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The Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller

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by

Lindsay W.

on 5 November 2014

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Transcript of The Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller

In
Death of a Salesman
, Arthur Miller explores the issue of personal identity.

Willy Loman
Willy Loman
Biff Loman

Linda Loman
The Death of a Salesman
by Arthur Miller

Biff Loman
Linda Loman
"I think if he finds himself, then you'll both be happier and not fight anymore" (Miller 15).
"I think he is still lost, Willy. I think he's very lost" (Miller 16).
CONTEXT
Linda to Willy
Addressing Biff
Biff comes home from the farm
Willy doubts in his potential for success
THEME
Biff hasn't found himself, struggles to make money on the farm
Willy believes Biff is too old to find himself
Is Biff lazy or not lazy?
"And be sweet to him tonight, dear. Be loving to him. Because he's only a little boat looking for a harbor" (Miller 76).
CONTEXT
THEME
CONTEXT
THEME
CONTEXT
THEME
Quote 1
THEME
Quote 3
THEME
Tyler Wagner, Lindsay Weliver, and Kelsey Wannarka
CONTEXT
Linda to Biff (on the phone)
After Willy left for dinner with his boys
Told Biff to be positive towards Willy, he was in high spirits
The pipe was gone, Willy removed it himself
THEME
Metaphor - Willy to little boat in a harbor
Finding his place to succeed
New job from Howard?
Linda tries to support Willy, encourages her sons to treat him nicely
Caretaker
Supporter
"Chevrolet, Linda, is the greatest car ever built" (Miller 34).

[2 pages later]

"I’m not going to pay that man! That goddamn Chevrolet, they ought to prohibit the manufacture of that car" (Miller 36).
Mentally Incompetent
Dependent on Others
"And what goes through a man's mind, driving seven hundred miles home without having earned a cent? Why shouldn't he talk to himself? Why? When he has to go to Charley and borrow fifty dollar a week and pretend to me that it's his pay (Miller 57)?
Contradiction
Hesitation
Instability
THEME
Willy doesn't think he is "well liked" enough
Issue with believing in the American Dream
No self-worth, obsessed with materialistic items
Full cooperation in supporting Willy
CONTEXT
To Happy and Biff about Willy
After they hear Willy outside talking to himself
Linda was lecturing her sons for their unjust treatment of their father
He, now, runs strictly on commission
"I saw the things that I love in this world. The work and the food and the time to sit and smoke. And I looked at the pen and I thought, what the hell am I grabbing this for? Why am I trying to become what I don’t want to be . . . when all I want is out there, waiting for me the minute I say I know who I am" (Miller 132).
"How the hell did I ever get the idea I was a salesman there? I even believed myself that I'd been a salesman for him! ... We've been talking in a dream for fifteen years" (Miller 104)
"Bernard is not well-liked, is he?" (Miller 33)
This quote shows how Willy defines
success on the approval and support of
other people. He looks down on those who
are not "well-liked", whether he is or not.
Quote 2
THEME
"Your father came to me the day you were born and asked me what I thought of the name of Howard, may he rest in peace" (Miller 80).
This quote shows how Willy
really values relationships and
family connections.
Athlete
Unsure
Biff to Willy
Arguing
His father's dream
Finding oneself
Having your own dream
Do what you enjoy
Work Cited
Biff to Happy
At the restaurant
Biff is trying to be serious with Happy
Miller, Arthur.
Death of a Salesman.
New York: Penguin Plays, 1977. Print.
Dreams and fantasies
Escape from reality
Stuck in dreams
"Will you let me go, for Christ's sake? Will you take that phony dream and burn it before something happens?" (Miller 133)
Biff crying
Big argument between Biff and Willy
Linda and Happy watching
Dangers of a fantasy
Biff wants to follow his own dream
Willy is living a delusion
Forced expectations
Full transcript