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Word Crimes

Explicitly teach students how to investigate multiple clues that can lead to the meaning of words and phrases without the assistance of dictionaries and devices.
by

Alyse Sheppard

on 9 December 2015

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Transcript of Word Crimes

Word Attack Strategies
Word Crimes
by Alyse Sheppard

I can use the following investigative strategies to look for clues to words guilty of being hard to understand:
*Connotative and Denotative Meaning
*Figurative Meaning
*Parts of Speech
*Word Parts
*Cognates
*Polysemus Words
*Context Clues
Connotative and Denotative Meaning
Figurative Meaning
Parts of Speech
8 Parts of Speech
Nouns
Verbs
Adjectives
Pronouns
Conjunctions
Interjections.
Word Parts
Prefix
Base
Suffix


Cognates
Polysemous Words
Think of how these examples can change in their meaning.
Trunk Bat Nurse
Bed Truck Net
March Court Drama
Story Medium Police
Context Clues
Essential Question:
What context clue strategies can I use to determine the meaning of an unknown word?
Noun
person, place, thing, idea
common
proper
possessive
names
any
person, place, thing, or idea
uses a
lowercase
letter
Label with
n
.
ex. "school"
names
one particular
person, place, thing, or idea
uses a
capital
letter
Label with
N
.
ex. "Rugby Middle"
names an owner
uses an apostrophe and an -s
Label with
poss n
or
poss N
.
ex. "school's" or "Rugby Middle's"
Flying bat.
When one word has several meanings, we call it polysemous, which corresponds to the Latin words poly, meaning many, and sem meaning sign.
We can understand these words better when we have context, but even then the words can have different meanings.
Activator:
Brainpop video—as you watch the video write down the strategies used to determine the meaning of an unknown word. Write your notes in the language arts section of your AVN.
http://www.brainpop.com/english/studyandreadingskills/contextclues/
Learning Activity
: Practice an example with your group.
Each group will present:
1.
Red
: Read the sentence out loud.
2.
Blue
: Read your group's explanation of the word.
3.
Orange
: Share what type of context clue was used (synonym, antonym, explanation, or example.)
4.
Purple
: Read the word's denotation and whether it is positive or negative in connotation.
must mean
because
Independent Practice: Complete the "Context Clues" practice handout independently. Each group will be assigned one to present:
1.
Red
: Read the sentence out loud.
2.
Blue
: Read your group's explanation of the word.
3.
Orange
: Share what type of context clue was used (synonym, antonym, explanation, or example.)
4.
Purple
: Read the word's denotation and whether it is positive or negative in connotation.

Summarizer
: Create an example sentence modeling each type of context clue on the back of your "Context Clues" handout. Use the dictionary and thesaurus to help you.

Ex. After the Ebola outbreak, my students figured out I have
nosophobia
because I kept talking about how scared I was of contracting the disease.
Context Clue: Explanation
Essential Question:
What emotions and ideas are associated with some words?
Activator:

Watch
and
listen
to the song about connotation and denotation. Fill in the blanks on your song lyrics handout.
http://www.flocabulary.com/word-choice/
Learning Activity:
Word and Image Sort.
Step 1: Sort images into "positive" and "negative" categories.
For example.
..
Step 2: Practice sorting words that mean the same thing, but have different connotations. Ex. "spy" and "observe"
Summarizer:
In a small group, create a music video for about the information from this lesson.
Include:
-The meaning of connotation and denotation
-Examples of each
-And as many supporting visuals as possible.
-All in a song format
Adjectives
describes or modifies a noun
or pronoun
Proper Adjective
articles
proper noun used as an adjective - American
Label with
Adj.
tells Which one? How many? What kind?
Label with
adj.
identify a noun
a, an, the
Label with
art
Learning Activities:
1. Classify the character trait adjectives as positive or negative.
Look the word up in a dictionary or on your device.
Decide if the adjective is positive or negative.
2. Little Miss Muffet video.

http://archive.org/details/mother_goose_little_miss_muffet
3. Read "Curds and Whey".
Label common nouns, proper nouns and possessive nouns.
Label adjectives.
Label articles.
4. Read the following quote from Mark Twain.


In the craft the section of your Writer's Notebook -
Write a short paragraph describing yourself.
Be generous- extremely generous- with your adjectives. Then give your paragraph to a partner to read. Discuss which adjectives you could get rid of to strengthen your writing.

When you catch an adjective, kill it. No, I don't mean utterly, but kill most of them - then the rest will be valuable. They weaken when they are close together. They give strength when they are wide apart.

- Mark Twain
Verbs
action or linking words in a sentence
“Then suddenly, he was struck by a powerful but simple little truth, and it was this: that English grammar is governed by rules that are almost mathematical in their strictness!”
― Roald Dahl, The Great Automatic Grammatizator And Other Stories
Learning Activities:
1. Students identify action verbs in fortune cookie fortunes. Ex. "The skills you have
gathered
will one day come in handy."
Summarizer
: Create a Wordle including the following about your life:
*3 common, proper, and possessive nouns
*5 adjectives
*5 action verbs
2. Students play "Clean Up Your Grammar" an interactive online game in which students are challenged the clean up the nouns and verbs littering a beach by recycling them in the correct category.

http://teacher.scholastic.com/activities/adventure/grammar1.htm#
Learning Targets:
I can identify different types of figurative language.
I can interpret and explain their meaning.
Activator:
SNL: "We're going to pump you up!"
https://screen.yahoo.com/pumping-hans-franz-arnold-schwarzenegger-000000067.html

Linguistic technique authors use to produce a specific effect or style.

Linguistic technique authors use to produce a specific effect or style.

Allusion
A reference to a famous person, place, event, or work of literature.

An interruption in the action to present events that happened at an earlier time.

Flocabulary: https://www.flocabulary.com/figurative-language/
Socrative:
Quiz 1: 16231322
Quiz 2: 16231675
Foreshadowing or Flashback?
Preposition Review
Open your AVN to the LA section.
Tape your list of prepositions on to the next blank page.
A prepositional phrase begins with a preposition and ends with a noun or pronoun. That noun or pronoun is called the object of the preposition.

ex. to the store with me ("to" is the preposition)
("me" is the object of the preposition)
"The Cathedral of Junk
*As you watch, write down as many nouns as you can that are featured in the video.
*Label them as common, proper, or possessive.

Let's practice!
*Classify your noun as common,
proper, or possessive.
Tape it into the correct column on the board.
Full transcript