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The 19th Amendment: Women's Suffrage

Learning about the reason it was made.
by

Abigail Trejo Medellin

on 30 January 2013

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Transcript of The 19th Amendment: Women's Suffrage

By: Abigail Trejo Medellin The 19th Amendment; Women's Suffrage What is the purpose of this amendment? When was it ratified? North Carolina's News During The Women's Suffrage Creating A Better Country Its purpose was to grant the voting right to women all over the country. Many famous women participated in this movement like Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Alice Paul. In 1880, they held the 1st National Women's Suffrage Association to discuss about women's voting issues. Ratified August 18th, 1920 At first, North Carolina didn't really want the amendment to pass, so citizens decided to take a stand. During that time both anti-suffrage and pro-suffrage groups vigorously made campains to persuade people to take their side. People such as Governor Thomas Walter Bickett and Senator Furnifold Simmons didn't support Women's Suffrage. But later they started to believe it would aid the Democrats in the presidential race in 1920 so they urged for the ratification of the amendment. As this amendment finally passed, it united the country more by having women giving their own opinion in elections. This started to encourage women to run for congress. For example, in 1920 Lilian Exum Clement became the first woman elected to the NC House of Representatives. This amendment provided women to have a voice in nation-wide decisions. Elizabeth Cady Stanton After a very long time of protesting for this amendment to be passed, the women finally were able to convince the country and congress that we all deserve equal rights. 3 Groups that wanted this amendment to be passed was: The National Women's Suffrage Association
North Carolina League of Women Voters
American Woman Suffrage Association 2 Groups Who Opposed Was: The National Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage
National Anti-Suffrage Associaton Recent Events: Bev Purdue is elected North Carolina's first female Governor in 2000.
August 18th, 2012 was the 19th Amendment's 92nd Anniversary. Issues That Were Created After Ratification The NWSA & AWSA made a new argument concerning women's superior characteristics, like purity, local issues, concerns with children, etc., that made their votes fundamental to promoting the reforms of the progressive era. Financial Status Both opposing and supporting groups spent large amounts of money for campaigning and conventions trying to convince the population to take their side. The Main Women's Suffrage Activist Alice Paul Susan B. Anthony Citations: •"Feminists March on 50th Anniversary of 19th Amendment." The History Channel. Web. 15 Jan. 2013. <39 http://www.history.com/speeches/us-feminists-march-on-50th-anniversary-of-19th-amendment-adoption • “Suffrage and the Women Behind It.” 2013. The History Channel website. Jan 15 2013, 11:40 http://www.history.com/photos/suffrage-and-the-women-behind-it. •Gustafson, Melanie S."Woman suffrage." World Book Student. World Book, 2013. Web. 14 Jan. 2013. •Nineteenth Amendment." Encyclopædia Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica Online School Edition.
Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., 2013.Web.14 Jan.2013.
<http://www.school.eb.com/eb/article-9488730>. •"feminism." Compton's by Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica Online School Edition.
Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., 2013. Web.15 Jan.2013.
<http://www.school.eb.com/comptons/article-285371>. • National Woman Suffrage Association." Encyclopædia Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica Online School Edition.
Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.,2013. Web.15 Jan.2013.<http://www.school.eb.com/eb/article-9125026>. Citations: •Sochen, June. "Anthony, Susan Brownell." World Book Student. World Book, 2013. Web. 15 Jan. 2013. •Weiner, Rachel. "19th Amendment Anniversary; Politicians Celebrate." The Washington Post. 18 Aug. 2010. Web. 15 Jan. 2013. <.>. •Mount , Steve. "Us Constitution; 19th Amendment." 27 Feb. 2011. Web. 15 Jan. 2013. <.>. •"North Carolina's Women's History Time Line." North Carolina Museum of History. 1 Jan. Web. 16 Jan. 2013. <; http://ncmuseumofhistory.org/nchh/womenshist.html>. • Hamburg, Daniel. "Women's Suffrage in the 20th Century." Youtube. 6 Oct. 2011. Web. 16 Jan. 2013. <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uWQKYmg_0R0>. Google Images
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