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present perfect and present perfect continuous tense,

present perfect and present perfect continuous tense, use of present perfect and present perfect continuous tense
by

Maryam Bashir

on 1 May 2013

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Transcript of present perfect and present perfect continuous tense,

Maryam Bashir present perfect and present perfect continuous tense Present Perfect Tense Present perfect simple or continuous Formation
(Affirmative form)
sub+have/has+past participle and rest of sentence present perfect + for, since
- when talking about the length of time(duration), we use the
present perfect with for +period of time
- when talking about a starting point, we use the present perfect with since a point in time.

for + a period of time:

( for six years, for a week, for hours etc)

I have worked here for five years.

since + a point in time

(since this morning, since last week, since yesterday etc)

They have lived here since 1998 we use Present Perfect Tense Present Perfect Continuous Tense

An action that has just stopped or recently stopped.

we use present perfect continuous tense to talk about an action that started in the past and stopped recently. there is usually a result now. we use present perfect continuous tense To emphasize the result of the action, we use the simple form.

_ She has made fifteen phone calls this morning.

_ He has written a very good report. I
You
We
They
or any plural noun He
She
It
or any singular noun have has washed washed the dishes. the dishes.
Formation
(Negative form)
sub+have/hasn't+past participle and rest of sentence Present Perfect Tense He
She
It
or any singular noun I
You
We
They
or any plural noun haven't hasn't washed washed the dishes. the dishes. Formation
(Interrogative form)
have/has+sub+past participle? Present Perfect Tense Have Has I
You
We
They
or any plural noun He
She
It
or any singular noun washed washed the dishes? the dishes? we use Present Perfect Tense when we think about the past and present together, we normally use the present perfect. Past Present for example: The aircraft has landed. (means the aircraft is on land now) we use Present Perfect Tense The present perfect is used when the time period has not finished.

for example,

They have seen three movies this week.

(This week has not finished yet) we use Present Perfect Tense The present perfect is often used when the time is recent.

for example,
Sana has just arrived in party. use of ever and never:
we can use ever and never with present perfect tense.

we use ever in questions.

ever means in your whole life

never means not ever. Formation
(sub+auxiliary verb + auxiliary verb +main verb) Have you ever played cricket? No,never subject auxiliary verb auxiliary verb main verb rest of the sentence + + _ _ ? ? I He It We Has
Have have has has have she they not not been been been been been been waiting talking raining. playing writing doing for one hour. too much. football. a letter? their homework? There are basically two uses for present perfect continuous tense I am tired because i have been running. past present future !!! action result now

You don't understand[now] because you haven't been listening. Why the grass wet[now]?has it been raining? more example: we use present perfect continuous tense An action continuing up to now. We use present perfect continuous tense to talk about an action that started in the past and is continuing now. This is often used with for or since. she has been reading for 2 hours. past present future action started in the past action is continuing now more example _ How long have you been learning English?[you are still learning now.] _ she has been studying since 9 o'clock.[she is still studying now.] _ They have been reading for 2 hours.[they are still reading] Present Perfect Simple or Present Perfect Progressive (Continuous) – Which to use? In general, we use the present perfect simple when the action started in the past and is relevant to the present.

This is the third time he has written to you. (he wrote twice in the past and now he is writing again – in the present.)

If it’s an action that started in the past and that same action is still happening now, use the present perfect progressive.

They have been waiting for you since 10 am.

Some actions can be expressed in either tense, especially those that started in the past and still occur in the present on a habitual basis.

I have lived in this house for 20 years. / I have been living in this house for 20 years. Both sentences are correct. To emphasize the action, we use the continuous form.

_ We've been working really hard for a couple of months. Activity Tom: Have you seen Henry recently?

Sara: No. Have you?

Tom: I _____ him since the summer.(negative +see) Paul: Hello Sara, nice to meet you.

Sara: Nice to meet you too.

Paul: How long have you studied here?

Sara: I ______ here for three years, and you?(study)

Paul: Two years. present perfect present perfect continuous A: Sorry I’m so late. How long__________waiting?(you)

B: That’s OK. I’ve only been waiting for ten minutes.

A: Have you been working at the Post Office long?

B: Yes, I have. I’ve been working here for ten years.

A: Your sister is a fine piano player.

B: Yes, she is. She ____ playing the piano since she was eight years old.
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