Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Skills for GCSE Drama

Strategies, Elements, and Mediums
by

Rachel Smith

on 26 August 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Skills for GCSE Drama

Explorative
Strategies
,
Elements
, and
Mediums.

Narrating
Hot Seating
Role Play
Marking
the
Moment

Still Image
Cross Cutting
Action, Plot, Content
Climax/Anti-Climax
Forms
Symbols
Lighting
Set
Props
Sound and Music
Space and Levels
Movement, Mime, and Gesture
Voice, and Spoken Language
Narrating
Why are you Learning?
To develop an understanding of the uses of Narration

To be able to use Narration with confidence

To be able to explain how Narration enhances the Drama
Narrating
Apply the Skill:
Narrator on
the side
Telling the Story
Character reading from a Letter/Diary, could lead onto action or have action in the background
Narration between scenes to move the story along
Character Narrating a moment in their life, with the action happening around them
Having more than one person narrating. This could be numerous characters narrating.
Narrating
Demonstrate the Skill:
Perform back your scenes with Narration
Narrating
Evaluate the Skill:
Why use Narrating?
What can it add to the Drama?
Narrating
HOW are you showing you are Learning?
By taking part in a scene which uses Narration

By applying the skill with confidence

By making confident reflections during the evaluations
HOW will you show you are Learning?
Hot Seating
By taking part in hot seating activities

By creating a thoughtful character

By demonstrating an imaginative and thorough character
WHY will you show you are Learning?
Hot Seating
By taking part in hot seating activities

By creating a thoughtful character

By demonstrating an imaginative and thorough character
Learn the Skill:
Hot Seating
Hot-seating is a technique to deepen the actor’s understanding of a character and the role of that character.
This is a group technique where the actor playing a role sits in the ‘hot seat’ and is questioned by other members of the group.
That actor has to answer the questions in the spirit of the character that he/she is playing.
By using this technique, the actor can begin to deepen his/her understanding of the character.
The character becomes more believable to the actor as he/she discusses issues in the role of the character.
Apply the Skill:
Hot Seating
Task One:
Creating a character
Task Two:
What types of questions would help to explore a character further?
-Hot Seating
Task Three:
Choose an answer from your hot seating which can be developed further. Create a short monologue which explore this.
Demonstrate the Skill:
Hot Seating
Perform back monologues
Evaluate the Skill:
How does using Hot seating help to develop a character?
Role Play
How will you show you are Learning?
By taking part in a role play

By creating a character with thought

By challenging others, creating interesting back stories, performing a believable character
Role Play
Why are you Learning?
To be able to create a character

To be able to create a believable character for an extensive amount of time

To be able to sustain a role, and improvise within that role, any challenges that may arise
Role Play
Learn the Skill:
Role-play is another strategy which allows an actor to deepen his/her understanding of the character.
The actor pretends to be someone else and takes on their role completely.
By putting themselves in the role of a character, the actor imagines exactly what that character thinks, feels, believes, and how they would act in a certain situation.
Role-play is important if you are going to make your audience believe completely that you are the character.
By using your imagination as to what it is like to be that character, you will persuade your audience that you are that character.
Every production you will take part in will involve some sort of role-play.
Role Play
Apply the Skill:
You are a resident of Orton Meadows, a small village in the middle of tranquil countryside views. You each need to have a character within the community-make sure that there is a good selection (i.e. families, OAPs, early twenties etc.)

Tesco have decided to build a superstore in your village. Your local supermarket is approximately 15miles away, and the company director feels that your village and other local villages will benefit from the new superstore.

Some of the residents are FOR the new supermarket and some are AGAINST it.

You have 10minutes to work in your groups to come up with good reasons for or against having the supermarket within your village. You should make interesting back stories for your character, giving good reasons why they would or would not want the supermarket there.
Role Play
Demonstrate the Skill:
The town mayor who has control over the land that TESCO wish to purchase has decided to call a town meeting to get the views of the local residents to help her make her decision.

During this meeting you will be required to stay in character for the whole time. You must speak as your character, making appropriate reactions to the meeting.
Role Play
Evaluate the Skill:
How did the meeting go?

What do you think will happen?

Were you successful in sustaining the character?

What could have been improved?
Marking the Moment
HOW are you showing
that you are Learning?
By creating a performance which includes a marked moment
By making an impact on the audience through the marked moment
By be able to explain the importance of having Marked Moments in Drama
Marking the Moment
Why are you Learning?
To be able to create a performance which includes a marked moment
To be able to make an impact on the audience through marking moments
To be able to explain the importance of having Marked Moments in Drama
Marking the Moment
Learn the Skill:
When you have created a piece of drama, you, your fellow actors and the director may decide that there is a moment in the action that is of particular significance.
It may be that the moment represents a particular significance for that character.
It could also be that that moment sheds light on much of the action that has taken place up until that moment.
Or that moment may evoke certain strong feelings in a character.
To ‘mark that moment’ as a special moment in the play, a particular technique may be used.
The action might be ‘frozen’ at that moment so every one stands completely still on the stage.
A spotlight might be used on one character to highlight them.
Inner thoughts might be spoken out loud.
Marking the Moment
Apply the Skill:
Task One:

Choosing the right moment to be marked.

Using the script- 2 volunteers, given stage positioning, students to perform the scene.

Discussion on where would be a good moment to mark- thinking about this

-The moment Marie knows her fate is death.


Try out different suggestions
Task Two:
In small groups, create your own scene which aims to deliver certain emotion to the audience, through the use of a marked moment
Marking the Moment
Demonstrate the Skill:
Watching back performances
Marking the Moment
Evaluate the Skill:
How did the group use the skill?
Was if effective? Why?
How could it be improved?
Thought Tracking
Narrating
Why are you Learning?
To develop an understanding of the uses of Narration

To be able to use Narration with confidence

To be able to explain how Narration enhances the Drama
Narrating
Apply the Skill:
Narrator on
the side
Telling the Story
Character reading from a Letter/Diary, could lead onto action or have action in the background
Narration between scenes to move the story along
Character Narrating a moment in their life, with the action happening around them
Having more than one person narrating. This could be numerous characters narrating.
Narrating
Demonstrate the Skill:
Perform back your scenes with Narration
Narrating
Evaluate the Skill:
Why use Narrating?
What can it add to the Drama?
Narrating
HOW are you showing you are Learning?
By taking part in a scene which uses Narration

By applying the skill with confidence

By making confident reflections during the evaluations
How will you show you are Learning?
Still Image and Thought Tracking
By creating still images and using thought tracking

By using all 5 key components of a still image, and making appropriate thought tracking

By being able to explain the importance of Still image and thought tracking in performance
Why are you Learning?
Still Image and Thought Tracking
To be able to use still images and using thought tracking in performance

To be able to apply all 5 key components of a still image, and make appropriate thought tracking

To be able to explain the importance of Still image and thought tracking in performance
Learn the Skill:
Still Image
A still image can be thought of just like a photograph.
One person in the group takes responsibility for positioning individuals in the group into a still image so they are positioned as a group in complete stillness.
That one person is acting like a sculptor in forming the image of the scene.
The group as a unit make up an image – so, for example, there may be six people on stage and by stopping the action for a moment, the audience can be allowed to look at the actors’ facial expressions and body language in more detail than usual.
In a panic situation or a situation of high tension, the audience would be able to see the fear or horror on the faces of the actors.
They could also examine the gestures that the actors are in the middle of making.
The image is a group situation but the audience can examine the whole situation in minute detail.
Learn the Skill:
Thought Tracking
Thought-tracking is the process whereby a character is stopped during a role and is asked to reveal their thoughts at that moment.
The character then speaks out loud his/her thoughts.
Other characters do not hear this.
This technique allows the audience to understand the character in more depth.
Knowing someone’s thoughts reveals a great deal about them.
The audience becomes better informed during thought-tracking.
Their understanding of the character is deepened because they are, in a sense, reading the character’s mind.
Apply the Skill:
Still Image and Thought Tracking
Create a still image in response to the following photographs, remember, your image does not have to be a replica of the photograph:
Learn the Skill:
Still Image
Facial
Expression
Proxemics
Levels
Focus
Body
Language
5 Key Components
Now include some thought tracking, which might enlighten the audience to something about your characters, thoughts/feelings on the situation
Apply the Skill:
Still Image and Thought Tracking
Take one still image and develop it further with some action before or after. Remember, a still image must be still for 5 seconds. You must include Thought Tracking
Demonstrate the Skill:
Still Image and Thought Tracking
Perform Scene and Still Images
Evaluate the Skill:
Still Image and Thought Tracking
What was the effect of the still image?
Did they use the 5 key components effectively?
Would you do anything different?
Was the thought tracking effective?
Cross Cutting
HOW will you show you are learning?
By creating a performance which includes one element of Cross Cutting

By creating a performance which confidently attempts to alter the structure

By explaining with confidence how Cross Cutting can be used in performance
Cross Cutting
WHY are you Learning?
To be able to create a performance which includes Cross Cutting

To be able to create a performance which confidently uses Cross Cutting

To be able to explain with confidence how Cross Cutting can be used in performance
Cross Cutting
Learn the Skill:
Cross-cutting allows you to look at a scene from different perspectives.
In other words, you can take a scene or a number of scenes and re-order them so that they take place in a different order to the one that the playwright had anticipated.
You can ‘cut’ backwards and forwards to different moments of the drama.
By using cross-cutting you can explain to the audience why things happened and what the reasons were for characters to act in a particular way.
By moving backwards and forwards through time, you can make the action more poignant for the audience.
A funeral scene, for example, can take place before a scene where the deceased person is still alive, making plans for the future and enjoying himself.
Many drama productions take place in a linear timeline. In other words, time on the stage is like everyday time. It is sequential.
However, this can make drama predictable.
By changing the timeline and taking scenes out of order, the action can be broken up.
In this way, the audience may be aware of the significance of what a character says or does, whereas the character may seem oblivious to it.
Cross Cutting
Apply the Skill:
Discuss:

What performances might be shown out of chronological order?
Options:

Using the story provided, retell the events in a different order

or

Create your own performance which tells events out of chronological order
Cross Cutting
Demonstrate
the Skill:
Perform Scenes
Cross Cutting
Evaluate
the Skill:
What is the purpose of using Cross Cutting?
Were the scene effective?
What could have been done to improve?
Plot, Action, Content- Climax/AntiClimax
HOW will you show you are Learning?
By identifying the plot, action, content, and Climax of performances

By planning a performance that includes plot, action, content, and Climax

By explaining the need for plot, action, content, and Climax within performances.
Plot, Action, Content- Climax/AntiClimax
WHY are you Learning?
To be able to identify the plot, action, content, and Climax, which can then be applied in performance

To be able to successfully plan a performance that includes plot, action, content, and Climax

To be able to explain the need for plot, action, content, and Climax within performances.
Plot, Action, Content- Climax/AntiClimax
Learn the Skill:
The PLOT of the drama is shown in the 'through-line' of the drama - its beginning, middle and end - although it doesn't have to be presented in a linear structure. The characters in a play are also part of the plot.
The ACTION of the drama consists in the events that the characters take part in as they act the play.
The CONTENT of the drama lies in the themes it deals with, eg bullying, the responsibilities of power, the bravery of ordinary people etc.
The use of climax and anti-climax (the building and releasing of tension) in a drama is crucial, as it creates a sense of expectation in the audience. We can become incredibly tense as we wait to see what's going to happen in a play, and then we're relieved when things turn out well. It all adds to an interesting experience.
Plot, Action, Content- Climax/AntiClimax
Learn the Skill:
Watch the following Performances, and identify the
PLOT- ACTION- CONTENT
Plot, Action, Content- Climax/AntiClimax
Apply the Skill:
In groups of 3

Create a plan for a performance which includes

Plot
Action
Content
Climax/Anticlimax
Was there a Climax/AntiClimax?
Plot, Action, Content- Climax/AntiClimax
Demonstrate the Skill:
To be continued...
FORM
HOW will you show you are Learning?
By exploring different Dramatic Forms

By including a particular Dramatic Form in your performances

By explaining in detail how Dramatic Form enhances Drama
FORM
WHY are you Learning?
To be able to perform different Dramatic Forms

To have the confidence to include Dramatic Form in your performances

To be able to explain in detail how Dramatic Form enhances Drama
FORM
Learn the Skill:
The form of a Drama is the way that the story is told, the way the characters play their parts, and/or the way the themes are explored.

For example:
Tragedy/ Comedy/ Melodrama/ Musical/ Naturalistic/ Surreal
FORM
Apply the Skill:
Taking the performance concepts you created, explore making it:
Comedy
Tragedy
Naturalistic
Surreal
FORM
Demonstrate the Skill:
Perform
FORM
Evaluate the Skill:
For your group, which Form was the most successful? Why?
How has included Form, altered the Plot/Action/Content/Climax?
Symbols
HOW will you show what you are Learning?
By exploring the use of Symbols in performance

By including a Symbol within your performance

By being able to explain the use of Symbols in performance
Symbols
WHY are you Learning?
To be able to use Symbols in performance

To be able to explain the use of symbols within performance

To be able to use a highly thought through symbol which suggests something emotive to the audience
Symbols
Learn the Skill:
Dramas are produced to a great extent through the use of symbols - or representations - standing in for real things. Many of the following can be understood as symbols.

Props (eg a torn wedding photograph to represent a divorce)
Gestures (eg finger on lips as a symbol of silence)
Expressions (eg open mouth to represent surprise)
Costume (a white costume as a symbol of innocence)
Lighting (eg blue lighting to represent night-time)
Setting (dry ice vapour to represent a snowy wood)
Symbols
Apply the Skill:
Decide where in your performance you could include a Symbol.

Add this and rehearse
Symbols
Demonstrate
the Skill:
Perform back for the rest of the group
Symbols
Evaluate the Skill:
What was the group's Symbol?
Did they use it effectively?
The ways in which we CREATE the Drama
Things that hold the Drama together
Things that enhance the Drama
Movement, Mime, Gesture
HOW will you show you are Learning?
By exploring the use of movement within a speech

By applying both body language and facial expression to a speech

By explaining the use of Movement, Mime, and Gesture in performance
Movement, Mime, Gesture
WHY are you Learning?
To be able to use movement within a speech

To be able to use body language and facial expression appropriately in a performance

To be able to explain the use of Movement, Mime, and Gesture in performance
Movement, Mime, Gesture
Learn the Skill:
Watch the Monologues

How does the second one differ?

What works better? Why?
Movement, Mime, Gesture
Apply the Skill:
Using the given Monologues

First try it without movements

Then add movements
Movement, Mime, Gesture
Demonstrate the Skill:
Perform Monologues
Movement, Mime, Gesture
Evaluate the Skill:
How have they used movement?
Is it effective?
Is it appropriate?
Are there any movements that could have been included?
Set, Props, Lighting, Sound/Music
HOW are you showing you are Learning?
By creating a performance based on a given set

By making appropriate links to the set and how it reflects emotion

By explaining in detail how the design helps to enhance the performance
Set, Props, Lighting, Sound/Music
WHY are you Learning?
To be able to create a performance that uses Set design elements

To be able to make appropriate links to the set and how it reflects emotion

To be able to explain in detail how the design helps to enhance the performance
Set, Props, Lighting, Sound/Music
Learn the Skill:

Stage sets help create the background to a drama, but it's usually best to keep them simple. Shakespeare's stage used little in the way of set, and the modern trend is also to keep things low-key.
SET
Props are the items that are held or used by an actor in a scene to make it more realistic. These are also best kept to the minimum. A briefcase might be enough to portray a businessman, without using a phone as well, or a hat might signify one character when it's on and a different character when it's off.
PROPS
As well as helping the actors to be seen, lighting can also indicate the time of day, or a place, and can focus audience attention on a character.

Using certain coloured gels can also portray emotion for the seen.
LIGHTING
Sound and music obviously play a crucial part in musicals, but they can also be used in other productions to:

add atmosphere
emphasize action happening on stage
help set the scene
indicate a change of time or location
focus attention on to a character
Sound/Music
Set, Props, Lighting, Sound/Music
Apply the Skill:
In groups of 4 create a performance based on the set design given.

You may use the music given in your own way,
Set, Props, Lighting, Sound/Music
Demonstrate the Skill:
Perform
Set, Props, Lighting, Sound/Music
Evaluate the Skill:
How have the group used the set design?

Was it effective? Why?

What could be improved? Why?

What is the significance of using Set, Props, Lighting, and Sound/Music.
Space and Levels
HOW will you show you are Learning?
By creating a performance which explores the use of space and levels

By demonstrating through performance how space and levels portray relationships

By explaining how space and levels enhance the performance
Space and Levels
WHY are you Learning?
To be able to create a performance which explores the use of space and levels

To be able to demonstrate through performance how space and levels portray relationships

To be able to explain how space and levels enhance the performance
Space and Levels
Learn the Skill:
The acting area is generally called a stage, and might be a proper stage or just an area of a hall or small room. How this area is used will affect how your drama will look.

Levels give a stage more visual interest, and the various levels can be useful, as they allow different characters the opportunity to communicate different status, for example. The various levels might represent different locations, or may just allow the audience to see particular bits of the action more clearly
Space and Levels
Apply the Skill:
Using the given duologue work on performing it in the following ways (Each pair will be given a way to perform it):

Close together with constant eye contact
Far apart with no eye contact
Close together with no eye contact
Far apart with constant eye contact
One character circling the other with eye contact
One character circling the other with no eye contact
One character standing still looking at the other, whilst the other walks around the space with no eye contact
One character standing still no eye contact, the other walking around the space with constant eye contact
Space and Levels
Demonstrate the Skill:
Perform

Close together with constant eye contact
Far apart with no eye contact
Close together with no eye contact
Far apart with constant eye contact
One character circling the other with eye contact
One character circling the other with no eye contact
One character standing still looking at the other, whilst the other walks around the space with no eye contact
One character standing still no eye contact, the other walking around the space with constant eye contact
Space and Levels
Evaluate the Skill:
Which was was most effective?
Did experimenting with the space and focus alter the meaning of the text?


Close together with constant eye contact
Far apart with no eye contact
Close together with no eye contact
Far apart with constant eye contact
One character circling the other with eye contact
One character circling the other with no eye contact
One character standing still looking at the other, whilst the other walks around the space with no eye contact
One character standing still no eye contact, the other walking around the space with constant eye contact
Space and Levels
Apply the Skill:
Take your duologue and work on experimenting with the Levels.
How could altering the levels change the impact of the piece?

Make the duologue your own.
Space and Levels
Demonstrate the Skill:
Perform
Space and Levels
Evaluate the Skill:
What is the importance of using SPACE and LEVELs in performance? In what way does it enhance it?
Voice and Spoken Language
HOW are you showing you are Learning?
By taking part in activities which explore the voice and spoken language

By applying different vocal skills to explore ways of expressing speech

By explaining with confidence the importance of voice and spoken language in performance
Voice and Spoken Language
WHY are you Learning?
To be able to explore the voice and spoken language

To be able to apply different vocal skills to explore ways of expressing speech

To be able to explain with confidence the importance of voice and spoken language in performance
Voice and Spoken Language
Learn the Skill:
When using your voice during your drama, think about:

Tone - does your voice sounds appropriate - perhaps harsh or soft, angry or happy? Is it suitable for the character you're playing?
Volume - have you got the loudness or quietness of your speech right? Can everyone in the audience hear you?
Pitch - does your character speak with a high or low pitched voice? If you were playing a hanging judge, would a squeaky voice sound right?
Pace - how quickly do you say your lines? Too fast, and the audience won't keep up, too slow and they might get bored. Can you alter the pace according to what's happening in the drama? (Ask friends for feedback!)
Clarity - have you practiced speaking very, very clearly? It's crucial!

Spoken language
There's a vast range of spoken language you can use in a drama. The words you choose need to be just right for the character, the setting and the situation. Here are some pointers to help you.

Language registers - remember to change the way you speak to different people. We wouldn't say "Hello, darlin', you all right?" to a judge in real life, so if you're playing a judge in a drama, keep the register formal, and don't ask your witness "Right, mate, what happened next then?" Our language register should match the role that we play.
Verse - use this in stylised drama, or in genres such as pantomime.
Shakespearean language - apart from the obvious, this can be useful if you want to reflect Shakespearean times, or to evoke Shakespeare's plays.
Slang - use this if you want to reflect down-to-earth daily life. We might have local words for various objects, for example. However, remember not to use slang in the wrong setting. Using 'OK' instead of 'Yes' in a Victorian drama, for example, would sound very strange!
Voice and Spoken Language
Apply the Skill:
Task One:
Using the given script firstly read your section without any vocal expression
Task Two:
Now begin to add the vocal tone you feel is appropriate.
-See Unit 3 Criteria
Voice and Spoken Language
Demonstrate the Skill:
Perform
Voice and Spoken Language
Evaluate the Skill:
How does adding vocal expression enhance the performance?
Voice and Spoken Language
Apply and Demonstrate the Skill:
As a class we shall be reading from a radio play- we need to think carefully about our Vocal expression due to the language we shall be speaking.
Voice and Spoken Language
Evaluate the Skill:
How does spoken language effect performance?
Now use these things in everything we do, and you will succeed!!!
And that is the end of that!
CONNECT
REMEMBER...
USE OF VOICE...
WARM UP...
ACTIVATE
Naudojant balso per savo dramos, galvoti apie:

Tonas - ar jūsų balsas skamba - gal šiurkštus ar minkštas, piktas ar laimingas? Ar tinka pobūdžio, jūs žaidžiate?
Tomas - Ar turite garsumą arba ramybę savo kalboje? Ar visi į auditoriją išklausyti tave?
Pitch - jūsų personažas kalba su aukšto ar žemo tono balsu? Jei jums buvo žaisti kabinti teisėjui, Pīkstošs balso garso tiesa?
Tempas - kaip greitai jūs sakote, jūsų linijos? Per greitai, ir auditorija negali suspėti, per lėtas ir jie gali nuobodžiauti. Galite pakeisti tempą, atsižvelgiant į tai, kas vyksta dramoje? (Paprašykite draugų atsiliepimus!)
Aiškumas - jūs praktikuojama labai paprasta kalba, labai aiškiai? Tai labai svarbu!

Kalba
Yra platų šnekamosios kalbos galite naudoti dramos. Žodžiai, kuriuos pasirinksite, turi būti tik teisę, pobūdį, nustatant ir situaciją. Štai keletas patarimų, kurie padės jums.

Kalba sąvadai - nepamirškite pakeisti taip, kaip jūs kalbėti su skirtingais žmonėmis. Mes nenorėjo pasakyti "Labas, darlin", jūs visi tiesa? "realiame gyvenime teisėjo, kad jei žaidi teisėją dramos, kad registras formalus ir neklausia tavo liudytojo "Teisė, mate, kas nutiko toliau tada?" Mūsų kalbos registras turi atitikti vaidmenį, kad mes grojame.
Eilėraštis - tai stilizuotas dramos žanrų kaip pantomima.
Šekspyro kalba - išskyrus akivaizdus, tai gali būti naudinga, jei norite, kad atspindėtų Šekspyro kartus, arba sukelti Šekspyro pjesių.
Slengas - naudoti tai, jei norite, kad atspindėtų žemyn į žemę kasdienį gyvenimą. Mes galime turėti vietos žodžių įvairių objektų, pvz. Tačiau atminkite, nenaudoti žargoną netinkamus nustatymus. Naudojant "Gerai", o ne "Taip" Viktorijos dramos, pavyzdžiui, skambėtų labai keista!
DEMONSTRATE
CONSOLIDATE
TBC...
Full transcript