Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Women's Roles in the 1930s

No description
by

Jamileh Shiber

on 18 April 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Women's Roles in the 1930s

Women's Roles In
The 1930's By: Jamileh Shiber How the Workforce
Treated Women Blame the lady Impact: Choices and thoughts
"We can't offered this" Fighting Off the Dust "You don't even need a job!" "Women's Work" " Women are thief's!" Activist Mill Worker The Typical Role of Southern Women in the 1930's Homemaker- noun, feminine. A person, especially a housewife, who manages a home. The media sent women a clear message: because jobs are scarce, you belong in the home, not the work place. Even the education system insisted that women not take on careers after graduation. Yet at the same time educated women to prepare her for the roles and responsibility's of a wife and mother. The education of a women was for the improvement of her family. An educated woman = an educated family. Most southern women worked in mills. Weather it was a plaid, silk, cotton or textile mills. Girls as young as 16 droped out of school to work in these mills to help support their families. They worked difficult long hours with few breaks. In the 1930s more women worked outside of the home as a social activist. These Activists had a powerful approach towards solving racial problems and that their primary focus was on addressing racial violence and health problems rather than systemic problems. They also fought to prevent lynching After the Stock Market crash in 1929 women were viewed as stealing work from men. They were ether fired or in viler terms they were given less pay and treated unfairly to drive them into unemployment. The New Deal program the Civilian Conservation Corps (1933), had a formal policy against hiring women. Also if employers did hire women they preferred white women, over black or Hispanic women. The chances of a women getting a job was extremely slim because unless she is single and self-supporting she belongs at home with her family being a homemaker. Also part time jobs barely made ends meet. "Sex-typed" work (work that employers assign to one sex or the other) was mainly in favor of men. Laws in 1932-1937 made it illegal for more than one person in a household work within the federal civil service. Women were often blamed for the Depression because of their entry into the workforce in the 1920's. The Great Depression impacted a woman's choices. Whether it was postponing marriage or even having a family, to having to share living space because everything was too expensive. Or by changing a woman's thoughts. The media, government, and various published print promoted and told women how to act, speak, behave, please, and cook. Practicality controlling them, "...her shabbiness will soon bore her husband, her children, and her friends." Southern women would rise early to make sure that the rags and tape that were stuffed underneath door sills and window ledges were tight and secure. They lived in fear of the deadly dust storms. Fearing the dirt would suffocate their loved ones on the farms. Most farms had no running water and modern washers so everything had to be washed by hand and water would have hauled from the well and then boiled. Limited Rights African American Women White women have earned many civil rights in the early 20th century but African-American women had not. Most of the available jobs stated that they were "white only" job offers. They were limited to jobs like housekeepers, maids, nurses, ect. This only increased the discrimination towards them. The 19th Amendment granted women the right to vote and supposedly gave them all the equal rights compared to men, but women were still being constantly discriminated especially women of color. Also most of these rights did not effect African-American women. Plus women had no guarantee to equal pay or treatment. Women needed ensured safety when doing common things. Home? On the Farm? The woman is the homemaker. She cooks, cleans, washes, and irons. Takes care of her children and husband. The task of homemaking was difficult with the Depression. Cuts in the family budget made women supervised the feeding and clothing of her family to save. They sewed homemade clothing and preformed "Outwork" (labor for wages at home). The Homemaker Individual Roles Depression Hardships Jobs that women had were primarily of the service industry. These include clerical workers, teachers, nurses, and domestics (maids & nannies). Women had lower pay scales and sometimes employers would fail to pay their workers on time. Many New Deal job programs assigned women in traditional house keeping roles. Which had a racial and gendered stereotype because the majority were African-American women. Most southern women lived in rural lands. They preformed common farm tasks like milking cows, feeding, and helping maintain the fields. Fear of the Ballot Written Information About "Role of Southern Women in the 1930s" Women were "Homemakers" (noun, feminine. A person, especially a housewife, who manages a home). The woman is the homemaker. She cooks, cleans, washes, and irons. Takes care of her children and husband. The media sent women a clear message: because jobs are scarce, you belong in the home, not the work place. Even the education system insisted that women not take on careers after graduation, but at the same time educated women to prepare her for the roles and responsibility's of a wife and mother. The education of a women was for the improvement of her family. Most southern women worked in mills. Weather it was a plaid, silk, cotton or textile mills. Girls as young as 16 drop out of school to work in these mills to help support their families. They worked difficult long hours with few breaks. In the 1930s more women that worked outside of the home as a social activist. These Activists had a powerful approach towards solving racial problems and that their primary focus was on addressing racial violence and health problems rather than systemic problems. They also fought to prevent lynching.
After the Stock Market crash in 1929 women were viewed as "stealing" work from men. They were ether fired or were given less pay and treated unfairly to drive them into unemployment. The New Deal program the Civilian Conservation Corps (1933), had a formal policy against hiring women. Also employers preferred white women, over black or Hispanic women. Jobs that women had were primarily of the service industry like clerical workers, teachers, nurses, and domestics (maids & nannies). Women had lower pay scales and sometimes employers would fail their workers on time. Many New Deal job programs assigned women in traditional house keeping roles. Like Housekeeping which had a racial and gendered stereotype because the majority were African-American women. The chances of a women getting a job was extremely slim because unless she is single and self-supporting she belongs at home. Also part time jobs barely made ends meet. "Sex-typed" work (work that employers assign to one sex or the other) was mainly in favor of men. Laws in 1932-1937 made it illegal for more than one person in a household work within the federal civil service.
Women were often blamed for the Depression because of their entry into the workforce in the 1920's. The Great Depression impacted a woman's choices greatly. Whether it was postponing marriage (to help support their families) or even waiting to have a family, to having to share living space because everything was too expensive. Or by changing a woman's thoughts. The media, government, and various published print promoted and told women how to act, speak, behave, please, and cook. Practicality controlling them, "...her shabbiness will soon bore her husband, her children, and her friends." The task of homemaking was difficult with the Depression. Cuts in the family budget made women supervise the feeding and clothing of their family to save. They sewed homemade clothing and preformed "Outwork" (labor for wages at home). Most southern women lived in rural lands. They preformed common farm tasks like milking cows, feeding, and helping maintain the fields. Durring the dust bowl southern women would have to rise early to make sure that the rags and tape that were stuffed underneath door sills and window ledges were tight and secure. They lived in fear of the deadly dust storms. Fearing the dirt would suffocate their loved ones on the farms. Most farms had no running water nor modern washers so everything had to be washed by hand and water would have hauled from the well and then boiled.
The 19th Amendment granted women the right to vote and supposedly gave them all the equal rights compared to men, but women were still being constantly discriminated especially women of color. Also most of these rights did not effect African-American women. Plus women had no guarantee to equal pay or treatment. Women needed ensured safety when doing common things. White women have earned many rights in the early 20th century but African-American women had not. Most of the available jobs stated that they were "white only" job offers. African American women were limited to jobs like housekeepers, maids, nurses, ect. This only increased the discrimination towards them.
Full transcript