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The Roles & Supervisions of Paraprofessionals

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Amanda Cation

on 17 October 2013

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Transcript of The Roles & Supervisions of Paraprofessionals

Group 1:
Kelsey, Ruth,
Nicole, & Amanda
Roles & Supervisions of Paraprofessionals
Enter at your own risk!
Paraprofessional Presentation
One-to-one instruction
Small/Large group instruction
Data collection/observation
Preparation/planning
Attend meetings
Storytelling/reading aloud
Making instructional materials
Behavior Management
Supervision (lunch, hall, playground, etc.)
The Roles
Paraprofessionals can add organization and support to children in educational settings.
Role descriptions vary from district to district. However, teachers should be providing quality explanations of roles for the paraprofessionals working in their classrooms.
The Roles
Why?
Paraprofessionals will know expectations
Teachers will be setting the tone for professionalism
Efficient instruction will be given to students
Resources
French, N. (2003). Paraeducators in special education programs. Focus on Exceptional Children, 36(2), 1-3.


Pickett, A. L. (1997). A training program to prepare teachers to supervise and work more effectively with paraprofessional personnel. National Resource Center for Paraprofessionals. www.nrcpara.org


Tews, L. and Lupart, J. (2008). Students with disabilities' perspectives of the role and impact of paraprofessionals in inclusive educational settings. Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, 5 (1), 39-46.


Ziff, B. (2010). Working with the paraprofessional in your classroom. California State University Los Angeles: Helpful Hints Series, (10), Retrieved from http://www.calstatela.edu/centers/spedintern/hints10theparaprofessional.pdf
Article: Student perspectives revealed "four relationship styles consisting of the paraprofessional as mother, friend, protector, and primary teacher" (40).
Supervision of Paraprofessionals
Teachers and para-educators work to promote the academic and socioemotional well-being of all students

Requires a well organized classroom

Includes a plan for all adults
Article: Some of the current trends in roles include:
"Providing instruction in academic subjects
Supporting students with challenging behaviors
Providing personal care
Facilitating peer interaction
Collecting and managing data about the students" (39).
Article: Teamwork allows people to discuss their work together, and as a result, to grow professionally. To be successful, the teacher and para-educator must view themselves as a team and partners in the educational process.

Training Resources
Managing Para-Educators in Your School: How to hire, train, and supervise para-educators
Colleagues in the Classroom: A video assisted program for teaching supervision skills
Supervising Para-Educators: A team approach
Training Resources
Offer evidence-based strategies for supporting para-educators in classroom settings
More Issues...
www.nrcpara.org
A training program to prepare teachers to supervise and work more effectively with paraprofessional personnel.
A core curriculum and training program to prepare para-educators to work in inclusive classrooms serving school-aged students with disabilities.
Offer evidence-based strategies for supporting para-educators in classroom settings
A study by French (2003) lists more potential problems of para-educators in an inclusion setting:
Teacher may entrust para-educator with more responsibility for a student's learning than is ethically correct
"Training Trap" --> assuming whatever training para-educators have is sufficient enough for taking on full responsibility for students in special education
Para-educators are there to keep students with special needs from 'bothering' the teacher
(French, 2003)
What Are the Issues?
Few teacher education programs offer courses that prepare teachers to supervise other adults
Instructors have limited real-life experience --> result to using hypothetical situations
New teachers struggle with collaborating and supervising
A Training Tip: How to maintain effective adult plans early on
Once paraprofessionals receive virtually any amount of
training (usually equivalent to a single college-level
course), many teachers often feel justified in relinquishing
instructional responsibilities to them, often claiming to be uncomfortable with
instructing students with disabilities because they are "not trained" in special education. BUT most teachers are far
better trained to educate a student with a disability than are most
paraprofessionals.
Tip: One way you can proactively promote a professional and collaborative atmosphere is through preparing a notebook for the paraprofessional. Include...

• Philosophical overview
• Classroom management strategies
• Important phone numbers
• Emergency procedures
• Yearly calendar
• Weekly schedule
• Daily schedule
• Classroom rules
• TA’s role and responsibilities
• Significant names and function of school personnel
• Bibliography of significant and useful books and resources
• Information about issues related to the area being served
• Information the teacher feels is important to the setting
*Ziff, B. (2010). Working with the paraprofessional in your classroom. California State University Los Angeles: Helpful Hints Series, (10), Retrieved from http://www.calstatela.edu/centers/spedintern/hints10theparaprofessional.pdf
http://www.uvm.edu/~cdci/evolve/working.pdf
More on "The Training Trap"
The bottom line:
Teachers should not underestimate the importance of their existing skills for educating students with disabilities!

"The principles of teaching and learning do
not change when a student is labeled with a disability. Teachers can be successful by stretching, individualizing, and intensifying many of the
same approaches that they have used for years.
Then share those with the paraprofessionals!"
-Dr. Michael Giangreco
Full transcript