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Bonsai by Edith Tiempo

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Angelika Lunario

on 25 October 2015

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Transcript of Bonsai by Edith Tiempo

Bonsai
by: Edith Tiempo
Nicole Mae Baylon
Kimchi Mae Buhay
Angelika Lunario
206C
All that I love
I fold over once
And once again
And keep in a box
Or a slit in a hallow post
Or in my shoe.
All that I love?
Why, yes, but for a moment-
And for all time, both.
Something that folds and keeps easy,
Son’s note, or Dad’s one gaudy tie,
A roto picture of a young queen,
Blue Indian shawl, even
A money bill.
It’s utter sublimation,
A feat, this heart’s control
Moment to moment
To scale all love down
To a cupped hand’s size,
Till seashells are broken pieces
From God’s own bright teeth,
And life and love are real
Things you can run and
Breathless hand over
To merest child.
- She was born on 22 April 1919 in Bayombong, Nueva Vizcaya.
- Died on August 21, 2011, Dumaguete, Philippines
- She is a poet, fictionist, teacher and literary critic is one of the finest Filipino writers in English whose works are characterized by a remarkable fusion of style and substance, of craftsmanship and insight.
Her poems are intricate verbal transfigurations of significant experiences as revealed, in two of her much anthologized pieces, "The Little Marmoset" and "Bonsai“  

Tiempo is as morally profound. Her language has been marked as "descriptive but unburdened by scrupulous detailing.“
Tiempo's published works include the novel 
A Blade of Fern (1978)
His Native Coast (1979)
The Alien Corn (1992)
One, Tilting Leaves (1995)
The Builder (2003)
The Jumong (2006)
Tiempo's works
The poetry collections
The Tracks of Babylon and Other Poems (1966)
The Charmer's Box and Other Poems (1993)
Marginal Annotations and Other Poems
Inside Job
In the beginning
The Return
Short stories
Abide, Joshua, and Other Stories (1964)
Honors and Awards
National Artist Award for Literature (1999)
Carlos Palanca Memorial Awards for Literature
Cultural Center of the Philippines (1979, First Prize in Novel)
Gawad Pambansang Alagad ni Balagtas (1988)
She obtained her master of arts degree from the State University of Iowa, USA, in 1949
An international, fellow at the State University of Iowa from 1947 t0 1950
Earned her doctorate degree in english from the University of Denver in Colorado, USA in 1958 under a grant from the United Board for Christian Higher Education in Asia
With her late husband they founded (in 1962) and directed the Silliman National Writers Workshop in Dumaguete City which has produced some of the Philippines best writers
A national artist for literature in 1999
Analysis of Poem
The poem is an example of an objective-correlative in which its ideas are elaborated in an abstract approach.
It made us understand about the greater the person is, the deeper, the harder to control it. When the person cannot fathom what really love is, it oppresses the person. That is the ruinous quality of love that may cause the lives of people to deteriorate.
In the first stanza, Bonsai signifies the protagonists desire to contain love in a petite package. This is supported by lines “keep in a box”, “Or slit in a hollow post”, and “Or in my shoe.” The notion is to divert a large idea into a smaller one like love, this idea is supported by the line “fold and keeps easy” which implies the organization of memories that would not be lost.
The second stanza, on the other hand repeats the first line “All that I love” but in and interrogative manner. The second stanza supports the first, the protagonist states elaborated a sense of satisfaction and security. Even if the second stanza supports the first quatrain the idea is contradictory to the first. In a sense that the first quatrain implies a solid statement then the second quatrain states a sign of doubt. It’s was like a person talks about love but does not have experience of being loved back.
On the third stanza, the protagonist made love intimate and within reach. The theme on the other hand implied by the speaker mentioned that only one object was worth keeping but it can also suggest that even the son’s note itself is meaningless except for what it says which can be retained
We're pretty sure none human being could afford to break down seashells into pieces, only God can do it perhaps. Till seashells are broken pieces From God's own bright teeth, Life on earth temporary and whatever we cling on will all be lost. Significant things that we eagerly attain and the good deeds that we redeem here in earth consider as the most treasured and remarkable belongings that we want to turn over to child because we love them so much. I believe this is what the parents want to happen to their children. And life and love are real Things you can run and Breathless hand over To the merest child
All that I love (Assonance)
I fold over once (Assonance)
And once again
And keep in a box
Or a slit in a hollow post
Or in my shoe.
All that I love?
Why, yes, but for the moment
And for all time, both.
Something that folds and keeps easy,
Son’s note or Dad’s one gaudy tie,
A roto picture of a young queen,
A blue Indian shawl, even
A money bill.

It’s utter sublimation
A feat, this heart’s control
Moment to moment
To scale all love down
To a cupped hand’s size,
Till seashells are broken pieces
From God’s own bright teeth.
And life and love are real
Things you can run and
Breathless hand over
To the merest child.
Full transcript