Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

The Life of an Aircraft Mechanic

By Gaines Myrick
by

Gaines Myrick

on 14 September 2012

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of The Life of an Aircraft Mechanic

aircraft mechanic education And/or training finance (salary) Duties/responsibilities on a daily basis work hours By Gaines Myrick work environment The Life of an... The End... or is it? a famous airplane mechanic: Douglas Corrigan Douglas Corrigan was born in Galveston, Texas on 22 January 1907; he died at Santa Anna, California on 19 December 1995. Works Cited http://www.prohibitionists.org/History/votes/Douglas_Corrigan_bio.html Most mechanics learn their part at an FAA-Approved Aviation Maintenance Technician School. Coursework typically lasts 18 to 24 months and serves training with the tools and equipment operated on the job. About 1/3 of these schools award 2 or 4-year degrees in avionics, aviation technology, or aviation maintenance management. More and more employers are looking more enthusiastic on those with a Bachelor's Degree. Aircraft trade schools are placing more focus on technologies being used in new airplanes, such as turbine engines, composite materials, and aviation electronics. These technical advances require mechanics to have stronger backgrounds in composite materials and electronics. Gammon, 2007, pp. 137-138 Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2012-13 Edition, Aircraft and Avionics Equipment Mechanics and Technicians,
on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/ooh/installation-maintenance-and-repair/aircraft-and-avionics-equipment-mechanics-and-technicians.htm (visited September 11, 2012). Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2012-13 Edition, Aircraft and Avionics Equipment Mechanics and Technicians,
on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/ooh/installation-maintenance-and-repair/aircraft-and-avionics-equipment-mechanics-and-technicians.htm (visited September 11, 2012). Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2012-13 Edition, Aircraft and Avionics Equipment Mechanics and Technicians,
on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/ooh/installation-maintenance-and-repair/aircraft-and-avionics-equipment-mechanics-and-technicians.htm (visited September 11, 2012). Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2012-13 Edition, Aircraft and Avionics Equipment Mechanics and Technicians,
on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/ooh/installation-maintenance-and-repair/aircraft-and-avionics-equipment-mechanics-and-technicians.htm (visited September 11, 2012). Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2012-13 Edition, Aircraft and Avionics Equipment Mechanics and Technicians,
on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/ooh/installation-maintenance-and-repair/aircraft-and-avionics-equipment-mechanics-and-technicians.htm (visited September 11, 2012). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Douglas_Corrigan

http://www.bls.gov/ooh/installation-maintenance-and-repair/aircraft-and-avionics-equipment-mechanics-and-technicians.htm

http://www.forbes.com/pictures/efkk45ieei/no-10-aircraft-mechanics-and-service-technicians/

http://become-air-traffic-controller.com/aircraft-mechanic-job-description-and-salary-information/ Picture Sources Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2012-13 Edition, Aircraft and Avionics Equipment Mechanics and Technicians,
on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/ooh/installation-maintenance-and-repair/aircraft-and-avionics-equipment-mechanics-and-technicians.htm (visited September 11, 2012). The bottom 10 percent of aircraft mechanics obtained less than $33,630, and the top 10 percent earned more than $72,250. In May 2010, median year end salaries in industries applying the largest numbers of aircraft mechanics were along these lines: Scheduled air transportation $56,850
Federal executive branch $54,990
Aerospace products and parts manufacturing $54,970
Nonscheduled air transportation $51,540
Support activities for air transportation (including airports) $45,160 Mechanics work a lot. They usually work full time on rotating 8-hour shifts. Overtime and weekend work is sometimes required if needed. Day shifts are usually held for older and more experienced mechanics. They occasionally accept health and retirement benefits as part of their "allowance" package. Job outlook Employment of aircraft mechanics and avionics technicians is planned to grow 6 percent from 2010 to 2020, slower than the average for all jobs.

Over the next few years, many aircraft mechanics are expected to retire. As older mechanics retire and younger mechanics step up, many new job positions may open up. Similar jobs/occupations All about aircraft mechanics: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fw1yiNYPorY Certification The FAA requires that aircraft maintenance be done by certified mechanics or under the supervision of a supervised mechanic. The FAA offers separate certifications for airframe mechanics and engine mechanics, but most airlines prefer to hire mechanics with a connected Airframe and Powerplant (A&P) certificate. To qualify, mechanics must be at least 18 years of age, speak fluent English, and have 30 months of experience working on airframes and engines. In addition to having experience or formal training, applicants must pass written, oral, and practical exams that demonstrate required skills. To get the certification, candidates must pass all the tests within 2 years. Advancement As aircraft mechanics build up experience, they may advance to lead mechanic, lead inspector, or shop supervisor. Opportunities are the best for those who have an aircraft inspector's approval. To get an inspector's approval, a mechanic must have held an A&P certificate for at least 3 years, within 24 months of hands-on experience. In addition, as a bachelor's degree has become increasingly important for career advancement, some mechanics continue their education. Mechanics with broad experience in maintenance and repair might become inspectors with the FAA. With additional business and management training, some may open their own maintenance facility. Normally, mechanics have advanced from general aviation jobs to airline jobs. Because wages are similar between general aviation and airline companies, however, mechanics also should acknowledge the work environment as they search for jobs. Although airline jobs come with replacement travel perks, these mechanics often have to work outside, whereas mechanics at corporations or repair shops often work in climate-controlled buildings. Aircraft mechanics and avionic technicians held about 142,300 jobs in 2010. About 87 percent were mechanics and the rest were avionic technicians. Positions of aircraft mechanics and avionic technicians is focused in a small number of business. In 2010, the following industries employed the largest amounts of aircraft mechanics: Scheduled air transportation 26%
Support activities for air transportation (including airports) 23%
Aerospace products and parts manufacturing 16%
Federal government, excluding postal service 16%
Nonscheduled air transportation 4% Mechanics and/or technicians work in hangars, in repair stations, or on airfields. They often have to meet harsh deadlines to continue flight schedules. At the same time, they must go on with safety standards, and doing both can cause a great amount of stress. Injuries Mechanics often pick up heavy objects, handle dangerous chemicals, or operate large power tools. They repeatedly stand, lie, or kneel in awkward positions and work on scaffolds or ladders. noise and vibrations are common when engines are being tested, so ear protection is required. Because airline mechanics work outside, they must often face hot and cold temperatures. Although their work is not naturally dangerous, aircraft mechanics and service technicians experience rates of injuries and illnesses are higher than the average across all occupations. Aircraft mechanics repair and preform scheduled maintenance on certain aircraft. They also inspect and repair airplanes and helicopters required by the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration). Aircraft mechanics typically do the following:

Examine aircraft frames and parts for defects
Diagnose mechanical or electrical problems
Measure parts for wear, using precision instruments
Read maintenance manuals to identify methods of repair
Repair wings, brakes, electrical systems, and other aircraft components
Replace defective parts, using hand tools
Test aircraft parts with gauges and other diagnostic equipment
Inspect completed work to ensure that it meets performance standards
Keep records of maintenance and repair work Some mechanics work on many different types of aircraft, such as jets, propeller-driven airplanes, and helicopters. Others specialize in 1 section of a particular type of aircraft, such as the engine, hydraulics, or electrical system of a jet. In small, independent repair shops, mechanics usually inspect and repair many different types of aircraft. Most mechanics who work on civilian aircraft have the FAA's Airframe and Powerplant (A&P) certificate. Mechanics who have this certificate are authorized to work on any part of the aircraft, except electronic flight instruments.

Repair mechanics specialize in repair work rather than inspection. They find and fix problems that pilots describe. Mechanics must figure out the problem and replace any defective electrical parts. They must work as fast as safety permits so that the aircraft can be put back into service quickly. So basically they do less inspection and mainly repair work. This mechanic is preparing to refuel this plane. These airplane mechanics are making sure that the system is running properly. This is a mechanic repairing an airplane's engine. Airplane mechanics often have to climb, reach, and/or balance on the plane's exterior. This mechanic is wearing his ear protection "muffs"
Full transcript