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Sad Superheros: Compassion Fatigue and Self-Care

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by

Joshua Thurmond

on 27 April 2012

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Transcript of Sad Superheros: Compassion Fatigue and Self-Care

Vicarious Trauma
Negative, secondary effect/trauma which is caused by repeatedly hearing horrible stories about extremely stressful events.
This is Normal.
What is Trauma?
An emotional wound or shock that creates substantial, lasting damage to the psychological development of a person, often leading to neurosis.

Situational Trauma:

Trauma can be caused by man-made and natural disasters, including war, abuse, violence, earthquakes, mechanized accidents (car, train, or plane crashes, etc.) or medical emergencies.

Historical Trauma:

Historical trauma is cumulative emotional and psychological wounding over the lifespan and across generations, emanating from massive group trauma.
The
Causes
of
Trauma
What is Compassion Fatigue?
The Strain that service providers experience while working with trauma victims.

A natural behavior and emotion that comes from knowing about a traumatizing event experience by another.

The negative effects from trauma transposed from victim to service provider, family, or friend who is assisting and supporting a victim.
Symptoms of Compassion Fatigue
Intrusive thoughts
Nightmares
Generalized anxiety
Sadness
Depression
Sleeplessness, insomnia
Sleeping too much
Physical Ailments
Grouchy disposition
Negative attitude
Physical Fatigue
Feeling the work you do is useless or futile
Acceptance
Recognizing and accepting that Compassion Fatigue is a natural occupational hazard of trauma work is an essential first step in developing healthy work habits.
Keys For Coping: The Basics
Get Enough Sleep
Eat Right
Exercise
Create Strong Social Support
Take up a Hobbie
Take Time to Relax
STRESSES FOR YOU?
Balancing Job and Family-children, grandchildren, single parent, child care

Job Stress-budgets, supervisor/boss (are you one?); co-workers, what is your job?

Financial – Work- Personal

Stress Management Inventory
5 Impacts of Trauma
Physical
Mental
Financial
Social
Spiritual
How will you directly mitigate the overall effects of vicarious trauma by focusing on the 5 Impacts?
Expensive Stress Relievers
Vacation
Spa Treatments
Massage
Shopping
Movies (comedies not sad ones!)
Manicure
Pedicure
LOW COST STRESS RELIEVERS
Get Organized
Get in Touch with your Inner Child (bubbles)
Aromatherapy
Stress Stars/Stress Balls
Water Therapy-desk top fountain; physical hydration
Music
Computer Video Games
Pillow-uses, colors
De-stress Your Environment-colors, textures, patterns
NO COST STRESS RELIEVERS
Exercise-relieves stress; works off anger
Breathing Exercises
Power Naps
Humor
Visualization
Crying
Self Talk
Meditation
Yoga
Journaling
NEGATIVE TECHNIQUES
Overeating
TV Escape
Prescription Drugs
Illegal Drugs
Drinking alcohol to excess
Gambling
Shouting/name calling
Cursing
Quitting your job-that’ll show ‘em!
CULTURAL/TRADITIONAL STRESS RELIEVERS
SWEAT LODGES
SMUDGING
BRUSHING
HERB THERAPY
DANCING, POW WOWS, STOMP DANCES
STORY TELLING
ARTS AND CRAFTS
Make a Yearly Plan
P R O F E S S I O N A L Q U A L I T Y O F L I F E S C A L E ( P R O Q O L )
Take the Test!
http://www.proqol.org
What are my VT mitigation goals for:
(and stick to it)
Physical Health: (Weight loss, new sport/hobbie, exercise routine)?

Mental Health: (Improve my PROQOL Score, take more breaks, pet more puppies)?

Financial Health: (Get my budget in order, save more, invest, control my charitable giving)?

Social Health: (Reconnect with loved ones, find new groups and clubs, check out social media)?

Spiritual Heath: (Affirm faith, self-actualization, meditation)?
Name one thing you can do right now for each category!
Health-building activities such as exercise, massage, yoga, meditation.

• Eating healthy foods

• Drinking plenty of water

• Use natural healing products to care for and heal your body

• Practicing the art of self-management. Just say no

• Developing a healthy support system: people who contribute to your self esteem, people who listen well, people who care

• Organizing your life so you become proactive as opposed to reactive

• Reserving your life energy for worthy causes. Choose your battles.

• Living a balanced life: Sing, dance, sit with silence
Remember!
Resources:
Compassion Fatigue Awareness Project
http://www.compassionfatigue.org/index.html
Healthy Place Compassion Fatigue Test
http://www.healthyplace.com/psychological-tests/compassion-fatigue-self-assessment/
Understanding and Addressing Vicarious Trauma
http://www.headington-institute.org/Default.aspx?tabid=2650
Burnout
http://www.irct.org/Files/Filer/TortureJournal/16_1_2006/page_1-9.pdf
Thank you!
Dr. Maria Yellow Horse Braveheart, PhD
American Indians and Crime

· The rate of violent crime estimated from self-reported victimizations for American Indians is well above that of other U.S. racial or ethnic groups and is more than twice the national average.
· Native Americans experience 1 violent crime per 10 residents
· The violent crime rate in every age group below age 35 was significantly higher for American Indians than for all persons.
· Rates of violent victimization for both males and females were higher for American Indians than for all races.
· The rate of violent victimization among American Indian women was more than double that among all women.

Youth Victimization: Prevalence and Implications

· Native American Youth had the highest rates of sexual violence (15.7%) and physical abuse (27.3%) victimization
· Native American Youth had the 2nd highest rate of witnessing violence (55.7%) with black adolescents as the highest group (57.2%)

(Department of Justice Report, 2004)
http://bjs.ojp.usdoj.gov/content/pub/pdf/aic02.pdf


(NIJ Study, April 2003) – looked at Native American, White, Black, Hispanic and Asian youth from 12-17yo
https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/194972.pdf
American Indians and Crime
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