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Jacques Cartier & Samuel de Champlain

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Jordan Flegel

on 11 June 2014

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Transcript of Jacques Cartier & Samuel de Champlain

Samuel de Champlain was a french explorer who made many voyages from France to North America in search of a trade route to Asia, and of land for settlers. Champlain explored North America, founded a colony in present-day Canada, Champlain also became known as the "Father of New France."
Who is worse for the well being of future of the first nations people?
In the end we found out that Jacques Cartier was better, and Samuel de Champlain was worse.
Bibliography
Books:
Jacques Cartier
of heat" (it was a hot summer day), Cartier and his men were surrounded by about fifty Native people in birchbark canoes. He nervously fired two shots that made them retreat, but the next day the Mi'kmaqs came back (above), waving animal skins that they traded for axes, beads and knives.
Who is worse for the well being of future of the first nations people?
Jacques Cartier & Samuel de Champlain

Samuel de Champlain
Champlain was eager to explore west of Quebec and establish a fur-trading alliance with the Huron who lived there. That's why in 1609 he agreed to join a war party against their enemies,the Iroquois. On the lake that would later be named for Champlain in today's New York state, Champlain shot three Iroquois with a musket, a weapon the Iroquois had never seen before. From then on, the Iroquois were the enemy of the French.
Jacques Cartier was a French explorer of Breton who claimed what is now Canada for France. Jacques Cartier was the first European to describe the map; the Gulf of Saint Lawrence and the shores of Saint Lawrence River, which he named "The Country of Canada's", after the Iroquois names for the two big settlements he saw at Stadacona (Quebec City) and at Hochelaga (Montreal Island).
Cartier entered what he called a 'Great Bay' - the Gulf of St. Lawrence, the mouth of the river - and landed on the coats of Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick and the Gaspé peninula of Quebec. At a place he named Chaleur Bay, which means "bay
~The kids book of canadian exploration.
~Explorers and pathfinders.
~Samuel de Champlain.
~The travels of Samuel de Champlain.
~Jacques Cartier, Samuel de Champlain & the explorers of Canada.
Websites:
~Wikipedia
~Canadian History
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Champlain was worse because he shot three Iroquois with a musket but Cartier shot two times for the enemies to retreat
On April 20, 1534, Cartier set sail under a commission of the king, hoping to discover a western passage to the wealthy markets of Asia. In the words of commission, he was to "discover certain islands and lands where it is said that a great quantity of gold and other riches are to be found." It took him twenty days to sail across the ocean. Starting on May 10 of that year, he explored parts of Newfoundland.
On July 3, 1608, Champlain landed at the "point of Quebec" and set about fortifying the area by the erection of three main wooden buildings, each two stories tall, that he collectively called the "Habitation," with a wooden stockade and a moat 4m wide surrounding them. This was the start of Quebec city. Gardening, exploring, and fortifying this place became great passions of Champlain for the rest of his life.
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