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History of Mouse

The history of mouse?

Lee Chang Yoon

on 21 April 2010

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Transcript of History of Mouse

History of Mouse The "mouse" was first invented by Tom Cranston, Fred Longstaff and Keynon Taylor. It was invented as a secret military project.
It looks more like a big machine though. A weird looking "mouse" The First Computer Mouse The first computer mouse, held by inventor Douglas Engelbart, showing the wheels that make contact with the working surface The Early Optical Mouse Early optical mice, first demonstrated by two independent inventors in 1980, came in two different varieties:

1. Some, such as those invented by Steve Kirsch of MIT and Mouse Systems Corporation, used an infrared LED and a four-quadrant infrared sensor to detect grid lines printed with infrared absorbing ink on a special metallic surface. Predictive algorithms in the CPU of the mouse calculated the speed and direction over the grid.
2. Others, invented by Richard F. Lyon and sold by Xerox, used a 16-pixel visible-light image sensor with integrated motion detection on the same chipand tracked the motion of light dots in a dark field of a printed paper or similar mouse pad.
An early optical mouse
Modern Optical Mouse Modern surface-independent optical mice work by using an optoelectronic sensor to take successive images of the surface on which the mouse operates. As computing power grew cheaper, it became possible to embed more powerful special-purpose image-processing chips in the mouse itself. This advance enabled the mouse to detect relative motion on a wide variety of surfaces, translating the movement of the mouse into the movement of the cursor and eliminating the need for a special mouse-pad. This advance paved the way for widespread adoption of optical mice. Optical mice illuminate the surface that they track over, using an LED or a laser diode. Changes between one frame and the next are processed by the image processing part of the chip and translated into movement on the two axes using an optical flow estimation algorithm. For example, the Avago Technologies ADNS-2610 optical mouse sensor processes 1512 frames per second: each frame consisting of a rectangular array of 18×18 pixels, and each pixel can sense 64 different levels of gray. Razer DeathAdder processes 6400 frames per second. Laser Mouse
The laser mouse uses an infrared laser diode instead of an LED to illuminate the surface beneath their sensor. As early as 1998, Sun Microsystems provided a laser mouse with their Sun SPARCstation servers and workstations. However, laser mice did not enter the mainstream market until 2004, when Logitech, in partnership with Agilent Technologies, introduced its MX 1000 laser mouse. This mouse uses a small infrared laser instead of an LED and has significantly increased the resolution of the image taken by the mouse. The laser enables around 20 times more surface tracking power to the surface features used for navigation compared to conventional optical mice, via interference effects. A laser mouse
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