Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

The Wedge Co-op & the Cooperative Movement

No description
by

Matthew Carlson

on 7 May 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of The Wedge Co-op & the Cooperative Movement

The Wedge Co-op and
the Cooperative Movement A business owned by its customers
Member/owners work together for a common goal, that of good product and service
Profit makes further service possible The Rochdale Society of
Equitable Pioneers Only open a few nights a week, they used the store as a classroom on Sundays The Cooperative Principles Based on the Original Rochdale Principals 3: Member Economic Participation 5: Three Special Practices:
Education, Training and Information 6: Cooperation Among Cooperatives 7: Concern For Community In Britain in 1844 only 1 in 7 men in the UK had the right to vote. Women did not get to vote for another 74 years, but thanks in part to the co-ops, the Married Women's Property Act was passed in 1870. Ownership Finances and Decision making 1: Voluntary and Open Membership Only profit that is not needed for the business is returned as cash to the members proportionally, based on their purchases. Rochdale promoted education via classes and books.
We teach members about the foods we carry and food-related health topics. We work with a national co-op community to spread the world about cooperation as a way of organizing to meet human needs in a sustainable way. We try to educate lawmakers and policy-makers in particular. New in 1995, this was a response to expressed values of cooperators in the developing world. WedgeShare was developed as one expression of the new principle. What Is a Co-op? Main Types of Co-ops Consumer Co-ops Worker Co-ops Producer Co-ops Most commonly found in agriculture Generally created to get better prices for product, supplies and equipment, cut down on processing costs and to market their goods Examples Owned and democratically controlled by the employees Worker co-ops are found in many different kinds of industries Examples Purchasing/Retailors' Co-ops Made up of businesses that join together for increased influence, competitiveness, distribution and buying power In many cases, allow small businesses to compete with their much larger competitors Examples Most common type of co-op Created by individual consumers to receive specific goods and/or services Financial Co-ops Health Care & Insurance Co-ops Housing Co-ops Credit Unions that provide financial (banking) services to its members Examples Provide healthcare and insurance against fire, flood, etc. Examples Member based housing where each member is granted a housing unit Examples Everything from student housing to Manhattan highrises Food Co-ops Utility Co-ops Provide a public utility like electricity, water and phone service Mostly located in rural areas that investor-owned utilities would not service Examples Food co-ops are found in communities all over the country They have been the pioneers in the organic & natural foods movement Examples Consumer Co-ops How They Work Members Board Of Directors CEO Employees Owners & users of the Co-op who elect fellow members to serve on the Board of Directors Own Direct Manage Serve 2: Democratic Control 4: Autonomy & Independence Open to everyone No social barriers to membership like religion, race, gender & politics Every Member has one vote Historical Context No member has a larger say than another member Outreach New in 1995, requires that agreements co-ops make with other entities, including governments, ensure democratic control by the members. Co-ops don't exist to enrich individual investors. Co-op shares exist to benefit the co-op as a whole and may not be traded. Ensures development of the co-op and financial stability Surpluses are allocated back into the co-op in the members name Historical Context Elected members who set policy and direction of the Co-op and hire the CEO Oversees day to day operations of the entire co-op and it's employees Run the day to day operations of the co-op and provide service to the members 1970s Natural Food Co-op Movement Product of Multiple Influences Culturally Active Era Populism & Progressivism Traditional Thriftiness Valued Conservation Movement 19th Century Natural Foods Teachers: Kellogg, Post and Graham Native American Concepts of Breadth of Diet Civil Rights The Vietnam War Women's Liberation Corporate Power Environmental Movement Excess Packaging, Single-Use Items & Planned Obsolescence Food Movements Whole & Natural Foods vs. Artificial Additives & Refining Spiritual Movements Often Had a Dietary Component to Them Brought In New Foods & Traditions Vegetarianism & Macrobiotics Board Of Directors Seven Board Members To ensure sound management of the co-op Areas of Focus Hiring and evaluating the CEO Long-range strategic planning Financial oversight Recruiting new directors Primary Duties To set long-range goals and plan for the future To act as trustees on behalf of the membership First successful modern consumer co-op
Opened in 1844
Took 2 years to organize & plan
Rooted in the upheaval caused by the Industrial Revolution After half a year they were able to rent the upper room and fill it with books and periodicals for members Education was part of the plan from the beginning The Cooperative Principles Based on the Original Rochdale Principals 3: Member Economic Participation Finances & Decision making Only profit that is not needed for the business is returned as cash to the members proportionally, based on their purchases. 4: Autonomy & Independence New in 1995, requires that agreements co-ops make with other entities, including governments, ensure democratic control by the members. Co-ops don't exist to enrich individual investors. Co-op shares exist to benefit the co-op as a whole and may not be traded. Ensures development of the co-op and financial stability Surpluses are allocated back into the co-op in the members name 5: Education, Training and Information 6: Cooperation Among Cooperatives 7: Concern For Community Ownership 1: Voluntary and Open Membership Rochdale promoted education via classes and books
We offer classes & teach members about our products and food-related issues We work with a national co-op community to spread the world about cooperation as a way of organizing to meet human needs in a sustainable way. New in 1995, this was a response to expressed values of cooperators in the developing world
WedgeShare was developed as one expression of the new principle. 2: Democratic Control Open to everyone No social barriers to membership like religion, race, gender & politics Every Member has one vote No member has a larger say than another member Outreach Board Of Directors Seven Board Members To ensure sound management of the co-op Areas of Focus Hiring and evaluating the CEO Long-range strategic planning Financial oversight Recruiting new directors Primary Duties To set long-range goals and plan for the future To act as trustees on behalf of the membership Wedge History Located on Franklin Ave in the garden level of an apartment building
Mostly bulk bins and a register
Sales rapidly outgrew capacity
Organics? First Location Second Location 1974 1979 Located in a former convenience store, where our parking lot is now
1,200 square feet of retail space
Management and membership restructured
In 1988, sales topped $1.6 million
Again, sales rapidly outgrew capacity Current Location Expansions Co-op Partners Warehouse Gardens Of Eagan 1992 1999 2007 Distributes organic produce and other perishables throughout the upper Midwest
In 2006, tripled in size from 15,000 to 45,000 square feet
Fastest growing arm of the Co-op 4,800 square feet of sales floor
After 1 year, sales were nearly $5 million & membership was 1,300
Growth was relentless
Almost instantly realized the need to expand again 1997 10,800 square feet of retail space
After 1 year, sales were nearly $15 million and membership over 5,300
In 2000, added a Bakehouse & a walk-in storage freezer One of the oldest organic produce farms in the Twin Cities area (1973)
Purchased by the Wedge to keep it in production
Established Organic Field School Wedge Co-op Membership Employees can have $10 deducted from their paycheck! Elect directors
Vote in membership referenda
Adopt or change bylaws
Require that the co-op follows its bylaws
Require accurate, timely reports on the co-op’s operations and financial performance
Review general financial records for information on the co-op’s financial status
Hold the co-op accountable for legal and fiscal actions Member Rights Member Responsibilities Patronize the business—use the co-op’s services
Provide capital by investing in the co-op
Promote the co-op to others
Understand the needs of businesses and those of their co-op
Keep informed; know what is going on at the co-op
Participate in co-op activities
Understand co-op principles and objectives
Attend co-op meetings; raise concerns
Vote and participate in decision-making processes Patronage Refunds Excess profits distributed back to member/owners
Based on member purchases
About 75% of sales are to members
Non-member profits are heavily taxed (47%) Take Away The Co-op is a value based, not profit driven business
The purpose of the co-op is to provide goods and services to it's members
The Wedge was created by its members to provide natural, organic and locally produced food for the community
Co-ops thrive when conventional business markets aren't meeting a need
Full transcript