Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Anna Karenina

No description
by

Kelsey Morton

on 23 January 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Anna Karenina

Anna Karenina Anna Karenina Any Questions? Leo Tolstoy Stiva, Anna's brother, has an affair.
Anna comes to Moscow to reconcile Stiva with his wife, Dolly.
Levin, Stiva's friend, arrives in Moscow with the intention of proposing to Dolly's sister Kitty.
Kitty is in love with Vronsky and expects him to propose, so she rejects Levin.
Vronsky falls in love with Anna at fist sight. Plot: Enters an affair with Vronsky which is soon discovered by her husband.
Karenin, concerned with public opinion, refuses a divorce and forbids her from seeing Vronsky.
Anna discovers she is pregnant, soon falls ill, and calls Vronsky to see her.
Karenin, enraged, travels to Moscow for a divorce lawyer, but upon receiving a message from Anna that she is dying, returns and forgives her. Anna Busies himself with the work of his farm and writing on the subject of agriculture in Russia.
He believes he is over Kitty, but sees her and his love returns.
Grows tired of constantly arguing with the peasants.
He attempts to avoid Kitty, but eventually speaks to her for the first time since his rejection.
Levin proposes again and Kitty accepts. Levin Leaves Moscow and
returns to his farm,
embarassed by
his rejection. Anna Levin Returns to St. Petersburg
and her husband, but is followed there by Vronsky Leo (Lev) Tolstoy Born in 1828
Bases his novels off of actual events in his and others' lives
Wrote two major novels- War and Peace and Anna Karenina- as well as many essays and shorter fiction works. Tolstoy and Anna Karenina Inspired by the death of his neighbor's mistress, who threw herself under a train after being cast off.
Based the character Levin on himself.
Tolsoy suffered depression as a result of a spiritual crisis at the end of writing this novel, and put Levin through the same situation. Anna Travels to Italy with Vronsky, where he eventually grows bored.
They return to Russia, but Anna finds she cannot go out in society.
Instead they inhabit Vronsky's country house, but they still fight over Vronsky's freedom.
They travel to Moscow to request a divorce from Karenin again.
Anna grows paranoid that Vronsky is seeing another woman and their quarrels become worse.
Angry at Vronsky and full of contempt for the people around her, she throws herself under a train. Levin Marries Kitty and is largely happy, though they have a few small arguments.
Levin's brother dies of consumption.
Kitty is discovered to be pregnant and she and Levin return to Moscow.
Their son is born, and Levin is surprised to feel no love towards the infant, only revulsion and pity.
From his brother's death, Levin is unhappy with his lack of faith and searches for meaning in his life.
He finds meaning through living for God
With his mind at peace, Levin realizes his love for his son. Themes Symbols and Foreshadowing Are the ideas and themes expressed in this novel still applicable today?
Why does Levin's story have such a prominent role in the novel? Discussion Questions: Judgement
The merits of marriage and family life
Social reform in Imperial Russia
Exploration of faith
The value of traditional agricultural lifestyles
The conflict between agriculture and technological progress AP Question: Many writers use a country setting to establish values within a work of literature. For example, the country may be a place of virtue and peace or one of primitivism and ignorance. Choose a novel or play in which such a setting plays a significant role. Then write an essay in which you analyze how the country setting functions in the work as a whole.
Full transcript