sentence to begin each new paragraph, but only one thesis statement for the entire essay.
Objective:
Proving Behavior:
Purpose:
Today you will be able to plan a persuasive essay.
Choosing a prompt and writing an informal outline from it.
We plan essays so they are interesting and to the point!
Step 1: Big Picture: Stretch, Don't Stack
Today we will start work on our persuasive essay project for the summer!
When writing an essay: don't stack separate paragraphs on top of each other. Instead, stretch out one outline and take all your paragraphs from it.
Stretch, not stack!
Step 1: Big Picture: Stretch, Don't Stack
Let's label our informal outlines! We need
one
paragraph for
EACH star idea
, plus
one
for the
thesis statement
and
one
for the
conclusion
.
What motions will help us remember to stretch, not stack?
Turn to a partner and discuss "How many paragraphs would an essay with
3 star ideas
have?
Step 3: Outline From a Prompt
Almost always begin writing persuasive essays from prompts
Now we'll practice the whole process: from prompt outline. Get out your VIP!
Step 3: Outline From a Prompt
Redo the Do Now quiz, then we'll check answers!
Step 2: Adding Detail to the E's
Now you know: One IO can be used for the whole essay
The difference between a persuasive paragraph and a persuasive essay is all in the E's
In paragraphs, each star idea has one or two E's supporting it.
In essays, each star idea will have its own paragraph.
How do we do that? By adding to each of our E's
Step 2: Adding Detail to the E's
Turn to a partner and discuss: "What is the difference between writing a persuasive paragraph and a persuasive essay?"
Here we go!
#1
Choose 3 prompts from a list of 6 you would be interested in writing about.
#2
Write an occasion/position statement for each one, and list the reasons you would use to support your thesis.
#3
Then pair up and swap papers. Each student reads his/her partner's ideas and ranks them from 1-3 based on both how interesting and how provable they are.
#4
Swap back and each student picks the occasion/position and reasons they will use to write their essay.
Now:
Make an informal outline from the prompt you chose above.
(The more work you do now, the less you have to do when you write your essay.)
Occasion/Position statement
2 - 4 Reasons
E's - some with extra bulleted elaboration
Conclusion sentence
Transition words
It MUST have:
Whipshare:
It is important to stretch, not stack. What does that mean?
Guten Tag!
Take your seat and silently get started on your Do Now!
Take out the outline you made for your homework and label each part green, yellow, or red.
Then, finish these sentences explaining what each section does at the top of your essay template:
The green section
The yellow section and always uses a word (like first, second, last).
The red section and in an essay I can make this section longer by .
Step 1: Big Picture, How to turn outlines into paragraphs
Before you can start writing an essay: you have to understand what each part of our IO translates to.
Note: every essay won't necessarily have the same # of paragraphs
The top of the outline and thesis statement will become the first paragraph
The first reason and all the E's that correspond to it will become the second paragraph
The second reason and all its E's will become the third paragraph
The third reason (If there is one) and all its E's will make the fourth paragraph.
Finally. the conclusion sentence will become the last paragraph.
Step 3: Writing body paragraphs
The rest of the process of writing body paragraphs is a review of what we did last week. Now that you have used your star idea to make a transition topic sentence, all you need to do is write your E's.
You should have at least 4 sentences after your TS, but you could have more depending on how detailed you E's are.
Body paragraphs do not need to have conclusion sentences because we are stretching, not stacking, and our conclusion will come at the end of our essay.
Step 3: Writing body paragraphs
Now do the same with your first body paragraph. When you finish, raise your hand and I'll come take a look!
Step 2: Transition Topic Sentences
Today we will focus on paragraphs 2 and 3 (and 4 if you have one), the body paragraphs. So for right now I will just use my thesis statement as my first paragraph and my conclusion sentence as my last paragraph without changing them at all.
Each body paragraph will begin with a "transition topic sentence" which is a topic sentence that we make by combining our star idea and a transition.
Step 2: Transition Topic Sentences
Transition:
Reason:
Transition Topic Sentence:
* Celebrities are role models for children and
teens. *
The first reason
* The first reason celebrities should face
greater consequences for breaking the law is
that they are role models for children and
teens. *
Now:
Finish your other paragraph(s) the same way! Use the VIP from yesterday, and ask me for help!
Whipshare:
One thing you learned about writing a persuasive essay today or yesterday.
Gude! Find a seat and silently get started on your Do Now.
In your guided notes, answer: What do you think is the importance of having a good introduction and conclusion in your essay?
Objective:
Proving behavior:
Purpose:
Today you will be able to write an introduction and conclusion paragraph for a persuasive essay.
Writing an introduction and conclusion for the essay you have been working on.
The introduction to an essay is where you hook your reader, and interest him/her in what you have to say. The conclusion is your last chance to make an impression and convince the reader of your position.
Step 1: Adding
The Blues
So far we have learned about green, yellow and red sentences.
Green sentences:
introduce our topic and tell the reader what we will be proving
Yellow sentences:
use transitions to tell the reader our reasons for holding the position we have chosen
Red sentences:
explain our reasons and give real life examples to back them up
Blue sentences:
hook the reader and get him or her to keep reading
We color this sentence
blue
because it's kind of like the music that's called the blues: it jazzes things up, and makes them more relatable and exciting
Step 1: Adding
The Blues
Look over each type of blue on your Leads handout
Then: choose the example you like best from the handout and explain to a partner why you like it and how it grabbed your attention.
Step 2: Transitioning into the thesis statement
Now that we know what the
blues
look like, we are going to add them to our introductory paragraphs.
There are 2 steps to using
blues
in your intro:
Write 2-5 sentences of
blues
that have to do with your topic
Then write a bridge sentence to connect your
blues
to your thesis statement
Step 2: Transitioning into the thesis statement
Step 2: Transitioning into the thesis statement
Step 3: Purpose of the
conclusion and practice writing the conclusion
Now that we know how to write a strong introduction by adding blues to jazz things up, we can learn how to write a conclusion.
Conclusions have two purposes:
Summarizing or restating your position
Adding a twist
The twist can take many forms, but today we will learn two:
acknowledging an opposing argument
examining a broader implication/connection to the real world
Step 3: Purpose of the
conclusion and practice writing the conclusion
Example:
Step 3: Purpose of the
conclusion and practice writing the conclusion
Work with the same thesis and a partner to write a conclusion to go with your introduction.
Now:
Write an intro and conclusion paragraph for your essay.
As humanity continues on its path of indifference to our environmental impact, species around the world are going extinct, glaciers are melting, and temperatures climb across the globe
.
The United States needs to lead the charge to a greener future
. To combat these environmental issues, at least 10 percent of the federal budget should be spent on limiting pollution.
Step 2: Transitioning into the thesis statement
Step 2: Transitioning into the thesis statement
Consider the following thesis statement:
Even though smoking is still socially acceptable to many people in the United States, there should be an absolute ban on smoking in public because second-hand smoke endangers the health of non-smokers.
Turn it into a paragraph by writing some
blues
and a bridge sentence with a partner.
The Baiji dolphin, also known as the "goddess of the Yangtse" was a freshwater dolphin found only in the Yangste river in China. After China's industrial revolution, the species quickly diminished in numbers due to commercial fishing of the river and the vast amount of pollution being disposed in their only home. In 2007, the species was pronounced functionally extinct.
The Baiji is one of many animals around the world becoming extinct due to human influence
.
If the United States wants to limit damage to our environment and the other animals with whom we share it, at least 10 percent of the federal budget should be spent on limiting pollution.
Konnichiwa! Take a seat and silently get started on your Do Now:
Objective:
Proving behavior:
Purpose:
Today you will be able to write a final draft.
Proofreading your persuasive essay for common errors, correcting them, and writing a final draft in "published" form.
In order for readers to focus on ideas and opinions, it is important to present final drafts without distractions from poor grammar, spelling, or presentation.
Step 1: Cups method overview and C...Capitalization
Before we can write our final drafts, we need to proofread our essays one last time.
We will use a system called "CUPS" to proofread.
First we'll look at Capitalization
Step 1: Cups method overview and C...Capitalization
First: read the reminders under the C on the handout so you know what to look for when reading the essay
Next: Read essay and look for mistakes in capitalization
When you find one: underline the letter that needs to be capitalized 3 times
When you find one that is but shouldn't be: put a slash through the capitalized letter
Step 1: Cups method overview and C...Capitalization
Now: Go through the first paragraph of your friend's essay and look for errors in capitalization. Make sure to use the symbols I did to make corrections.
Step 2: U...Usage
After capitalization we move on to U for usage
Usage is a combination of grammar and word choice. When an essay has good usage, the reader understands it the first time they read it.
You should always read the essay again when moving onto the next step in CUPS because it is easier to focus on one thing at a time.
Step 2: U...Usage
First: read the reminders under the U on the handout so you know what you're looking for when you read the essay.
Next: read essay and look for mistakes in usage.
When you find one:
Circle not indented paragraphs and areas that don't make sense
Draw a line through words in different tenses, vague words, and extra words, and write a suggestion for a different word.
Step 3: P...Punctuation
First: read the reminders under the P on the handout so that you know what you're looking for when you read the essay
Next: read essay and look for mistakes in punctuation
When you find one:
Add proper punctuation with a different colored pencil/pen and circle it.
Put an X over punctuation that shouldn't be there at all.
Step 4: S...Spelling
First: read the reminders under the S on the handout so that you know what you're looking for when you read the essay
Next: read essay and look for mistakes in spelling
When you find one:
Put a line through misspelled words
Spell the word correctly next to it or in the margin
Now:
Finish proofreading your partner's essay
Closure:
What do the 5 letters in CUPS stand for?
Pull out your rough draft of your essay. You have 5 minutes to make any last minute additions/changes before we peer edit! When the 5 minutes are up, trade papers with a partner.
Full transcript