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Streetcar Named Desire

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Autumn McDonald

on 24 March 2015

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Transcript of Streetcar Named Desire

Literature of Play:
A Streetcar Named Desire

About the Author:
Tennessee Williams

Background of Play:
A Streetcar Named Desire

Works Cited
"Tennessee Williams." Bio. A&E Television Networks, 2015. Web. 21 Mar. 2015.

"Tennesse Williams Devices." Tennesse Williams. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 Mar. 2015.

"Tennesse Williams: Personal Anecdote Experiences." A Streetcar Named Desire. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Mar. 2015.

Williams, Tennessee. A Streetcar Named Desire. New York: New Directions, 1947. Print.

Zanestein. "A Streetcar Named Desire." Rudy's Theater. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Feb. 2015.

Works Cited
Max as

Stanley

Autumn as

Blanche

Emily as

Stella

Andrea as

Eunice

Josh R. as

Doctor/Matron, Mitch/Pablo, and Steve
Class Production
A Streetcar Named
Desire

Setting
Plot Summary
Stella left her plantation home to live in the city with her crude animalistic husband Stanley; but then Stella's older sister, Blanche, shows up out of the blue with bad news: the rest of their family has died and Blanche "lost" the family house, Belle Reve. Stella is forced to accept Blanche into her home. Over the course of the next few months Blanche's story is questioned and secrets are revealed about Blanche's past.
This is the story of a woman stuck in a dream who is thrust back into reality with dire consequences to both her and all that interact with her.
Stanley:
Aggressive, dominant male lead, husband to Stella

Stella:
Submissive, gentle female character, wife to Stanley

Blanche:
Woman lost in a romantic world, learning to face reality, female lead

Eunice:
Stella's friend and neighbor

Mitch:
Poker buddy of Stanley

Pablo:
Poker buddy of Stanley

Steve:
Poker buddy of Stanley

Doctor:
Educated man that helps Blanche calm herself

Matron:
Educated woman working alongside the Doctor
Characters
Themes/Symbols
Themes
Symbols
Conflicts
Social/Psychological Issues
Life Experiences
Literary Accomplishments
Influences on Work
Stylistic Devices
Literary Criticisms
Impact of Playwright
Tennessee Williams
Continued
Scene X and XI
Autumn Hill
Max Butler
Andrea Arellano
Josh Reyes
Emily Brzezinski

Tennessee Williams writes an emotionally driven play with characters devising their actions upon intense sexuality.

Atkinson, Brooks. "First Night at the Theater." The New York Times [New York City] 4 Dec. 1947: 42. Print.
Zanestein. "A Streetcar Named Desire." Rudy's Theater. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Feb. 2015.

The Title
Desire, then Cemeteries, then Elysian Fields. Sex, death, the afterlife.
Blanche takes a streetcar named "Desire" into Kowalski. Literally driven there by her (sexual) desire.
1939
:
Group Theatre Prize
Rockefeller Grant
1945
: (Glass Menagerie)
Sidney Howard Memorial Award
Donaldson Award
New York Drama Critics' Circle Award
1948
: (Streetcar Named Desire)
New York Drama Critics' Circle Award
Donaldson Award
Pulitzer Prize
1952
: (Rose Tattoo)
Tony Award
1955
: (Cat on a Hot Tin Roof)
Pulizter Prize
Tony Award
1961
: (Night of the Iguana)
New York Drama Critics' Circle Award
Tony Award
1980
: Presidential Medal of Freedom
Shmoop Editorial Team."Tennessee Williams Awards."
Shmoop.com.
Shmoop University, Inc. 11 Nov 2008. Web.
Social Issues
Psychological Issues
Sex and Sexual Abuse:
The sexual assult and harm toward women was not a large offence, if any; thus men used their social order to inflict psychological terror upon women.

Mortality:
Death comes in all varieties in this play: the loss of reputation, sanity, physical well-being, relationships, family members, and youth.
Shmoop Editorial Team. "A Streetcar Named Desire Themes." Shmoop.com. Shmoop University, Inc., 11 Nov. 2008. Web. 15 Mar. 2015.
Desire
Fear of being alone
Romaticism vs. Realism
Reality vs. Fantasy
Madness
Silence
The Streetcar
The Blue Piano
Varsouviana Polka Song
Male Role in Society:
Men being viewed as the superior and being morally correct, even if their values are crooked.

Women's Place:
To live under the man of the house's guidelines, and it was not socially acceptable to have their own possesions or personality. They should reflect and live in the shadow of the man.

Social Class:
the order of the hierarchical social class was highly aware.
Streetcar named desire takes place during the 1940’s in New Orleans, LA. Williams describes the area as poor but has a raffish charm.
Williams’s early plays also connected with the new American taste for realism that emerged following the Depression and World War II.
Williams wrote-“because I found life unsatisfactory.”
"Tennesse Williams: Personal Anecdote Experiences." A Streetcar Named Desire. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Mar. 2015.
"Tennessee Williams." Bio. A&E Television Networks, 2015. Web. 21 Mar. 2015.
Much of the pathos found in Williams’s drama was mined from the playwright’s own life...

Alcoholism, depression, thwarted desire, loneliness, and insanity were all part of Williams' world. His experience as a known homosexual in an era unfriendly to homosexuality also affected his work. Williams’ early adult years were occupied with attending college at three different universities, a brief stint working at his father’s shoe company, and a move to New Orleans, which began a lifelong love of the city and set the locale for A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE.
"Tennessee Williams." Bio. A&E Television Networks, 2015. Web. 21 Mar. 2015.
"...the language of the characters in a play is the most important way of defining their nature..."
~Williams
Language of characters
Imagery (visual and auditory)
Symbolism
"Tennesse Williams Devices." Tennesse Williams. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 Mar. 2015.
Alcoholism
Depression
Desire
Loneliness
Insanity
Homosexual Experiences
Blanche vs Stanley
~Class Order ~Desire
Blanche vs Blanche
~Place in Socitey ~Desire ~Fear of being alone ~Romance ~Madness
Stella vs Stanley
~Female Role ~Desire
Stella vs Stella
~Place in Socitey ~Relationships ~Silence
Eunice vs Stanley
~Relationships ~Silence
Shmoop Editorial Team. "A Streetcar Named Desire Title." Shmoop.com. Shmoop University, Inc., 11 Nov. 2008. Web. 15 Mar. 2015.
Williams, Tennessee. A Streetcar Named Desire. New York: New Directions, 1947. Print.
Williams, Tennessee. A Streetcar Named Desire. New York: New Directions, 1947. Print.
Williams, Tennessee. A Streetcar Named Desire. New York: New Directions, 1947. Print.
Williams, Tennessee. A Streetcar Named Desire. New York: New Directions, 1947. Print.
Shmoop Editorial Team. "A Streetcar Named Desire Themes." Shmoop.com. Shmoop University, Inc., 11 Nov. 2008. Web. 15 Mar. 2015.
Williams, Tennessee. A Streetcar Named Desire. New York: New Directions, 1947. Print.
Atkinson, Brooks. "First Night at the Theater." The New York Times [New York City] 4 Dec. 1947: 42. Print.

"A Streetcar Named Desire Critical Commentary." A Streetcar Named Desire. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Mar. 2015.

Shmoop Editorial Team."Tennessee Williams Awards."
Shmoop.com.
Shmoop University, Inc. 11 Nov 2008. Web.

Shmoop Editorial Team. "A Streetcar Named Desire Themes." Shmoop.com. Shmoop University, Inc., 11 Nov. 2008. Web. 15 Mar. 2015.

Shmoop Editorial Team. "A Streetcar Named Desire Title." Shmoop.com. Shmoop University, Inc., 11 Nov. 2008. Web. 15 Mar. 2015.

Shmoop Editorial Team."Tennessee Williams Major Works."
Shmoop.com.
Shmoop University, Inc. 11 Nov 2008. Web.

The importance of A Streetcar Named Desire lies in its effect upon an audience
Intensifying the dramatic interest in the play caused confusion
"A Streetcar Named Desire L Critical Commentary." A Streetcar Named Desire. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Mar. 2015.
Life of Works
1937:
Cairo, Shanghai, Bombay
Candles to the Sun
The Fugitive Kind
1940:
Battle of Angels
1944:
The Glass Menagerie
1947:
A Streetcar Named Desire
1948:
Summer and Smoke
1951:
The Rose Tattoo
1953:
Camino Reel
1955:
Cat on a Hot Tin Roof
1956:
Baby Doll (screenplay)
1957:
Orpheus Descending
1959
: Sweet Bird of Youth
1960:
Period of Adjustment
1961:
The Night of the Iguana
1963:
The Milk Train Doesn't Stop Here Anymore
1968:
The Seven Descents of Myrtle
1973:
Out Cry
1976:
The Eccentricities of a Nightgale
1977:
Vieux Carre
1980:
Clothes for a Summer Hotel
Shmoop Editorial Team. "Tennessee Williams Major Works."
Shmoop.com.
Shmoop University
Inc., 11 Nov 2008. Web.
"For he has not forgotten that human beings are the basic subject of art. Out of poetic imagination and ordinary compassion he has spun a poignant and luminous story.”
~Brooks Atkinson
(New York Times)
Williams took the average way of composing a play and added tender emotion, sexual drama, and human art to create a masterpiece that forever altered not only theater/Broadway; but media: film, television, independent performances, and many forms of production.
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