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Arts in the curriculum

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Sam Cairns

on 7 July 2014

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Transcript of Arts in the curriculum

Arts in the curriculum
English Baccalaureate
Schools are required to publish the number of students that get A-C grades across 5 subject areas at GCSE level. These are: English, Maths, Science, Modern Foreign Languages and Humanities (History and Geography).
Attainment 8
From 2016 schools will be asked to publish league tables of children’s attainment in their 8 Best GCSE subjects. These 8 GCSEs will need to include English, Maths and at least three other English Baccalaureate subjects
Progress 8
Schools will be judged on the progress that young people make in these 8 Best GCSE subjects
Discount Codes
Discount codes mean that several arts subjects at Key Stage 4 are now considered so similar that only one should count towards a schools league table. These include disciplines such as Graphic Design and Ceramics.
National Curriculum
Art & Design and Music are subjects in the National Curriculum and have to be studied to age 14. The requirements have been reduced from September 2014.

Dance is included in the PE curriculum.

Drama is included in English Literature.

The National Curriculum in England applies to all maintained schools, but not academy and free schools.

At secondary level over half of schools are academies and exempt from following the National Curriculum. These schools instead are judged on their pupils results at age 16.

Provision of arts subjects in curriculum time
Availability of arts teachers
Arts Teacher training places down by 42% since 2010
In 2012 15% of schools surveyed by Ipsos Mori for the Department for Education reported they had withdrawn an arts subject because of the EBacc. 21% of schools with a high proportion of free school meals (FSM) reported withdrawing arts subjects.
Why is this important?
The Cultural Learning Alliance (CLA) is a collective voice working to ensure that all children and young people have meaningful access to culture
Schools White Paper The Importance of Teaching, published by the Department for Education, stated that "Children should expect to be given a rich menu of cultural experiences."

Schools remain the single most important place where children learn about Cultural Education.
The CASE review:
taking part in structured arts activities could increase children’s cognitive abilities test scores by 16% and 19% on average

British Cohort Study
1 standard deviation increase in cognitive ability age 11:
20.2% rise in the likelihood of staying on at school post-16
10% increase in hourly wages at the age of 42.

Students from low income families who take part in arts activities at school are three times more likely to get a degree

participating in structured arts activities led to increases in transferrable skills of between 10-17% .

“When employability is controlled for the number of years spent in school, young people that studied arts subjects tend to have higher employability and are more likely to maintain employment than those that did not study arts subjects.

In addition, young people who took 2 or more arts subjects at standard grade tend to have a higher rate of employment than those who took only 1 arts subject ” DTZ, Arts and Employability, 2006


NELS:88 survey - 12,000 participants through to age 26

Low SES at age of 26
High-arts 24.3% volunteering
Low-arts 10.8% voluneering

High-arts students were:
15% more likely to vote
30% more likely to have voted in the most recent presidential election
20 percent more likely to have voted in any election in the 24 months

• Sutton Trust research: 68% of professional parents versus 31% of lowest income parents pay for music, drama or sport lessons.

• DCMS Taking Part data: 33% of 11-15 year old boys and 20% of girls do not access arts outside of schools and children from lower socio-economic backgrounds have less access to arts than children from wealthier families.

• In 2009 Ipsos MORI found 77% of parents with A Levels or a degree reported their child as having participated in cultural activities with the family in the past year compared to 60% of parents with no qualifications. The same study also found that there are ‘no statistically significant differences in terms of children’s participation with their school by parental qualification level’.

What next?
Curriculum development
STEAM
Questions for school leaders and governors:

1. Why is art, craft and design important in your school?
2. Where does or can art provision:
a. contribute to the ethos and cultural offer of the school?
b. contribute to children’s social, moral, spiritual and cultural development?
c. involve and motivate children so that they develop as expressive, creative and confident artists?
d. involve children in active learning, with opportunities for independent learning, problem solving and decision making?
3. How do you assess the quality and the impact of the art, craft and design offer on children’s learning?

Questions for school leaders and governors:

1. Why is drama important in your school?
2. Where does or can drama provision:
a. contribute to the ethos and cultural offer of the school?
b. contribute to children’s social, moral, spiritual and cultural development?
c. involve and motivate children so that they develop as expressive, creative and confident learners through making, performing and appreciating drama and theatre?
d. involve children in active learning, with opportunities for independent learning, making drama with others, problem solving and decision making?
3. How do you assess the quality and the impact of the drama offer on children’s learning?

Questions for school leaders and governors:

1. Why is music important in your school?
2. Where does or can music provision:
a. contribute to the ethos and cultural offer of the school?
b. contribute to children’s social, moral, spiritual and cultural development?
c. involve and motivate children so that they develop as expressive, creative and confident young musicians through composing, improvising, singing, playing, listening and analysing music?
d. involve children in active learning, with opportunities for independent learning, making music with others, problem solving and decision making?
3. How do you assess the quality and the impact of the music offer on children’s learning?


Questions for school leaders and governors:

Why is dance important in your school?
Where does or can dance provision:
contribute to the ethos and cultural offer of the school?
contribute to children’s social, moral, spiritual and cultural development?
involve and motivate children so that they develop as expressive, creative and confident young dancers through the interrelated processes of performing, composing and appreciating dance?
involve children in active learning, with opportunities for independent learning, making dance with others, problem solving and decision making?
How do you assess the quality and the impact of the dance offer on children’s learning?

real world, creative, connections between subjects in schools
Politics
Party manifestos
Ask your MP
1. Committed national and local leadership

• Local and Regional coordinated Cultural Learning Strategy and Delivery Plans
• A National Plan for Cultural Learning
• Learning trustee for publically funded cultural organisations

2. New guidance from Ofsted
Ofsted inspections should be required to recognise and comment on the quality of arts and cultural learning in their reports.

There must be new guidance from Ofsted that no School, Academy, Youth Service or Children’s Centre be judged beyond ‘requires improvement’ unless it offers a broad and balanced curriculum that includes the arts and culture.

3. The extension of STEM to STEAM

4. Improved teacher training and development

• An expansion of the number of teacher training places in Arts subjects, to reverse the 42% decrease in Art & Design, Dance, Drama and Music places since 2010.
• An expansion of the recruitment drive for STEM subjects to include the arts to meet the increased demand for STEAM teachers.
• Requirements for the development of effective teaching and learning in arts subjects both as specialism for whole child development and to contribute to STEAM. This could be delivered by teaching schools.


5. High quality, industry-endorsed careers advice and guidance
Every young person must have the opportunity to access high quality, industry-endorsed careers advice and guidance about working in the creative and cultural industries.

Ask your parents to ask their MPs
www.culturallearningallinace.org.uk
Full transcript