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An Introduction to Critical Thinking

Understanding basic formulas for rational thought.
by

Dan Lineaweaver

on 20 September 2012

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Transcript of An Introduction to Critical Thinking

Relevance Critical Thinking Critical Thinking is the ability to think clearly and rationally. It includes the ability to engage in reflective and independent thinking. Someone with critical thinking skills is able to do the following... understand the logical connections between ideas The Seven (7)
Key Factors 1. Clarity 2. Precision 3. Accuracy 4. Relevance 5. Depth 6. Breadth 7. Significance Accuracy [ac-cu-ra-cy] the condition or quality of being true, correct, or exact; An Introduction O identify, construct and evaluate arguments detect inconsistencies and common mistakes in reasoning solve problems systematically identify the relevance and importance of ideas reflect on the justification of one's own beliefs and values freedom from error or defect; correctness Precision [pre·ci·sion] the degree of refinement with which an operation is performed or a measurement stated [rel·e·vance] pertinence to the matter at hand Depth [depth] intellectual complexity or penetration; the degree of richness or intensity Breadth [breadth] Wide range or scope; tolerance; broadmindedness Significance [sig·nif·i·cance] the quality of being worthy of attention; importance; the meaning to be found in
words or events O Video Resources Critical thinking is a requirement for leadership Critical thinking internationally in education Critical thinking and desicion making in business Importance of
Critical Thinking Learning about critical thinking is like opening the doors of your mind... Learning about critical thinking is like opening the doors of your mind... Clarity [clar-i-ty] clearness or lucidity as to perception or understanding; freedom from indistinctness or ambiguity (Additional, 3rd-party resources inside.) (Additional, 3rd-party resources inside.) Relevance An Introduction to Critical Thinking An Introduction to Critical Thinking Understanding basic formulas for rational thought. ...and why it's important. ...and why it's important. Understanding what it is... Understanding what it is... Critical Thinking "Critical Thinking is the ability to think clearly and rationally." Illustration Elaboration "Can you tell me more?" Elaboration is often required for clarity. Do not assume that all of the pertinent information has been communicated initially. Illustrate a point with a picture, metaphor, or analogy. Offer, and ask for, examples and additional supporting evidence. "Can you draw a picture or provide examples?" Context-Driven The level of detail and exactness needed is dependent upon the content being discussed or theorized. "How much detail is needed and relevant?" Context is very important to clarity, which is required to be affective when communicating.

For example, if you are concerned because someone feels too hot to the touch, and you fear they may be ill (leading you to the decision to check their body temperature) it is common knowledge that you would want to measure the results in approximate 10ths of a degree.

This would give you the most useful information to make decisions regarding the subject. Measuring to the thousands of a degree would be more precise, but unnecessary and difficult – overkill, in other words – and only measuring to within approximately 10° would be dangerously approximate, and not helpful. However, if you were to measure the amount of lead in drinking water, you would want it in parts per million, etc. Corroboration Truth is not always self-evident. Seek corroborating evidence, and verify facts. "Does any other credible supporting data exist?" "Does the answer match the question?" "Does the information being presented make enough of an impact on the question at hand for serious consideration?" "Does the information being presented make enough of an impact on the question at hand for serious consideration?" Additional
Resources Additional
Resources Front Front
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