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Aristotle and the Three Rhetorical Appeals

For Mr. Miller's Language Arts Classes
by

Thomas Miller

on 24 August 2016

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Transcript of Aristotle and the Three Rhetorical Appeals

What is Rhetoric?
Rhetoric is the study of the effective use of language
Rhetoric is the art of influencing the thought and conduct of an audience
Who was Aristotle?
AP L&C
Aristotle and the Three Rhetorical Appeals
Think: Imagine talking to a neighbor or
friend. You learn your friend is going
away on vacation, and she has no one to
take care of her dog. You want to convince, or persuade, your friend you're the right person
for the job. What might you say to convince your
friend to allow you to watch her dog? What kind of argument might you make?
384 BC – 322 BC – Greek philosopher, Student of Plato, teacher of Alexander the Great
He wrote on many different subjects, including physics, poetry, theater, music, logic, rhetoric, politics, government, ethics, biology and zoology
Along with Socrates and Plato, he's considered one of the greatest Philosophers of Western thought
Warm-Up
The Three Rhetorical Appeals
Aristotle came up with three strategies used to effectively persuade, or influence anther's thought
Ethos
Logos
Pathos
From the English word 'Ethics'
The trustworthiness of the speaker
Why do we believe what this person has to say?
Trust that the speaker, perhaps because of their credentials, knows that he or she is talking about

Ethos
Examples of Ethos:

Mr. Phillips, a principal of the school for fifteen years, believes locker checks are an important part of school safety.

Dr. Ross, a NASA engineer who finished first in his class at MIT, states that the chance of an asteroid impacting Earth are extremely low.
Logos
From the English word 'Logic'
Any attempt to appeal to the a person's logic
Can be statistics, facts, numbers, graphs
Examples of Logos
Nearly 29% of workers say they have not saved for retirement at all (2003 Retirement Confidence Survey).
More than half of teen drivers use cell phones while driving (National High School Survey).
The United States of America is now over 14 trillion dollars in debt.
Pathos
From the English word 'Pathetic'
Causing or evoking pity, sympathetic sadness
Any attempt to appeal to the emotions
Any attempt to make the audience feel a certain way
Examples of Pathos
When you refuse to vote, you dishonor the thousands and thousands of Americans who have died in war for our freedom.
By using dolphins in the military, many of the animals are put into unsafe situations where many die.
PA Standard Aligned System:
1.1.10.A: Apply appropriate strategies to analyze, interpret, and evaluate author’s technique(s) in terms of both substance and style as related to supporting the intended purpose using grade level text.
1.4.10.C: Write persuasive pieces:
The student will use specific rhetorical devices to support assertions, such as appealing to logic through reasoning; appealing to emotion or ethical belief; or relating a personal anecdote, case study, or analogy.
Clarify and defend positions with precise and relevant evidence.
Full transcript