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Figurative Language & Sound Devices in Poetry!

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by

Johanna Mitchell

on 22 January 2013

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Transcript of Figurative Language & Sound Devices in Poetry!

Figurative Language





and Sound Devices! His legs bestrid the ocean:
his reared arm crested the world.

William Shakespeare, Antony and Cleopatra 11. All that glitters is not gold;
Often have you heard that told:

William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice 10. My love is as a fever, longing still
For that which longer nurseth the disease

William Shakespeare, Sonnet 147 9. There be more wasps that buzz about his nose.

William Shakespeare, Henry VIII 7. When to the sessions of sweet silent thought
I summon up remembrance of things past,

William Shakespeare, Sonnet 30 6. O beware, my lord, of jealousy!
It is the green-ey'd monster which doth mock
The meat it feeds on

William Shakespeare, Othello 5. But if the while I think on thee, dear friend,
All losses are restor’d and sorrows end.

William Shakespeare, Sonnet 30 4. The world will wail thee like a makeless wife.
The world will be thy widow , and still weep…

William Shakespeare, Sonnet 9 3. Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines
And often is his gold complexion dimm’d,

William Shakespeare, Sonnet 18 2. The world will wail thee like a makeless wife.
The world will be thy widow , and still weep…

William Shakespeare, Sonnet 9 1. Simile
Metaphor
Hyperbole
Personification
Idiom
Alliteration To prepare, write each of the following terms in one of the boxes.
They can be in any order you like! It’s time for…
4-in-a-row! Once upon a midnight dreary
While I pondered weak and weary
Over many a curious volume of forgotten lore
While I nodded, nearly napping,
Suddenly there came a tapping
As if someone gently rapping, rapping
At my chamber door
Tis a visitor, I muttered,
Only this, and nothing more. Find the Alliteration, Assonance, and Consonance! Underline each in a different color.
1. And the silken sad uncertain rustling of each purple curtain. Alliteration,
Assonance, and Consonance!
1. And the silken sad uncertain rustling of each purple curtain. Find the Alliteration, Assonance, and Consonance! Underline each in a different color. Consonance of the sound “rm” in a children’s rhyme:

Norm, the worm, took the garden by storm.

Consonance of the sound “ec” in “Zealots” by the Fugees:

Rap rejects my tape deck, ejects projectile Consonance In Poe's, "Bells", he uses assonance of the vowel "e:"

Hear the mellow wedding bells

Assonance of the vowel "u" used by Robert Louis Stevenson:

The crumbling thunder of seas Assonance Authors use these types of sound devices to evoke a certain mood. Introducing…
Assonance and Consonance! Alliteration
Onomatopoeia
Repetition
Rhyme Scheme The answers are... Word Bank:

Onomatopoeia
Rhyme Scheme
Alliteration
Repetition Write each sound device in the box next to its definition! Simile
Metaphor
Hyperbole
Personification
Idiom The answers are… Word Bank:

Personification
Simile
Hyperbole
Idiom
Metaphor Write each type of figurative language in the box next to its definition! Figurative Language
and
Sound Devices! Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks.

William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet 8. When you identify the type of figurative language or sound device used, draw a big “X” over that box.

4 in a row wins!  You will now see one example of each type of figurative language. Once upon a midnight dreary
While I pondered weak and weary
Over many a curious volume of forgotten lore
While I nodded, nearly napping,
Suddenly there came a tapping
As if someone gently rapping, rapping
At my chamber door
Tis a visitor, I muttered,
Only this, and nothing more. Alliteration, Assonance, and Consonance! The repetition of vowel sounds within non-rhyming words. The repetition of consonant sounds within words 2.
Onomatopoeia
Repetition
Rhyme Scheme
Assonance
Consonance
Free Space! It's time for Independent Practice! The packet contains 3 poems by Robert Frost - you will analyze at least 2! POEM #1: MILD
Stopping by the Woods on a Snowy Evening POEM #2: HOT
The Road Not Taken POEM #3: SPICY!
Acquainted with the Night
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