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Copy of Great Gatsby Close Reads

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Kerri Bury

on 2 April 2013

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Transcript of Copy of Great Gatsby Close Reads

Readers Make Meaning out of What they Read As you read look for passages and lines that seem important. Look for the following:
Action
Dialogue
Descriptions that reveal something about Character or Motivation. Think about your own habits (Metacognative)
Do you have to go back?
Are you confused?
Do you ever feel like you're in the story or "into" it? As you read think about these questions: Does the narrator's voice help you or confuse you? How interesting or engaging is the main or any other character? Do you care about him/her? Who is telling the story? Write Them in Your WNB I lived at West Egg, the — well, the less fashionable of the two, though this is a most superficial tag to express the bizarre and not a little sinister contrast between them. my house was at the very tip of the egg, only fifty yards from the Sound, and squeezed between two huge places that rented for twelve or fifteen thousand a season. the one on my right was a colossal affair by any standard — it was a factual imitation of some Hotel de Ville in Normandy, with a tower on one side, spanking new under a thin beard of raw ivy, and a marble swimming pool, and more than forty acres of lawn and garden. it was Gatsby’s mansion. Or, rather, as I didn’t know Mr. Gatsby, it was a mansion inhabited by a gentleman of that name. My own house was an eyesore, but it was a small eyesore, and it had been overlooked, so I had a view of the water, a partial view of my neighbor’s lawn, and the consoling proximity of millionaires — all for eighty dollars a month (9-10). Look for the following:
Action
Dialogue
Descriptions that reveal something about Character or Motivation. Descriptions that reval something about Character or Motivation. Voice of the narrator-how does he talk? Well, he admits that he lives in the "less fashionable" 'hood. Does that stuff matter to him? "Sinister" is an odd word here. It means evil. Narrator's house is "squeezed" between two huge places.
Why does he say it like that? Is he going to get "squeezed" by some thing else? "superficial" and "Sinister" alliteration. Is he saying that these two places are those things? Sutre seems like it. Why is his crappy little "cardboard" house even here? He calls it an "eyesore." Is he embarrased? Gatsby's house is an "imitation" of some French palace. Why would he build a new house to look like an old one? His house has a "thin beard of raw ivy" "thin" and "raw" sounds new. Ivy covers or hides things but this is "thin beard" does that mean it's a bad disguise? What's he hiding? Who "overlooked" his house? He seems to hint that there are a lot of competition to show how wealthy you are. There are a lot of DIVISIONS or separations in this whole chapter--FIND THEM and add them to your bookmarks!

What are the DIVISIONS you see around AHS? By Wednesday, jot five examples in your WNB...but don't "label" the division...instead, explain/show it. Doesn't know G' yet. "bizzare" is also an odd choice. Close Reading:
Writers look carefully at how other writers write and construct sentences. What am I looking for? Chapter One You can find all of this on Prezi.com by searching for
ahs gatsby character project Project Outline:
It is your group's job to collect artifacts that create a clear picture of your character. To do that you will gather examples in each different catagories. If it doesn't say how many examples you need, assume that 3 is the minimum required. Points will be awarded for completness, creativity and accuracy. Be prepared to explain and defend all of your choices in a reflective essay. write this part down so you can find it later And so it happened that on a warm windy evening I drove over to East Egg to see two old friends whom I scarcely knew at all. Their house was even more elaborate than I expected, a cheerful red-and-white Georgian Colonial mansion, overlooking the bay. The lawn started at the beach and ran toward the front door for a quarter of a mile, jumping over sun-dials and brick walks and burning gardens — finally when it reached the house drifting up the side in bright vines as though from the momentum of its run. The front was broken by a line of French windows, glowing now with reflected gold and wide open to the warm windy afternoon, and Tom Buchanan in riding clothes was standing with his legs apart on the front porch.

He had changed since his New Haven years. Now he was a sturdy straw-haired man of thirty with a rather hard mouth and a supercilious manner. Two shining arrogant eyes had established dominance over his face and gave him the appearance of always leaning aggressively forward. Not even the effeminate swank of his riding clothes could hide the enormous power of that body — he seemed to fill those glistening boots until he strained the top lacing, and you could see a great pack of muscle shifting when his shoulder moved under his thin coat. It was a body capable of enormous leverage — a cruel body (10-11). "Old friends whom I scarcely knew": that's an oxymoron. Their mansion is not like Gatsby's. It's "Gorgian colonial" whatever that is. But it's not an "imitation" like G's place. Wow, this place is huge: a "quarter mile of lawn," "brick walks," and "burning gardens" The lawn "ran" and "jumps" over stuff. It's unstoppable. Riding clothes, legs apart, this guy wants to make an impression. "sturdy straw-haired", "supercilious,"
"shining" alliteration again. "arrogant" "appearance" "aggressively" more alliteration what do these words tell me about Tom? "pack of muscle" and a "cruel body"
What does it mean to have a cruel body? Look at it again. This time look for references to color, direct and indirect. red-and white
sun
bright
glowing
gold
straw haired
shining This is what I found. What do the have in common? What do they make you think of? What's the dominate tone? Take a seat please.
You have a quiz today! Homework:
Due Monday "At the Door"
Read, record in your reading log and Bookmark Chapter 3
Start keeping track of references to:
Color
Seperations/Divisions
Characterization and Description of your character.

Use one of your observations and write a short piece-8-10 sentences- in your WNB describing a situation where that division occurs but you can not say what the division is. It has to be described rather than stated. While you're waiting write down your homework for the weekend Chapter One Commentary Commentary About the Eyes of Dr. T.J.E.
(start at 1:00) Find the liteary techniques and references to color. Now put the passage about Tom and his house next to the one bout G's House and the one about the Valley of Ashes. Based on where the people live what characteristics do they have?
What's the difference between the 3 areas and how does Fitzgerald show us? You have a quiz on Chapters 1-4.
Study

Your Homework is to read chapter 6 by Monday
Continue keeping 3 sets of book marks
Color
Divisions
Characters This last part is really wierd. What's up with the sign? The bottle of whiskey — a second one — was now in constant demand by all present, excepting Catherine, who “felt just as good on nothing at all.” Tom rang for the janitor and sent him for some celebrated sandwiches, which were a complete supper in themselves. I wanted to get out and walk southward toward the park through the soft twilight, but each time I tried to go I became entangled in some wild, strident argument which pulled me back, as if with ropes, into my chair. Yet high over the city our line of yellow windows must have contributed their share of human secrecy to the casual watcher in the darkening streets, and I was him too, looking up and wondering. I was within and without, simultaneously enchanted and repelled by the inexhaustible variety of life. The little dog was sitting on the table looking with blind eyes through the smoke, and from time to time groaning faintly. People disappeared, reappeared, made plans to go somewhere, and then lost each other, searched for each other, found each other a few feet away. Some time toward midnight Tom Buchanan and Mrs. Wilson stood face to face discussing, in impassioned voices, whether Mrs. Wilson had any right to mention Daisy’s name.
“Daisy! Daisy! Daisy!” shouted Mrs. Wilson. “I’ll say it whenever I want to! Daisy! Dai ——”
Making a short deft movement, Tom Buchanan broke her nose with his open hand.

Now draw all of the things that the eyes could "see" literally.

What else does "see" mean?

What could the eyes stand for? Lets talk about this chapter:
What can you tell me about Tom?
What can you say about Nick?
Whay does Myrtle stay with Tom? There was music from my neighbor’s house through the summer nights. In his blue gardens men and girls came and went like moths among the whisperings and the champagne and the stars. At high tide in the afternoon I watched his guests diving from the tower of his raft, or taking the sun on the hot sand of his beach while his two motor-boats slit the waters of the Sound, drawing aquaplanes over cataracts of foam. On week-ends his Rolls-Royce became an omnibus, bearing parties to and from the city between nine in the morning and long past midnight, while his station wagon scampered like a brisk yellow bug to meet all trains. And on Mondays eight servants, including an extra gardener, toiled all day with mops and scrubbing-brushes and hammers and garden-shears, repairing the ravages of the night before.
Every Friday five crates of oranges and lemons arrived from a fruiterer in New York — every Monday these same oranges and lemons left his back door in a pyramid of pulpless halves. There was a machine in the kitchen which could extract the juice of two hundred oranges in half an hour if a little button was pressed two hundred times by a butler’s thumb. Chapter 3: nick Meets Gatsby
He smiled understandingly — much more than understandingly. It was one of those rare smiles with a quality of eternal reassurance in it, that you may come across four or five times in life. It faced — or seemed to face — the whole external world for an instant, and then concentrated on you with an irresistible prejudice in your favor. It understood you just so far as you wanted to be understood, believed in you as you would like to believe in yourself, and assured you that it had precisely the impression of you that, at your best, you hoped to convey.

Precisely at that point it vanished — and I was looking at an elegant young rough-neck, a year or two over thirty, whose elaborate formality of speech just missed being absurd. Some time before he introduced himself I’d got a strong impression that he was picking his words with care.

Almost at the moment when Mr. Gatsby identified himself, a butler hurried toward him with the information that Chicago was calling him on the wire. He excused himself with a small bow that included each of us in turn.

“If you want anything just ask for it, old sport,” he urged me. “Excuse me. I will rejoin you later.” Look for divisions, colors and if you're clever, pronouns. Pick up the two excerpts and with your chracter group go through them closely.
Yor Homework is to read Chapter 7 by Wednesday and continue the book marks. If you split this here you get two versions of Gatsby. Make a chart and list the lines that characterize him. Then make a claim at the bottom of each list. Gatsby in the first part Gatsby in the second part Claim: Claim: He wanted nothing less of Daisy than that she should go to Tom and say: “I never loved you.” After she had obliterated four years with that sentence they could decide upon the more practical measures to be taken. One of them was that, after she was free, they were to go back to Louisville and be married from her house — just as if it were five years ago.
“And she doesn’t understand,” he said. “She used to be able to understand. We’d sit for hours ——”
He broke off and began to walk up and down a desolate path of fruit rinds and discarded favors and crushed flowers.
“I wouldn’t ask too much of her,” I ventured. “You can’t repeat the past.”
“Can’t repeat the past?” he cried incredulously. “Why of course you can!”
He looked around him wildly, as if the past were lurking here in the shadow of his house, just out of reach of his hand.
“I’m going to fix everything just the way it was before,” he said, nodding determinedly. “She’ll see.”
He talked a lot about the past, and I gathered that he wanted to recover something, some idea of himself perhaps, that had gone into loving Daisy. His life had been confused and disordered since then, but if he could once return to a certain starting place and go over it all slowly, he could find out what that thing was. . . .
. . . One autumn night, five years before, they had been walking down the street when the leaves were falling, and they came to a place where there were no trees and the sidewalk was white with moonlight. They stopped here and turned toward each other. Now it was a cool night with that mysterious excitement in it which comes at the two changes of the year. The quiet lights in the houses were humming out into the darkness and there was a stir and bustle among the stars. Out of the corner of his eye Gatsby saw that the blocks of the sidewalks really formed a ladder and mounted to a secret place above the trees — he could climb to it, if he climbed alone, and once there he could suck on the pap of life, gulp down the incomparable milk of wonder.
His heart beat faster and faster as Daisy’s white face came up to his own. He knew that when he kissed this girl, and forever wed his unutterable visions to her perishable breath, his mind would never romp again like the mind of God. So he waited, listening for a moment longer to the tuning-fork that had been struck upon a star. Then he kissed her. At his lips’ touch she blossomed for him like a flower and the incarnation was complete.
Through all he said, even through his appalling sentimentality, I was reminded of something — an elusive rhythm, a fragment of lost words, that I had heard somewhere a long time ago. For a moment a phrase tried to take shape in my mouth and my lips parted like a dumb man’s, as though there was more struggling upon them than a wisp of startled air. But they made no sound, and what I had almost remembered was uncommunicable forever. Chapter 6
Reinvention
Will the "real" Gatsby please Stand up.
James Gatz becomes Jay Gatsby Tom was evidently perturbed at Daisy’s running around alone, for on the following Saturday night he came with her to Gatsby’s party. Perhaps his presence gave the evening its peculiar quality of oppressiveness — it stands out in my memory from Gatsby’s other parties that summer. There were the same people, or at least the same sort of people, the same profusion of champagne, the same many-colored, many-keyed commotion, but I felt an unpleasantness in the air, a pervading harshness that hadn’t been there before. Or perhaps I had merely grown used to it, grown to accept West Egg as a world complete in itself, with its own standards and its own great figures, second to nothing because it had no consciousness of being so, and now I was looking at it again, through Daisy’s eyes. It is invariably saddening to look through new eyes at things upon which you have expended your own powers of adjustment. Trade Letters with someone.
Read the letter, then write a short, 4-6 sentence response to it. Collect last lines of chapters
repeated words
Tighten up the units
Teach the writing between reading chapters-you have 2 days to read chapter 3 take on of those days to teach a paragraph type.

USe the plot note cards for each chapter.
Use the movie or a children's book. Where the Wild Things Are=good text for modeling. Notes Form CC March 22 There are 4 parts of Chapter 7. Pick one and workining with a prtner or two, rewrite it as a short play. That is write the dialog and decide how and where people will move. Due Monday-be prepared to Act it out. Part One
At The Buchananan Mansion Part Two
The Hotel Room Part 3 the Car and the "Accident"
This one needs to be staged in two acts.
The Car and After Part 4 Nick and Gatsby Talk The Great Gatsby
Close Reads

GREEN

GOLD

WHITE

SILVER

RED

YELLOW 1.Brainstorm images and ideas that come to mind for the following colors: 2. What alternative names are used for these colors? (For example, red is sometimes called crimson). Keep Track of the following:
Colors
Opposites or Pairs
Money/Wealth Bookmarks Direct Quote w/ page number: COLORS as SYMBOLS PRE-READING COPY THIS CHART INTO YOUR WNB: SEE THINK WONDER SEE:
Look at the cover of The Great Gatsby. What do you actually SEE?

In the "See" column, jot the details you notice. Do not make any judgements/assumption.
Number each thing you see. THINK:
For each of the details you noticed and then wrote in the "see" column, write what you think it could mean.
Each number from the "see" column should have a corresponding thought in the "think" column! WONDER:
What do you wonder about each of the details you saw and thought about?

Make a prediction or give an analysis of each. Example:

I see a picture of a KID.

I think that kid belongs to my teacher.

I wonder what the kid's name is and how old the kid is. If we were doing this SEE THINK WONDER activity using the objects in my classroom. Category: Color/Opposites/Pairs/Wealth

Commentary/Reaction: 6 Per Chapter!
That is one complete bookmarking sheet.
Fold it in thirds, and it will fit in the book nicely. "I Will Wait" by Mumford and Sons In your WNB, jot the title and some lyrics you know of a song that speak of unrequited love, love gone wrong, a lover's heartbreaks, etc. CHAPTER ONE
Close Reads Already it was deep summer on roadhouse roofs and in front of wayside garages, where new red gas-pumps sat out in pools of light, and when I reached my estate at West Egg I ran the car under its shed and sat for a while on an abandoned grass roller in the yard. The wind had blown off, leaving a loud, bright night, with wings beating in the trees and a persistent organ sound as the full bellows of the earth blew the frogs full of life. The silhouette of a moving cat wavered across the moonlight, and turning my head to watch it, I saw that I was not alone fifty feet away a figure had emerged from the shadow of my neighbor’s mansion and was standing with his hands in his pockets regarding the silver pepper of the stars. Something in his leisurely movements and the secure position of his feet upon the lawn suggested that it was Mr. Gatsby himself, come out to determine what share was his of our local heavens.

I decided to call to him. Miss Baker had mentioned him at dinner, and that would do for an introduction. But I didn’t call to him, for he gave a sudden intimation that he was content to be alone he stretched out his arms toward the dark water in a curious way, and, far as I was from him, I could have sworn he was trembling. Involuntarily I glanced seaward and distinguished nothing except a single green light, minute and far away, that might have been the end of a dock. When I looked once more for Gatsby he had vanished, and I was alone again in the unquiet darkness. The Great Gatsby Hotel de Ville Georgian Mansion Most famous Georgian... The Eggs DAisy's Lullaby (City Hall) I lived at West Egg, the — well, the less fashionable of the two, though this is a most superficial tag to express the bizarre and not a little sinister contrast between them. my house was at the very tip of the egg, only fifty yards from the Sound, and squeezed between two huge places that rented for twelve or fifteen thousand a season. the one on my right was a colossal affair by any standard — it was a factual imitation of some Hotel de Ville in Normandy, with a tower on one side, spanking new under a thin beard of raw ivy, and a marble swimming pool, and more than forty acres of lawn and garden. it was Gatsby’s mansion. Or, rather, as I didn’t know Mr. Gatsby, it was a mansion inhabited by a gentleman of that name. My own house was an eyesore, but it was a small eyesore, and it had been overlooked, so I had a view of the water, a partial view of my neighbor’s lawn, and the consoling proximity of millionaires — all for eighty dollars a month (9-10). Take a look at this chunk of text from our book. Use the "See, Think, Wonder" technique we used on the cover to look closely at the writer's way of writing. Talk back to the text. Ask questions in the margins. See what you can find. Here's what I got. It doesn't mean this is "right" or the only way to read this. It's just my own ideas. CHAPTER TWO
CLOSE READS THE VALLEY OF ASHES

About half way between West Egg and New York the motor road hastily joins the railroad and runs beside it for a quarter of a mile, so as to shrink away from a certain desolate area of land. This is a valley of ashes — a fantastic farm where ashes grow like wheat into ridges and hills and grotesque gardens; where ashes take the forms of houses and chimneys and rising smoke and, finally, with a transcendent effort, of men who move dimly and already crumbling through the powdery air. Occasionally a line of gray cars crawls along an invisible track, gives out a ghastly creak, and comes to rest, and immediately the ash-gray men swarm up with leaden spades and stir up an impenetrable cloud, which screens their obscure operations from your sight. But above the gray land and the spasms of bleak dust which drift endlessly over it, you perceive, after a moment, the eyes of Doctor T. J. Eckleburg. The eyes of Doctor T. J. Eckleburg are blue and gigantic — their irises are one yard high. They look out of no face, but, instead, from a pair of enormous yellow spectacles which pass over a nonexistent nose. Evidently some wild wag of an oculist set them there to fatten his practice in the borough of Queens, and then sank down himself into eternal blindness, or forgot them and moved away. But his eyes, dimmed a little by many paintless days, under sun and rain, brood on over the solemn dumping ground.

The valley of ashes is bounded on one side by a small foul river, and, when the drawbridge is up to let barges through, the passengers on waiting trains can stare at the dismal scene for as long as half an hour. There is always a halt there of at least a minute, and it was because of this that I first met Tom Buchanan’s mistress. Corona Dump, Queens, NY 1.What images does Nick associate with the setting of George Wilson’s garage?

2.On a literal level, what area of the city is Nick describing?

3.How does Myrtle’s life seem to differ from Daisy’s? Why would Tom want a woman like Myrtle as a mistress?

4.What are the eyes of Dr. T.J. Eckleburg? Draw them in your notebook. GIVE IT ITS OWN PAGE. CHAPTER THREE
CLOSE READS WNB Entry:
At the end of Chapter 3, Nick says, "Everyone suspects himself at of least one of the cardinal virtues and this is mine: I am one of the few honest people that I have ever known" (64).

React to Nick's assertion about himself. *Is* he honest? Explain.
What is your "cardinal virtue"?

CLASSIC CARDINAL VIRTUES: The four paramount virtues in classical philosophy:
Justice: Desire to see right prevail and to give each person his right.
Prudence: Ability to judge the appropriateness of actions in any given circumstance.
Fortitude: Ability to confront fear, to endure.
Temperance: Practicing self-control and moderation. Over the great bridge, with the sunlight through the girders making a constant flicker upon the moving cars, with the city rising up across the river in white heaps and sugar lumps all built with a wish out of non-olfactory money. The city seen from the Queensboro Bridge is always the city seen for the first time, in its first wild promise of all the mystery and the beauty in the world.

A dead man passed us in a hearse heaped with blooms, followed by two carriages with drawn blinds, and by more cheerful carriages for friends. The friends looked out at us with the tragic eyes and short upper lips of southeastern Europe, and I was glad that the sight of Gatsby’s splendid car was included in their sombre holiday. As we crossed Blackwell’s Island a limousine passed us, driven by a white chauffeur, in which sat three modish negroes, two bucks and a girl. I laughed aloud as the yolks of their eyeballs rolled toward us in haughty rivalry.

“Anything can happen now that we’ve slid over this bridge,” I thought; “anything at all. . . . ” Chapter 4 Close Read Please find a partner You are going to take a quiz on Part 1. Chapter 4 can be broken up into two parts. Choose wisely. When you are finished, please turn your quiz in on my cabinet. Pick up a copy of Close Read #8. Over the great bridge, with the sunlight through the girders making a constant flicker upon the moving cars, with the city rising up across the river in white heaps and sugar lumps all built with a wish out of non-olfactory money. The city seen from the Queensboro Bridge is always the city seen for the first time, in its first wild promise of all the mystery and the beauty in the world.

A dead man passed us in a hearse heaped with blooms, followed by two carriages with drawn blinds, and by more cheerful carriages for friends. The friends looked out at us with the tragic eyes and short upper lips of southeastern Europe, and I was glad that the sight of Gatsby’s splendid car was included in their sombre holiday. As we crossed Blackwell’s Island a limousine passed us, driven by a white chauffeur, in which sat three modish negroes, two bucks and a girl. I laughed aloud as the yolks of their eyeballs rolled toward us in haughty rivalry.

“Anything can happen now that we’ve slid over this bridge,” I thought; “anything at all. . . . ” So he's not talking about the Brooklyn Bridge Things are always moving in this city; no one stops. Again, movement. What is that?!? I know that olfactory is your sense of smell... Close Read #8- New York City Eloquently described...hopeful? New life...new beginnings? Immigrants?? What was NYC to immigrants? The 'gateway' to hopes and dreams? The land of opportunity? A place to attain 'The American Dream'? Why would a car cheer them up? Irony? This is a racist comment-- it refers to breeding and hints at black minstrel shows. Again, racist comments, the whites of their eyes against black skin. How are they "rivals"? The Great Migration! Why does Nick think this? After everything he's seen while crossing the bridge, why this is the thought that travels through his mind? New York City is a machine--things are always moving, they are constantly in motion...how does this differ from East and West Egg? Why is New York City the place where dreams come true? Reinvention? Reinvention? Think of movies that you've seen where the main character(s) decide to go somewhere in order to reinvent themselves or accomplish a dream. Where do we "GO" when we want something? What places? Chapter Five
Close Reads In addition to the usual (colors, opposites, pairs, wealth, characterization, cars, eyes), look for the following in your passage:
Weather
Water-related words/ideas
Time
Pay attention to how Gatsby and Daisy change...or don't.

If there is a word or allusion in your close read you do not know, LOOK IT UP. It matters to your understanding of what is literally happening in the scene and what Fitzgerald is trying to "do" through diction and literary devices. Turn and Talk:
After hearing the back story of Gatsby's HOUSE (the close read in which we learn that a brewer built the house a decade ago), discuss how this description compares to what we already know about the Gatsby mansion. Now discuss:
What other "back stories" have we learned so far?
About whom do we NOT know the back story?
Does Fitzgerald assign a back story to each of his main characters? Today you will do a close read with your geographical partner. There are six different close read passages from chapter five that will be distributed. Partners will have the same close read passage as a few other teams.
Once time is called, we will "jigsaw" the close reads together, with a spokesperson from each partnership walking us through the close read under the ELMO. Group #1 Passage: "The day agreed upon..." (88).
Group #2 Passage: "The rain cooled..." (89).
Group #3 Passage: "Under the dripping..." (90).
Group #4 Passage: "She turned her head..." (91).
Group #5 Passage: "Gatsby, his hand still..." (91).
Group #6 Passage: "I walked out back..." (93). His bedroom was the simplest room of all — except where the dresser was garnished with a toilet set of pure dull gold. Daisy took the brush with delight, and smoothed her hair, whereupon Gatsby sat down and shaded his eyes and began to laugh.
“It’s the funniest thing, old sport,” he said hilariously. “I can’t — When I try to ——”
He had passed visibly through two states and was entering upon a third. [What are these three states?]



After his embarrassment and his unreasoning joy he was consumed with wonder at her presence. He had been full of the idea so long, dreamed it right through to the end, waited with his teeth set, so to speak, at an inconceivable pitch of intensity. Now, in the reaction, he was running down like an overwound clock. Recovering himself in a minute he opened for us two hulking patent cabinets which held his massed suits and dressing-gowns and ties, and his shirts, piled like bricks in stacks a dozen high.
“I’ve got a man in England who buys me clothes. He sends over a selection of things at the beginning of each season, spring and fall.”
He took out a pile of shirts and began throwing them, one by one, before us, shirts of sheer linen and thick silk and fine flannel, which lost their folds as they fell and covered the table in many-colored disarray. While we admired he brought more and the soft rich heap mounted higher — shirts with stripes and scrolls and plaids in coral and apple-green and lavender and faint orange, and monograms of Indian blue. Suddenly, with a strained sound, Daisy bent her head into the shirts and began to cry stormily.

“They’re such beautiful shirts,” she sobbed, her voice muffled in the thick folds. “It makes me sad because I’ve never seen such — such beautiful shirts before.”

After the house, we were to see the grounds and the swimming-pool, and the hydroplane and the mid-summer flowers — but outside Gatsby’s window it began to rain again, so we stood in a row looking at the corrugated surface of the Sound. “If it wasn’t for the mist we could see your home across the bay,” said Gatsby. “You always have a green light that burns all night at the end of your dock.”

Daisy put her arm through his abruptly, but he seemed absorbed in what he had just said. Possibly it had occurred to him that the colossal significance of that light had now vanished forever. Compared to the great distance that had separated him from Daisy it had seemed very near to her, almost touching her. It had seemed as close as a star to the moon. Now it was again a green light on a dock. His count of enchanted objects had diminished by one. Name Symbolism New...Old...
One is "less fashionable"... How closely linked are the
cover and the text? Analyzing the Cover Art and Title of The Great Gatsby Chapter 1:
Daisy’s face was “sad and lovely with bright things in it, bright eyes and a bright passionate mouth.” Choosing a Landscape
and Color Scheme Face and carnival Nocturnal carnival; Gatsby’s place “looks like the World’s Fair” Incorporating face and landscape Face over NYC skyline Face over Long Island Sound Possible Evidence “Don’t give anyone that jacket [cover] you’re saving for me. I’ve written it into the book.” Fitzgerald writes in a letter to editor: Painting to Cover Final cover, 1925 edition Cugat’s final painting, gouache on paper, Princeton University Library Turn,Talk, and Jot
(4 minutes) Chapter 4:
Nick Carraway’s image of Daisy as the “girl whose disembodied face floated along the dark cornices and blinding signs” of New York at night. Unusual “collaboration” between author and jacket artist.
Under normal circumstances, the artist illustrates a scene or motif conceived by the author; he lifts, as it were, his image from a page of the book.
In this instance, however, the artist’s image came before the finished manuscript.
Fitzgerald actually maintained that he had “written it into” his book. But what precisely did he mean by this claim? Francis Cugat painted the cover art for Gatsby in 1925. He was commissioned to paint the piece before the book was even completed.

Little is known about the artist responsible for the most eloquent jacket in American literary history.
He was born in Spain in 1893 and raised in Cuba.
His death date is unknown.
No other Cugat book jackets have been identified. With your partner, talk about examples from the text that you can connect to the cover art. JOT your ideas in your WNB as you talk. The Cover Artist FIRST...
Turn to the beginning of The Great Gatsby section in your WNB.
Find the SEE/THINK/WONDER entry about your initial thoughts about the cover of the novel.
Review this entry in preparation for today's post-analysis of the cover art.

Next...
Jot down your thoughts about the title THE GREAT GATBSY.
Consider: Is Gatsby *really* great? Explain.
What could be Fitzgerald's purpose in calling him "great"? WNB ENTRY And straight from the text: But Wait! Look how it all started... The Lights:
Gatsby parties were illuminated by “enough colored lights to make a Christmas tree of Gatsby’s enormous garden.”

Nick sees “the whole corner of the peninsula . . . blazing with light” from Gatsby’s house “lit from tower to cellar.”

Nick tells Gatsby that his place “looks like the World’s Fair,” Gatsby proposes that they “go to Coney Island.” Gatsby's cover artist gets the working title for the book: AMONG ASH HEAPS AND MILLIONAIRES and he paints these: What does this look like? And what is that floating in the sky? *If Cugat did not have the finished novel before he began drafting the cover, why did he put faces in the sky? Did Fitzgerald write THAT into the book, too, as Dr. T.J. Eckelburg--brooding over the Valley of Ashes? The next sketch Layered together, the final result is the iconic cover we know. It is called, "Celestial Eyes." Turn and Talk Consider the similarities between creating a work of art and creating a story.
*hint* Think about the layers that the artist and writer each apply to his masterpiece. Think about the decision-making process. The Rejected Titles The working titles for the book were
Trimalchio and The Great Gatsby What's wrong with that title? Trimalchio

Trimalchio in West Egg

On the Road to West Egg

Gatsby

Among Ash Heap and Millionaires

Gold-Hatted Gatsby

High Bouncing Lover

Under the Red, White, and Blue WNB Entry Fitzgerald said, “The Great Gatsby is weak because there’s no emphasis even ironically on his greatness or lack of it.”

Agree or disagree with this statement. *Cite evidence from the text to support your opinion.*

Also select a title from the list of rejected titles that, in your opinion, would be the best alternate name for the book. *Explain your decision*. YOUR predictions and observations from the See/Think/Wonder activity before we read: Before we look at rejected titles, let's talk about how we feel about the chosen title, The Great Gatsby.
Does it fit?
What do you make of this word "great" to describe Gatsby? Fiztgerald's own thoughts about it... The Rejects Trimalchio is a character in the 1st century AD Roman work of fiction Satyricon by Petronius.
Trimalchio is a freedman who through hard work and perseverance has attained power and wealth.
Trimalchio is known for throwing lavish dinner parties.
He seeks to impress his guests—the Roman nouveau riche, mostly freedmen—with the ubiquitous excesses seen throughout his dwelling. Chapter 7
"It was when curiosity about Gatsby was at its highest that the lights in his house failed to go on one Saturday night — and, as obscurely as it had begun, his career as Trimalchio was over." OBJECTIVES and AGENDA

1.Closely read (Analyze) the theme, tone, symbolism, and color used in art and its relation to the novel.

2.Connect the process of creating art to the process of writing.

3.Analyze the title and the rejected titles of the novel.

4.Make a claim about the best title for the book, citing specific evidence to support the claim.

Homework: WNB Entry In a 1924 letter, Fitzgerald said, "the burden of The Great Gatsby was the loss of those illusions that give such color to the world that you don't care whether things are true or false as long as they partake of the magical glory." http://www.thefoxisblack.com/2011/01/10/re-covered-books-the-great-gatsby/ Modern covers made for a design competition
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