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Eric Cartman - Social-Cognitive Sociopath

An exploration of South Park character Eric Cartman's personality, using Albert Bandura and Walter Mischel's Social-Cognitive Theory
by

Noah Pancratz

on 20 December 2012

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Transcript of Eric Cartman - Social-Cognitive Sociopath

Tim Boffeli, Ph.D. -Through self-control, is able to ignore short-term rewards in order to facilitate delayed gratification INTRODUCTION -Debuted August 13, 1997 SOCIAL-COGNITIVE SOCIOPATH ERIC CARTMAN Stan Kyle Eric Kenny -Raunchy presentation -Shameless parody of celebrities and public figures -Pushes TV broadcast standards to their limits A. There is a pervasive pattern of disregard for and violation of the rights of others occurring since age 15 years, as indicated by three (or more) of the following: Antisocial Personality Disorder -Depicts extreme and intolerant views such as racism, sexism, anti-Semitism, religious fanaticism, and xenophobia: No subject is sacred or taboo -Eric Cartman: Bigot -Albert Bandura and Walter Mischel's Social-Cognitive theory of personality -Controversial themes introduced overtly -Adler’s Mistaken Lifestyle and Erikson’s Industry versus Inferiority (1) failure to conform to social norms with respect to lawful behaviors as indicated by repeatedly performing acts that are grounds for arrest A. There is a pervasive pattern of disregard for and violation of the rights of others occurring since age 15 years, as indicated by three (or more) of the following: (2) deceitfulness, as indicated by repeated lying, use of aliases, or conning others for personal profit or pleasure Antisocial Personality Disorder Antisocial Personality Disorder (3) impulsivity or failure to plan ahead Antisocial Personality Disorder A. There is a pervasive pattern of disregard for and violation of the rights of others occurring since age 15 years, as indicated by three (or more) of the following: A. There is a pervasive pattern of disregard for and violation of the rights of others occurring since age 15 years, as indicated by three (or more) of the following: (4) irritability and aggressiveness, as indicated by repeated physical fights or assaults Antisocial Personality Disorder A. There is a pervasive pattern of disregard for and violation of the rights of others occurring since age 15 years, as indicated by three (or more) of the following: (5) reckless disregard for safety of self or others Antisocial Personality Disorder A. There is a pervasive pattern of disregard for and violation of the rights of others occurring since age 15 years, as indicated by three (or more) of the following: (6) consistent irresponsibility, as indicated by repeated failure to sustain consistent work behavior or honor financial obligations Antisocial Personality Disorder A. There is a pervasive pattern of disregard for and violation of the rights of others occurring since age 15 years, as indicated by three (or more) of the following: (7) lack of remorse, as indicated by being indifferent to or rationalizing having hurt, mistreated, or stolen from another Antisocial Personality Disorder A. There is a pervasive pattern of disregard for and violation of the rights of others occurring since age 15 years, as indicated by three (or more) of the following: B. The individual is at least age 18 years.
C. There is evidence of Conduct Disorder with onset before age 15 years.
D. The occurrence of antisocial behavior is not exclusively during the course of Schizophrenia or a Manic Episode. (1) failure to conform to social norms with respect to lawful behaviors as indicated by repeatedly performing acts that are grounds for arrest
(2) deceitfulness, as indicated by repeated lying, use of aliases, or conning others for personal profit or pleasure
(3) impulsivity or failure to plan ahead
(4) irritability and aggressiveness, as indicated by repeated physical fights or assaults
(5) reckless disregard for safety of self or others
(6) consistent irresponsibility, as indicated by repeated failure to sustain consistent work behavior or honor financial obligations
(7) lack of remorse, as indicated by being indifferent to or rationalizing having hurt, mistreated, or stolen from another Antisocial Personality Disorder -Technically, Eric does not fit the diagnostic criteria for Antisocial Personality Disorder solely because of his age, but this requirement should be overlooked on the basis that the characters in South Park do not age normally. -South Park depicts dates as well as real events which indicate the normal progression of time. Antisocial Personality Disorder -Eric celebrated his 8th birthday in the first season, over fifteen years ago 1997 -He has accumulated the behavioral history of a normal 23 year old -He continues to demonstrate behavior consistent with the criteria for Antisocial Personality Disorder. 2012 Reciprocal Determinism Reciprocal Determinism -Internal Cognitive Variables -Variables of his Behavior -Variables of the Situation Cognitive Social Person Variables -Perceives injustice in his town, adopts costumed vigilante persona -All variables are perpetually analyzed, used to influence future behavior -Five internal cognitive variables, interact with situational variables and behavior variables, influence perception and behavior -Encoding Strategies
-Expectancies
-Subjective Values
-Self-Regulatory Systems and plans
-Competencies Cognitive Social Person Variables -Encoding strategies: how Eric sorts, groups, retains, and dismisses stimuli in unique ways Cognitive Social Person Variables -Behavior-outcome expectancy: Eric expects that his actions will produce the predicted result Cognitive Social Person Variables -Stimulus-outcome expectancy: Eric observes a stimulus, knows another is likely to follow -Not this time though Cognitive Social Person Variables -Self-efficacy expectancy: Eric predicts that in a particular situation, he will be able to perform the necessary behavior -Perceived self-efficacy: What Eric is capable of doing in various situations Cognitive Social Person Variables -Subjective values: What Eric determines is worth having or doing Cognitive Social Person Variables -Self-regulatory systems and plans: Eric sets a goal for himself, and makes plans to support his goal -Intrinsic Reinforcement and Punishment: From within the self -Extrinsic Reinforcement and Punishment: From others Cognitive Social Person Variables -Competencies: Eric's knowledge and specific capabilities Observational Learning -By internalizing the behavior and consequences portrayed by these models, and based on his understanding of the rules that govern this behavior, Eric learns to adjust his own performance in expectation of receiving or avoiding modeled consequences. Observational Learning -Leanne presents a friendly persona, but there are cracks beneath the surface -Showers Eric with whatever he wants, provides little to no discipline or structure, in order to keep him happy with her -No self-respect, need for affection -Frequent and risky sexual behavior, makes little effort to conceal from Eric -Sordid sexual history,widely known throughout South Park -Did not know the identity of Eric’s father -Acknowledges a history of prostitution and substance abuse Observational Learning -No father or adult male in his life to model, no positive examples of male behavior to learn from through direct observation -Forced to develop his male identity based on examples from television, movies, and video games; with only shallow, exaggerated masculine stereotypes -Overtly aggressive and misogynist attitude, constant attempts to control people and situations, resorts to violence as a means of conflict resolution -Views diversity, acceptance, philanthropy, less fortunate as undesirable or weak -Intolerant of other cultures, races, Judaism, hippies, the poor, the elderly, those with disabilities -Refuses to accept females as equals, abusive to his mother Observational Learning -Attentional processes highly tuned to highlight and filter specific aspects of perceived experiences, specifically those being reinforced; either directly or vicariously. -Gravitates towards powerful models and opportunistic situations, tends to ignore grounded models, situations he perceives offer no value. -Motivational processes: the perception of value in the consequences of specific behaviors -Remarkable ability to manipulate both people and situations with delayed modeling of previously observed behavior -Mental system for representing self, behavior patterns, and environment, allows adaptability to almost any situation, helps avoid negative consequences Self-Regulated Behavior -Behavior development based on negative and inappropriate models, performance standards for conduct proportionally negative and inappropriate. -Moral principles similarly malformed, eliminating traditional self-sanctioned personal standards, affective states, negative effect of self-contempt -Permissive-indulgent parenting provides no external regulation for behavior, immorality, perpetuates unchecked Self-Regulated Behavior -Self-exonerating mechanisms, uses to rationalize behavior to self or others. -Dehumanization -Attribution of blame Self-Regulated Behavior Dysfunctional Expectancies and Psychotherapy -Behavior is clearly dysfunctional, repeatedly demonstrated dysfunctional expectancies -Unclear if any type of therapy method could effectively repair or help correct this development. -Several attempts to reform behaviors, including therapists, child psychologists, summer camp for overweight children, juvenile hall; none appear to have any long-lasting effect on morals, attitude, or behavior -Introduction of a permanent, positive male role model could help form more realistic expectancies, Social-Cognitive Theory View of Human Nature -If the role model persisted in showing him a high level of care, providing realistic boundaries and limits, highest likelihood for success -Deliberate, unethical decisions impact the town, residents; supports semi-deterministic view of Social-Cognitive Theory -Experiences limits to available choices and ability to exercise those choices -Limits include age, weight, greed, laziness, impatience, intolerance, no constructive outlet to focus energy -No control over some limiting factors, but most are internally imposed -Personal freedom still limited by internal factors, inability to recognize, resolve the conflicts they create Social-Cognitive Theory View of Human Nature -Met many people, including celebrities, aliens, the Devil, Jesus; none have appeared to alter life-path -A chance encounter appears to have played important role in conception. -Leanne had an affair with Denver Broncos player Jack Tenorman, kept secret due to teams success -Life path inadvertently self-altered by arranging murder of Jack and his wife, meant to make Scott Tenorman suffer -Forever alienates only sibling, kills his real father, eliminates two, potentially positive, male influences at the same time Industry vs. Inferiority -Underdeveloped social skills, difficulty cooperating with others, generally lazy, coddling by mother, see little value personal industry -Cleaver, capable when goal-oriented, though pursuits are rarely beneficial to society -Otherwise, at best a social loafer, at worst counterproductive. Mistaken Lifestyle -Not concerned with contributing to, improving society -No industrious identity contributes to sense of inferiority, furthered by ridicule from peers -Manifests a negative identity within as opposed to sense of competence, which friends develop through parental involvement and encouragement -Personal situation only one worth improving, willing to marginalize anyone or anything to realize -Falls into both ruling-dominant, getting-leaning type, considered faulty or mistaken in their failure to consider society -Childhood includes all conditions which support formation of faulty lifestyle -Overweight, leads to feelings of physical inferiority; spoiled, pampered by mother, reinforcing idea that others are responsible for personal satisfaction, gratification -Mother’s lack of discipline a form of neglecting, diminishing self-worth while causing trust issues ERIC CARTMAN SOCIAL-COGNITIVE SOCIOPATH -Represents a worse-case scenario in child development -Theoretical application of the Social-Cognitive Theory of personality -Identified aspects of dysfunctional behavior, addressed causes supporting abnormal development -Antisocial and destructive tendencies rivaled only by capacity for evil -May have personally destroyed any chance for positive family relationship in selfish act of vengeance. References American Psychiatric Association. (2000). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (4th ed., text rev.).
doi:10.1176/appi.books.9780890423349.
Bandura, A. (1999). A social cognitive theory of personality. In L. Pervin & O. John (Ed.), Handbook of personality
(2nd ed., pp. 12-14). New York: Guilford Publications. (Reprinted in D. Cervone & Y.
Shoda [Eds.], The coherence of personality. New York: Guilford Press.)
Bandura, A. (2001). Social cognitive theory: An agentic perspective. Annual Review Of Psychology, 52(1), 1. Retrieved from: Academic Search Premier
Grusec, J. E. (1992). Social learning theory and developmental psychology: The legacies of Robert Sears and Albert
Bandura. Developmental Psychology, 28(5), 776-786. doi:10.1037/0012-1649.28.5.776
Olson, M. H., & Hergenhahn, B. R. (2011). An introduction to theories of personality. (8th ed.).
Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.
Stone, M. (Writer), & , (Producer) (1997-2012). South Park, seasons 1-16. Parker, T. (Executive
Producer), New York, NY: Comedy Central. That's All, Folks! PSYC 381-1 Personality By: Noah Pancratz

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