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Striped Pants

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KiBbeum S

on 17 October 2012

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Transcript of Striped Pants

Motifs in
King Lear By Anna Wang, Joy Shim, Ke Wang ADDITIONS LETTERS INFINITY Wheel of Fortune Disguises -hide exterior
-pure/decent motives
-dealing with troubles of being banished from the noble class KENT “razed my likeness” (1.4) EDGAR (2.3) disguises himself as “Poor Tom”
“My face I’ll grime with filth, blanket my loins, elf all my hairs in knots and with presented nakedness outface the winds and persecutions of the sky” “escaped the hunt” “take the basest and poorest shape” (5.3) reveals himself, taking off helmet (mask)
“My name is Edgar, and they father’s son” KING LEAR “unaccommodated man is no more but such a poor bare” (3.4) “Off, off, you lendings!” “dressed with weeds” (4.5) EDMUND/GONERIL/REGAN no attempt to hide exterior (disguise) but hide behind words (cc) image by nuonsolarteam on Flickr 1.2 Edmund's forged letter from Edgar “I hope for my brother’s justification he wrote this
but as an essay or taste of my virtue” 1.4 Goneril sends letter to Regan “What he hath uttered I have writ my sister” “If she sustain him and his hundred knights
When I have showed th’unfitness” 1.5 Lear sends letter to Regan “Acquaint my daughter no further with anything you know
than comes from her demand out of the letter” 3.3 Gloucester reveals location of letter containing information about impending French invasion “I have received a letter this night – ‘tis dangerous to be
spoken – I have locked the letter in my closet.” 3.5 Edmund tells Cornwall about letter Gloucester has received from France “This is the letter which he spoke of
which approves him an intelligent party to the advantages of France” 4.2 Goneril receives letter from Regan “May all the building in my fancy pluck
Upon my hateful life: another way,
The news is not so tart –
I’ll read, and answer” 4.4 Oswald gives Regan letter. Tries to deliver Goneril’s letter to Edmund 4.5 Edgar kills Oswald/ takes/ opens letter from Goneril to Edmund 5.1 Edgar gives Goneril’s love letter to Albany “Before you fight the battle, ope this letter” 5.3 Albany gets Goneril to read her letter “read thine own evil” A I R What is air to you? Life, Ability to live vs. The constraint of living 2)Greek Goddess Fortuna (2.1) “Briefness and Fortune, work!” Edmund speaks to himself about his plans to frame his brother Edgar Body Body (4.6) “The natural fool of fortune” Lear shows signs of insight in a field along with Gloucester and Edgar (4.6) “A most poor man, made tame to fortune’s blows” Edgar converses with Gloucester after Lear runs away (4.7) “Thou art a soul in bliss; but I am bound Upon a wheel of fire, that mine own tears Do scald like molten lead” Lear’s converses with Cordelia in the French camp (5.1) “Fortune love you” Edgar conversing with Albany (5.3) “Myself could else out-frown false fortune’s frown” Cordelia’s lines conversing with Lear after they are captured Edmund conversing with the Captain to kill Lear and Cordelia (5.3) “Sir, you have showed today your valiant strain, And fortune led you well” Albany seemingly praising Edmund (5.3) “Despite thy victor sword and fire-new fortune, Thy valor and thy heart, thou art a traitor” Fortune used in a good sense as Edgar confronts Edmund in a duel (5.3) “But what art thou That hast this fortune on me?” Edmund talking to Edgar after he is defeated (5.3) “The wheel is come full circle; I am here.” Edmund is injured by Edgar and he admits to his crimes (5.3) “If Fortune brag of two she loved and hated, One of them we behold” Kent talking to Lear after finding out Cordelia’s been hanged Tip Life is not compassionate. “Blow, winds, and crack your cheeks. Rage, blow!” (3.2) “…the first time that we smell air/ We wawl and cry...that we are come/To this great stage of fools.” (4.6) “Here is better than the open air.” (3.6) “The tyranny of the open night’s too rough/For nature to endure.” (3.4) “…Such groans of roaring wind…Man’s nature cannot carry/Th’ affliction nor the fear.” (3.2) “Welcome then, thou unsubstantial air that I embrace!/The wretch that thou hast blown unto the worst/Owes nothing to thy blasts.” (4.1) Edgar’s outlook
Air vs. wind
Acknowledging its power, yet refusing to despair Life is not compassionate. The one who accepts life as it is will rise. t THE END. 25 000 50 000 life an element of nature divine command -Innocence of human nature vs. life
-Lear shedding his ignorance (Fortune’s Wheel) EDMUND (5.3)“But what art thou
That hast this fortune on me?” 5.3 “The wheel is come full circle; I am here.” EDGAR 4.6 “A most poor man, made tame to fortune’s blows” 5.3 “Despite thy victor sword
and fire-new fortune, Thy valor
and thy heart, thou art a
traitor” LEAR 4.7 “Thou art a soul in bliss; but I am bound
Upon a wheel of fire, that mine own tears
Do scald like molten lead” KENT 2.2 “Fortune, good night; Smile once more, turn thy wheel.” 5.3 “If Fortune brag of two she loved and hated,
One of them we behold” -Life is involuntary
-Air offers no concrete support -air : wind: life
-nature's indifference to the individual
-imperatives, little authority over life "Open": vulnerability of human nature EDMUND:
Act 1, Scene 2 (this policy...)
Act 3, Scene 5 (how malicious...)
EDGAR:
Act 4, Scene 1"the lowest and most.."
LEAR:
Act 1, Scene 1 "mend your speech.."
Act 4, Scene 6 "the natural fool.." FOOL 2.4 "Fathers that wears rags
Do make their children blind,
But fathers that bear bags
Shall see their children kind.
Fortune, that arrogant whore,
Ne'er turns the key to th' poor"
Full transcript