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Speech Analysis Project

Number 1: Subject, audience, speaker, context, purpose, repetition, parallelism, rhetorical question, antithesis, anaphora.
by

Kathryn Coats

on 17 January 2013

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Transcript of Speech Analysis Project

By: Kathryn Coats and Mason Pedraza Context Speaker Audience Subject Rhetorical Question Speech in the Virginia Convention -Patrick Henry Meeting of the Virginia Convention Richmond, Virginia in what is now known as St. John's Church March 23, 1775 Right before the
American Revolution Patrick Henry Member of the Virginia Convention A Patriot A Christian Holds his audience
in high esteem Politicians Members of the Virginia Convention Purpose Freedom from British rule To convince the Virginia Convention to declare war on the British April 19th, 1775-
Lexington and Concord Anaphora We have petitioned; we have remonstrated; we have supplicated; we have prostrated ourselves before the throne, and have implored its interposition to arrest the tyrannical hands of the ministry and Parliament. Example 1: Example 2: Our petitions have been slighted; our remonstrances have produced additional violence and insult; our supplications have been disregarded; and we have been spurned, with contempt, from the foot of the throne! Example 3: Will it be the next week, or the next year? Will it be when we are totally disarmed, and when a British guard shall be stationed in every house? Example 4: Shall we gather strength by irresolution and inaction? Shall we acquire the means of effectual resistance by lying supinely on our backs and hugging the delusive phantom of hope, until our enemies shall have bound us hand and foot? Example 1: Example 2: Example 3: Example 4: Have we shown ourselves so unwilling to be reconciled that force must be called in to win back our love? Lends emphasis to a point: Patrick Henry is trying to make the members of the Virginia Convention realize that Britain is not acting as if she is going to try to repair relations with the colonies Can gentlemen assign any other possible motive for it? Provokes thought: Patrick Henry is trying to make his audience think, this is a back up question to Example 2. First he is trying to emphasize what the British are doing, and then he asks them for other reasons for their behavior. Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Introduces an opinion: Patrick Henry uses this sentence to lead into his most famous line, "...give me liberty, or give me death!", his opinion is obviously that he would rather die than remain under British rule. Shall we acquire the means of effectual resistance by lying supinely on our backs and hugging the delusive phantom of hope, until our enemies shall have bound us hand and foot? Leads the audience where the author wants to go: Patrick Henry uses this sentence to appeal to his audience's sense of patriotism and independence to get them to see that if they do not fight, this is what the British will do to them. Repetition Parallelism Example 1: We have petitioned; we have remonstrated; we have supplicated; we have prostrated... Example 2: If we wish to be free -- if we mean to preserve inviolate those inestimable privileges for which we have been so long contending--if we mean not basely to abandon the noble struggle in which we have been so long engaged... Antithesis Example 1: Are we disposed to be of the number of those who, having eyes, see not, and, having ears, hear not... Example 3: Will it be the next week, or the next year? Will it be when we are totally disarmed... Example 4: Shall we gather strength by irresolution and inaction? Shall we acquire the means of effectual resistance... Example 2: For my own part, I consider it as nothing less than a question of freedom or slavery... Example 3: ...give me liberty or give me death! The battle, sir, is not to the strong alone; it is to the vigilant, the active, the brave. Besides, sir, we have no election. ...let it come! I repeat it, sir, let it come. ...we must fight! I repeat it, sir, we must fight! The use of sir throughout the entire speech is used to show Patrick Henry's respect for his audience. The End! Example 1: Example 2: Example 3: Example 4: Context Rhetorical Question Speaker Audience Subject Purpose Anaphora Repetition Parallelism Antithesis Definition: 1. The parts of a written or spoken statement that precede or follow a specific word or passage, usually influencing its meaning or effect.
2. The set of circumstances or facts that surround a particular event, situation, etc Definition: A person who speaks formally before an audience; lecturer; orator Definition: The group of spectators at a public event; listeners or viewers collectively, as in attendance at a theater or concert Definition: 1. That which forms a basic matter of thought, discussion, investigation, etc.: a subject of conversation.
2. A motive, cause, or ground: a subject for complaint.
3. The theme of a sermon, book, story, etc. Definition: 1. The reason for which something exists or is done, made, used, etc.
2. An intended or desired result; end; aim; goal.3. Determination; resoluteness.
4. The subject in hand; the point at issue.
5. Practical result, effect, or advantage Definition: Repetition of a word or words at the beginning of two or more successive verses, clauses, or sentences. Definition: 1. A question asked solely to produce an effect or to make an assertion and not to elicit a reply
2. Asking a question with a predictable answer Definition: Definition: 1. Opposition; contrast: the antithesis of right and wrong.
2. The direct opposite (usually followed by of, or, to)
3. The placing of a sentence or one of its parts against another to which it is opposed to form a balanced contrast of ideas
4. The second sentence or part thus set in opposition
5. Using strongly contrasting words, images, or ideas 1. Repeated utterance; reiteration
2. Restating an idea using the same words Definition: Repetition of grammatical structure
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