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Dr. Seuss Presentation

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Gavin Clarke

on 22 September 2013

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Transcript of Dr. Seuss Presentation


-The German books in the libraries in Springfield were removed and german descendants such as Seuss were regarded with much prejudice. To prove his hatred for Hitler Seuss published political cartoons about the Nazis.

-Seuss’s great hatred of the Nazi’s provided a new wave of drawings and books in his life.

- Dr. Seuss died on September 24, 1991 College Days Adult Life -As the author’s writing progressed, he developed a unique style only Seuss used which made his books interesting and funny.

-Seuss used a funny, creative form of writing in his books. They usually rhymed and had a variety of made up words to make them rhyme. For example: “You can get all hung up, in a prickly perch".

-Seuss used a wacky style of drawing with exotic animals and impossible landscapes. Seuss’s books also had deeper meanings and lessons such as The Sneetches.

-More than 600 milion Seuss books have been sold in 30 languages and sold in 95 countries. What makes Seuss, Seuss By:Gavin Clarke
Cooper Hayes
and Ward Morrison Dr. Seuss Early Life -Born on March 2, 1904

-Practiced sketching at the zoo where his father was superintendent

-As he went through school Ted was always interested in art and couldn’t keep himself from doodling

-Seuss’s sketches would later develop into the crazy creatures from his children’s books

-Ted Contributed one-liners and cartoons for the Central High weekly

-Seuss’s fake names for his school paper would later turn into his known name: Dr. Seuss. Seuss’s childish doodles and comics "I am the Lorax. I speak for the trees" The Sneetches -During his college days, Seuss’s distinct drawing style would spread and his writing ideas would explode in his English class papers

-Throughout his college years, Seuss would create tons of doodles in his notes that would inspire books later on, “The pages of his notebooks from his Oxford years are penciled in the margins

-He wrote short stories regularly and looked forward to English class

-During college, Ted’s drawings and stories were given much praise and eventually his comics got him a job for the school paper, The Jacko

-Seuss graduated college in 1925 Dr. Seuss Ward Gavin People Who Should Take this into Consideration Sponge Bob and Patrick Mr. Thornton Cooper Works Cited 1. Crichton, Jennifer. "Dr. Seuss Turns 80." Publishers Weekly 225.6 (10 Feb. 1984): 22-23. Rpt. in Children's Literature Review. Detroit: Gale. Literature Resource Center. Web. 5 Apr. 2013.


2. Dean, Tanya. “Who Wrote That? Theodore Geisel (Dr. Seuss). Pennsylvania: Chelsea House Publishers, 2002.


3. “Does High Fashion Really Matter to Consumers?" Talk of the Nation 13 Feb. 2007. Literature Resource Center. Web. 5 Apr. 2013.


4. "Dr. Seuss." Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6Th Edition (2013): 1. MAS Ultra - School Edition. Web. 4 Apr. 2013.


5. "Geisel, Theodor." UXL Encyclopedia of World Biography. Ed. Laura B. Tyle. Vol. 5. Detroit: UXL, 2003. 781-784.Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 5 Apr. 2013.


6. John Bowman, Editor. "Theodor Seuss Geisel (Dr. Seuss, Theo. Lesieg, Rosetta Stone, Pen Names) (1904-91)."Cambridge Dictionary Of American Biography (2001): 1. MAS Ultra - School Edition. Web. 5 Apr. 2013.


7. Justin, Moyer. "What's the big idea?." Washington Post, The 3: Newspaper Source. Web. 4 Apr. 2013


8. Roback, Diane. "Hats Off To Seuss." Publishers Weekly 260.8 (2013): 11. MAS Ultra - School Edition. Web. 5 Apr. 2013.


9. "Seuss, Dr." Gale Contextual Encyclopedia of American Literature. Vol. 4. Detroit: Gale, 2009. 1449-1452. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 4 Apr. 2013.



10. “The Cat in the Hat.” drawing. “Seuss, Dr.” The Cat in the Hat. New York. Random House. 1957. Title Pg. Print.


11. "The Cat’s Place in History." Dr. Seuss. Ruth K. MacDonald. Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1988. 163-170. Twayne's English Authors Series 544. Twayne's Authors on GVRL. Web. 5 Apr. 2013.


12. "Theodor Geisel (Dr. Seuss)." Encyclopedia of World Biography. 2nd ed. Vol. 6. Detroit: Gale, 2004. 255-256. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 5 Apr. 2013.


13. "Top 25 children's picture books." Publishers Weekly 11 Mar. 2013: 16. Literature Resource Center. Web. 4 Apr. 2013


14. Von Bergen, Julie. "Theodor Geisel, Dr. Seuss." Theodor Geisel, Dr. Seuss (2005): 1. MAS Ultra - School Edition. Web. 5 Apr. 2013.


15. Website on Theodore Seuss Geisel's Life and Works." Gale Online Encyclopedia. Detroit: Gale, 2013. Literature Resource Center. Web. 5 Apr. 2013.


16. Woodhouse, Mark. "Dr. Seuss: The Cat Behind The Hat." Library Journal 138.1 (2013): 91. MAS Ultra - School Edition. Web. 5 Apr. 2013.



17. Zawacki, Andrew. "Geisel, Theodor Seuss (1904–1991)." American Writers: A Collection of Literary Biographies, Supplement 16. Ed. Jay Parini. Detroit: Charles Scribner's Sons, 2007. 97-115. Scribner Writers on GVRL. Web. 5 Apr. 2013.

Topic sentence: Dr. Seuss’s childhood was a major source of influences and ideas for his later life where schoolbook doodles and wacky stories would turn into some of the most world renowned children’s books ever written.

A. “His mother was supportive of Ted’s creative impulses, and encouraged him do what interested him.”

(This quote was taken from the biography of Seuss. It shows how close of a bond he had with his mother.)

B. When his art teacher berated Ted for drawing pictures upside down, he transferred out of art class. In his senior year he wrote and staged a minstrel show, also serving as “grind and joke editor” for the yearbook, Pnalka. He was voted class artist and class wit



(Zawacki, Andrew, Even though he got kicked out of his art class, he still won “best artist” and “best wit” which would contribute to his books and comics later.)



C. Ted Contributed one-liners and cartoons for the Central High weekly, the Recorder, under the name “Pete the Pessimist” (Morgan 23). He authored satires as well, one of which he signed “T. S. LeSieg,” a backward spelling of his name that he would later employ.



(Zawacki, Andrew, This shows how his artist career was slowly coming together even in his high school years.)



D. When he was a child, Geisel practiced sketching at the local zoo, where his father was superintendent.



( Encyclopedia of World Biography. It shows that even from the start, he was always interested in drawing, especially animals.)



Wrap up sentence: Seuss’s childish doodles and words would continue to develop even after his childhood years up into college and beyond.




II. College years

Topic Sentence: As Dr. Seuss went through college he gained more experience in his writing, he also decided to start writing for kids ,during this time he made some outstanding children's literature.

A. The pages of his loose leaf notebooks from his Oxford years, however, showcase a penciled menagerie in the margins: cows and Cupids, dogs and devils, chickens and chic women



(Zawacki, Andrew. Shows his love of drawing.)



B. By the next year Ted drew regularly for Jacko and joined the art staff; he also sampled a creative writing class devoted to marketable articles, in which he wrote a book review of the Boston & Maine Railroad timetable (Morgan 32). When MacLean became Jacko editor, the two often wrote its entire contents, occasionally alternating lines. In 1924, having been elected editor in chief, Ted warned his staff“not to think like Babbitts,” invoking the novelist Sinclair Lewis’s protagonist as a symbol of all that Ted found facile and conformist (Morgan 35). When Ted was busted in April 1925 for drinking a pint of bootleg gin, he was forbidden to continue as editor—but he persisted, seeking anonymity for the final issues in pseudonyms, including “Seuss.”



(Zawacki, Andrew. Shows his enthusiasm of working in collaborative efforts.)



C. “In college, he was often discriminated against because people mistakenly thought he was Jewish. He started writing for the school paper, the “Jack-O-Lantern,” better known as “Jacko.”



( Book , Who Wrote that? Dr. Seuss. Shows that he wanted to write things, also tells of his religion.)



D. The freshman proceeded to work on the college humor magazine, Jack-O-Lantern

(Zawacki, Andrew. Again shows his interest in collaborative efforts.)

E. By the next year Ted drew regularly for Jacko and joined the art staff; he also sampled a creative writing class devoted to marketable articles, in which he wrote a book review of the Boston & Maine Railroad timetable (Morgan 32). When MacLean became Jacko editor, the two often wrote its entire contents, occasionally alternating lines. In 1924, having been elected editor in chief, Ted warned his staff“not to think like Babbitts,” invoking the novelist Sinclair Lewis’s protagonist as a symbol of all that Ted found facile and conformist (Morgan 35). When Ted was busted in April 1925 for drinking a pint of bootleg gin, he was forbidden to continue as editor—but he persisted, seeking anonymity for the final issues in pseudonyms, including “Seuss.” (Zawacki, Andrew)



Wrap Up Sentence: As Dr. Seuss wrapped up his college days he was ready to take his first steps into his adult life, where he would make great literature.



III. Adulthood

Topic Sentence: Dr. Seuss, although known as an amazing writer of literature today, had to go through many different jobs and challenges before he settled on being an author.

A. “Viking Press offered Ted a contract to illustrate a book called “Boners” (1931), a collection of funny children’s sayings.”





B. “Ted was pleased to find that many new improvements had come along to make book printing even more visually appealing. These new printing methods allowed many more colors to be used on the page. Nothing could’ve made Seuss happier.”



C. “Ted expected to be immersed in the film process and have control over “his” project. Helen, however, was concerned that this would be one of the busiest years of their lives- and a year without a new book. She knew that this was one of Ted’s greatest dreams, and she was willing to sacrifice whatever was needed to make him happy.”



D. The title story of The Sneetches appropriates the Holocaust more explicitly, while inverting its basic terms: the Star-Belly Sneetches consider themselves superior to the Plain-Belly Sneetches. A series of swaps ensues when the Plain-Belly Sneetches find a machine to assign them their own stars; once the Plain-Belly Sneetches are starred, the original Star-Belly Sneetches decide to efface their symbols with aStar-Off Machine. The on-again, off-again stellar volley illustrates the arbitrary nature of insignias and the insane logic of ideologies that deploy them. While the book satirizes theories of exclusivity, it also warns against the capitalist knack for creating demand. The mercenary Sylvester McMonkey McBean peddles his star-making and star-erasing machines to both clans of Sneetches before finally driving off with all the money. It takes mutual bankruptcy to force the victims of his commercialism to embrace one another under the motto, “Sneetches are Sneetches.” (Zawacki, Andrew)



E. By 1941 Geisel was fed up with Adolf Hitler and Benito Mussolini. He and Helen, visiting Italy, had heard radio speeches by the Italian leader as early as 1926. Ten years later Geisel’s mood had been heavy returning from Europe, the nascent stages of Mulberry Street not engrossing enough to obviate his dread regarding Germany’s new dictator (Morgan 54, 80). In the off hours, in the wake of the German march on Paris Geisel started sketching politically charged cartoons. He showed one to his friend Zinny Vanderlip Schoales, who had joined Ralph Ingersoll on the tabloid PM, and it ran on January 30, 1941 (Morgan 100). A slap at Virginio Gayda, editor of the fascist propaganda organ Il Giornale d’Italia and Seuss’s “second choice” for “the world’s most outstanding writer of fantasy”—Seuss reserved the pole position for himself—the cartoon was the first of more than four hundred he contributed to the magazine over two years (Minear, Dr. Seuss Goes to War 10–11). (Zawacki, Andrew)



Wrap Up Sentence: During his adult life Dr. Seuss made a ton of great children's literature books he even got several awards, but Dr. Seuss was far from being done with writing!



IV. What makes work “Seuss”

Topic sentence: As the young author’s writing progressed, he developed a unique style only Seuss used which made his books interesting and funny.

A. The title story of The Sneetches appropriates the Holocaust more explicitly, while inverting its basic terms: the Star-Belly Sneetches consider themselves superior to the Plain-Belly Sneetches. A series of swaps ensues when the Plain-Belly Sneetches find a machine to assign them their own stars; once the Plain-Belly Sneetches are starred, the original Star-Belly Sneetches decide to efface their symbols with aStar-Off Machine. The on-again, off-again stellar volley illustrates the arbitrary nature of insignias and the insane logic of ideologies that deploy them. While the book satirizes theories of exclusivity, it also warns against the capitalist knack for creating demand. The mercenary Sylvester McMonkey McBean peddles his star-making and star-erasing machines to both clans of Sneetches before finally driving off with all the money. It takes mutual bankruptcy to force the victims of his commercialism to embrace one another under the motto, “Sneetches are Sneetches.” (Zawacki, Andrew)



B. “I know I have 19 of the 25 top children books of all time, but I know that it is for the kids, not for me”

(During an interview Dr. Seuss spoke these words about him having 19 of the top 25 children books of all time)




C. While he was talking to a reporter on his 80th birthday he spoke these words about his books. “I have the reputation for being the worst didactic author since Elsie Dinsmore—does anybody remember Elsie Dinsmore?—but it isn't necessarily so,” protests Geisel. “I've done 44 books, and only six were message-oriented. So it's only a ratio of six to 36. That's not so bad, hmmm?"

(This quotation was taken from an interview on Dr. Seuss’s 80th birthday)



D. “Dr. Seuss, aka Theodor Seuss Geisel, died in 1991 at the age of 87; more than 600 million Seuss books have been sold in 30 languages and 95 countries. According to Random House, Seuss sales at the register are up 50% so far this year, after a record 2012 in which register sales were up 40% from the prior year.”



E. “I like nonsense, it wakes up the brain cells. Fantasy is a necessary ingredient in living, it's a way of looking at life through the wrong end of a telescope. Which is what I do, and that enables you to laugh at life's realities.”

F. “You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself in any direction you choose. You're on your own, and you know what you know. And you are the guy who'll decide where to go.”




G. “Today you are you! That is truer than true! There is no one alive who is youer than you!”



Wrap Up Sentence: Dr. Seuss had a very long and prosperous life full of literature, books, and joy, and because of this Dr. Seuss was one of the greatest children's literature book writers of all time.

One of Seuss's sketches Gavin Cooper Ward Thanks for Listening to our Presentation, I hope you enjoyed!!! With Special Guest Star, Dr. Seuss Dr. Seuss
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