Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

The Harlem Renaissance

The things that powered the harlem renaissance.
by

Zackir Metcalf

on 4 March 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of The Harlem Renaissance

Art
The Harlem Renaissance
The Harlem Renaissance
Were going to take you on a trip Through African American History.
Darius H:Music
China C:Literature
Katlyn W:Fashion
Tyjay S:Dance

Art Allowed african Americans to express themselves.
African-American artists were able to create accurate portrayals of their lives and experiences that combated the negative, racist depictions that existed before the movement.
Visual Artist has played a key Role in creating depictions of the Harlem Renaissance.
Aaron Douglas
1898 - 1979
Aaron Douglas was born in Kansas in 1898. He received a Bachelors Degree in art from the university of NeBraska.Aaron Douglas became the first president of the Harlem Artist Guild.
James Lescesne Wells
At the age of thirteen, he won first prize in painting and a second prize in woodworking at the Florida State Fair.James Lesesne Wells was a leading graphic artist and art teacher, whose work reflected the life of the Harlem Renaissance.
1902-1993
Archibald J. Motley
Lets meet some artist...
1891-1981
Archibald John Motley, Junior was an American painter. He studied painting at the Art Institute of Chicago during the 1910s.Archibald's colorful chronicling of the African-American experience during the 1920s and 1930s is what he is most famous.He is considered one of the major contributors to the Harlem Renaissance.Archibald never lived Harlem unlike many other Renaissance artists, Archibald Motley, Jr. was born in New Orleans and most of his life was spent in Chicago.
Thanks
For
listening !
Archibald J. Motley
1891-1981
Archibald John Motley, Junior was an American painter. He studied painting at the Art Institute of Chicago during the 1910s.Archibald's colorful chronicling of the African-American experience during the 1920s and 1930s is what he is most famous.He is considered one of the major contributors to the Harlem Renaissance.Archibald never lived Harlem unlike many other Renaissance artists, Archibald Motley, Jr. was born in New Orleans and most of his life was spent in Chicago.
Archibald J. Motley
1891-1981
Archibald John Motley, Junior was an American painter. He studied painting at the Art Institute of Chicago during the 1910s.Archibald's colorful chronicling of the African-American experience during the 1920s and 1930s is what he is most famous.He is considered one of the major contributors to the Harlem Renaissance.Archibald never lived Harlem unlike many other Renaissance artists, Archibald Motley, Jr. was born in New Orleans and most of his life was spent in Chicago.
Archibald J. Motley
1891-1981
Archibald John Motley, Junior was an American painter. He studied painting at the Art Institute of Chicago during the 1910s.Archibald's colorful chronicling of the African-American experience during the 1920s and 1930s is what he is most famous.He is considered one of the major contributors to the Harlem Renaissance.Archibald never lived Harlem unlike many other Renaissance artists, Archibald Motley, Jr. was born in New Orleans and most of his life was spent in Chicago.
Archibald J. Motley
1891-1981
Archibald John Motley, Junior was an American painter. He studied painting at the Art Institute of Chicago during the 1910s.Archibald's colorful chronicling of the African-American experience during the 1920s and 1930s is what he is most famous.He is considered one of the major contributors to the Harlem Renaissance.Archibald never lived Harlem unlike many other Renaissance artists, Archibald Motley, Jr. was born in New Orleans and most of his life was spent in Chicago.
Dance
The Shimmy, The Cakewalk, The Charleston and The Lindy Hop were all dance that were originated During the Harlem Renaissance and is still popular today,in some places.
The Charleston
The Cakewalk
The Shimmy
Literature
Music
Fashion
The Harlem Renaissance boasts some of the most elaborate and intrepid trends in fashion ever seen in history. The period is characterized by intrepid suits for men and astonishing evening gowns and pearl jewelry for women.

Men
During this time period for African American men was suits, the suits material were made of various materials ranging from wool and Lenin.In this time period suits gave a an affirmative statement which concerns the wonderful joy of living. Also suits were made to be fitted to one individual. Suits of that of this time period are very similar to those of today. The Zoot Suit the to most popular suit during the Harlem Renaissance.
Women wore extravagant ball gowns and beautiful cocktail dresses. women often created their own dresses added rhinestones and other sparkling decorations. women would compliment their attire with silk gloves and high heels for their assemble. The clothing for women was designed to show elegance, flamboyancy. Women were very innovative and were capable of making new styles that was not yet seen in America.
Women
There were many accessories that goes along with these styles of clothing. feather hats with pocket watched with chain for men .The pocket watch serves partial use, but give the attire a unique flare. For women pearl jewelery was a signature for female’s fashion. very often women wore rings over their gloves for the evening, they wore fur coats and and beautiful shawls to compliment them.
Accessories
Fashion trends that developed during the Harlem Renaissance period continue to influence many sectors of modern society. These fashion trends can be seen in movies such as "Malcolm X" and "Harlem Nights." It also has been highlighted to help sell real estate. Harlem Renaissance fashion has become widely accepted and showcased by Americans in almost every sector of modern society.
Fashion trends
Shoes
A shimmy is a dance move in which the body is held still, except for the shoulders , which are alternated back and forth
Its origins in slavery and the plantation south, the Cakewalk was the sole organized and even condoned forum for servants to mock their masters. A send-up of the rich folks in the "Big House," the cakewalk mocked the aristocratic and grandiose mannerisms of southern high-society
Art From the Harlem Renaissance has greatly influenced art today.
The Charleston was a dance that involved many jazz and tap-style movements. It became popular during the Harlem Renaissance because it combined popular European steps, African movements and jazz music

Honors English 10
$4A
1/20/2014
Women's shoes during the Harlem Renaissance were usually high heels and they were quite often self designed or specially made.For men they laced top dressed shoes.
Famous Books
Authors
Poetry
Apollo Theater
Genres
Singers and Musicians
Savory Ballroom
This Presentation was brought to you by:
Zackir Metcalf: Art
It has been argued that the Harlem Renaissance is the defining moment in African American literature because of an unprecedented outburst of creative activity among black writers. The importance of this movement to African American literary art lies in the efforts of its writers to exalt the heritage of African Americans, and to use their unique culture as a means toward re-defining African American literary expression.
Published: September 18, 1937

Jazz poetry is a literary genre defined as poetry necessarily informed by jazz music—that is, poetry in which the poet responds to and writes about jazz. Jazz poetry, like the music itself, encompasses a variety of forms, rhythms, and sounds. Beginning with the birth of blues and jazz at the beginning of the twentieth century, jazz poetry is can be seen as a thread that runs through the Harlem Renaissance, the Beat movement, and the Black Arts Movement—and it is still vibrant today. From early blues to free jazz to experimental music, jazz poets use their appreciation for the music as poetic inspiration.

Countee
cullen
Langston
Hughes
The Harlem Renaissance The Apollo Theater played an important role in the Harlem Renaissance. It provided a place for African-Americans to exhibit their literary abilities, and was one of the first theaters to even allow African Americans to perform.
Black literary writers covered such issues as black life in the South and the North, racial identity, racial issues, and equality through poetry, prose, novels, and fiction. Some of the more popular writers tackling these issues included Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes, Countee Cullen, and Jessie Redmon Fauset.
Zora Neale
Hurston
Jessie Redmon
Fauset
The music of the Harlem Renaissance - including jazz, swing, and big band - was an inherent expression of the basic rise from the custody of racial prejudice experienced by African Americans.
Jazz was all the rage during the 1920s. Extremely popular in Harlem, historians agree that the musical genre of jazz was most influential during the Harlem Renaissance period, and its style and characteristics would influence many classical composers. Jazz music not only coursed its way through the United States, but found tremendous popularity in Paris, France as well.
Fats Waller
Bessie Smith
Billie Holliday
Louis Armstrong
Like Dancing, a lot of the musicians and singers performed at the Savory Ballroom.Most of the famous singers and musicians played here.
Louis Armstrong
Zackir Metcalf: Art

Darius H:Music
China C:Literature
Katlyn W:Fashion
Tyjay S:Dance
Full transcript