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Sentences, Run-Ons, and Fragments

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by

Cari Borresen

on 22 October 2014

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Transcript of Sentences, Run-Ons, and Fragments

Sentences, Fragments, and Run-Ons
The Complete Sentence
A grammatically correct sentence needs three parts:

a subject
a verb
and a complete thought

(This combination can also be called an independent clause. A clause contains a subject and a verb, and if it's complete and can stand alone as a sentence, it is termed "independent.")
Fragments
A fragment is an incomplete sentence. In other words, it could be missing a subject, a verb, and/or a complete thought.

Some fragments start with dependent words.
Example: Because the students work hard.

The fragment above is called a "dependent clause." It has a subject and a verb, but it can't stand alone as a complete sentence.
Run-ons
A run-on sentence contains two independent clauses joined together without adequate punctuation.

There are two types of run-on sentences:
fused sentences
comma splices
Common Dependent Words
since
although
if
while
because
when
whenever
where
wherever
before
after
A fused sentence has no punctuation between the independent clauses.

Example: The young swimmer won the competition he was awarded a trophy.
A comma splice has only a comma between the independent clauses.

Example: The young swimmer won the competition, he was awarded a trophy.
5 Ways to Correct Run-ons:
Use a period and a capital letter
Use a semi-colon (;)
Use a semi-colon, transitional word, and a comma
Use a comma and a coordinating conjunction (These are also called FANBOYS: for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so)
Use a dependent word.
Grammatically Correct Sentences
The young swimmer won the competition. He was awarded a trophy.
The young swimmer won the competition; he was awarded a trophy.
The young swimmer won the competition; therefore, he was awarded a trophy.
The young swimmer won the competition, so he was awarded a trophy.
Because the young swimmer won the competition, he was awarded a trophy.
Definitions
Because the students work hard, they will learn the material.
Correct sentence:
Important note:
Commands may appear to be missing subjects, but the subject is understood to be "you."
Example:
Drive carefully!

(This is a grammatically correct sentence.)
Full transcript