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The Eight Parts of Speech

You might be asking yourself, "What are the Eight Parts of Speech?" Look no farther for the answer! This Prezi outlines the Eight Parts of Speech so ANYONE can understand it!!!
by

Dakotah Johnson

on 19 March 2013

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Transcript of The Eight Parts of Speech

By: Dakotah Johnson and Henry Thurber The Eight Parts of Speech Adjectives Adjectives are words that describe or modify nouns and/or pronouns. Ex. great, pink, purple, red. Adverbs Adverbs describe how verbs or adjectives are done. They usually end in ly. Ex. Swiftly, Quickly. Nouns! PRONOUNS!! Nouns A noun is a person, place, thing or idea. Things like cat, house, and book are known as common nouns. Proper Nouns Proper nouns are nouns that are specific. Yankee Stadium is a proper noun because it is a certain type of stadium. First Person Pronouns Second Person Pronouns Third Person Pronouns First person means that something is in the point of view of the person speaking.
Singular: I called.
Plural: We called. Abstract nouns name things that you can think about but you cannot see or touch. December is an abstract noun. You can think about it, but you can't see or touch it. Finally, there are collective nouns. Collective nouns name a collection of people, animals, or things. Class and school are collective nouns. Class is a collection of humans while a school is a collection of fish. All of this is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the eight parts of speech. Second person means that something is in the view of the person being spoken to.
Singular: You called.
Plural: They called. Third person means that something is in the view of the person being spoken about.
Singular: He/She/It called.
Plural: They called. Concrete Nouns Concrete nouns name things you can see and can be touched. Water is a concrete noun because you can touch it. Abstract Nouns Abstract nouns name things that you can think about but you cannot see or touch. December is an abstract noun. You can think about it, but you can't see or touch it. Collective nouns name a collection of people, animals, or things. Class and school are collective nouns. Class is a collection of humans while a school is a collection of fish. All of this is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the eight parts of speech. Collective Nouns A pronoun is a word used in place of a noun. The noun replaced, or referred to, by the pronoun is called the pronoun's antecedent. The swim team practiced hard, so it won the swim meet. In this sentence, the swim team is the pronoun's antecedent and "it" is the pronoun. There are two types of pronouns. They are personal and indefinite pronouns. The three types of personal pronouns are first person, second person, and third person. Indefinite Pronouns Indefinite pronouns refer to something that is not named or known. Here are some examples. Verbs A verb is often defined as a word which shows action or state of being. The verb is the heart of a sentence. Every sentence must have a verb. Linking Verbs Personal Pronouns No, not THAT type of Link! REAL Linking Verbs A linking verb links a subject to a noun or an adjective in the predicate. There are two common types of linking verbs. They are forms of "be" and other linking verbs.
Forms of "Be": Be, is , are, was, were, am, been, and being
Other Common Linking Verbs: Appear, become, feel, grow, look, remain, seem, smell, sound, and taste Helping Verbs http://grammar.yourdictionary.com/parts-of-speech/verbs/Helping-Verbs.html Verbs like might, will, and must are helping verbs. I will kick the soccer ball into the net. I might buy that book. I must run from the bulls. I buy lots of pizza.
I run from people.
I eat tons of food. Adjectives answer 4 questions. What kind, How much, How many, Which one French bread Blue house Many pizzas That diamond Comparative and Superlative Forms These are used to compare TWO things. For most 1 syllable adjectives, add -er to make comparative forms. These are used to compare THREE OR MORE things. To compare three or more things, add -est to make superlative form. Positive Comparative Superlative
large larger largest CONJUNCTIONS! Conjunctions connect words, groups of words, and sentences. There are three types of conjunctions. They are coordinating, subordinating, and correlative. Coordinating Conjunctions Coordinating conjunctions connect words, sentences, and compound subjects and predicates. I like pie and cake. I need to go to school or I will miss my favorite project. All the coaches and current team members attend tryouts. Subordinating Conjunctions Subordinating conjunctions connect dependent clauses to independent clauses. Positive Adverbs Positive Adverbs express the quality of the person, place, thing, or idea without comparing. Ex. I danced gracefully. Interjection http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interjection#Examples_in_English Ex. Ouch, Well, Hey Do you understand? We hope this Prezi helped you understand the BIGGER PICTURE of the Eight Parts of Speech!

THANKS FOR WATCHING!!! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indefinite_pronoun#List_of_English_indefinite_pronouns Irregular Verbs http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/605/01/ Action Verbs http://www.englishlanguageterminology.org/parts-of-speech/action-verbs.htm Interrogative Adjectives Prepositions The interrogative adjectives (which and what) modify nouns (including noun phrases) and are used in questions. Prepositions link nouns, pronouns, and phrases. Examples:

Which car was involved? (modifies "car")
What book are they reading? (modifies "book") Prepositions usually indicate one of three types of relationships. They are spatial, logical, and temporal. The word or phrase the preposition introduces is called the preposition's object. Prepositional Phrases Indefinite Adjectives An indefinite adjective is an adjective formed from an indefinite pronoun. The most common indefinite pronouns are: all, any, anyone, anything, each, everybody, everyone, everything, few, many, nobody, none, one, several, some, somebody, and someone. A prepositional phrase is made up of the preposition, any associated adverbs or adjectives, and the preposition's object. Demonstrative Adjectives A prepositional phrase can act as a noun, adjective, or adverb. On, Beneath, Over, and during are all examples of prepositions. The book is on the table. The highlighted part of this sentence is the prepositional phrase. The demonstrative adjectives are this, that, these, and those. A demonstrative adjective is used to modify a noun to point out or demonstrate a specific item(s). Possessive Adjective Possessive adjectives - my, your, his, her, its, our, your, their - modify the noun following it in order to show possession.

Examples:

I'll get my bag.
Is this your luggage?
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