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Citing Evidence to Make Inferences

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by

Luann Hughes

on 16 June 2014

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Transcript of Citing Evidence to Make Inferences

Key Vocabulary
ev·i·dence
noun


: a clue which shows that something else is true


Example: crime scene
What's happening here?
Look closely to think critically:
What explicit details can I see?
What do I already know?
What can I infer that is not shown?
Key Vocabulary
cite
verb

: to write or say the words of a book, author, website, newspaper, etc. to use as an example to support an idea

Example: NBA finals -
Spurs: ___, Heat: ___
--ESPN--
Citing Evidence to Make Plot Inferences RL6.1
I can support an inference about plot when I cite evidence from a picture or text.
Mrs. Hughes
Expectations:
Talking
Quiet Signal
Exiting
Key Vocabulary
Key Vocabulary
ex·plic·it
adjective

: very clear and complete, leaving no doubt about the meaning


"Just the facts!"
in·fer·ence
noun

: a conclusion or opinion that is
not
stated in the text, but is based on known facts or evidence


A hypothesis
- an educated guess.
How are we doing? Let's try it again.
What's going on?
Look closely to think critically:
What explicit details can I see?
What do I already know?
What can I infer that is not shown?
So, it's the
explicit details
("just the facts"), added to what we already know,
that help us
make
i
nferences
(educated guesses)!
Good to go?
You can also look closely for evidence and make inferences about plot when
reading
or
listening to

text
.
She looked up at the basketball hoop. Slowly, she dribbled the ball, dreading the moment when she would have to take the shot. She remembered the last time she stood on the line. Just like tonight, the game's outcome depended on her. Last time, she failed. Her teammates watched anxiously. She took a deep breath, let go of the ball, and watched its arch. Swoosh!
Inference:
The story must be about a basketball game. I think this because she is looking at a basketball hoop.
Inference: She must be getting ready to take a foul shot. I know that "the line" is where players take foul shots.
Inference:
She's getting ready to shoot.
I know this because the text says she's "dreading the moment she would have to take the shot."
Inference:
The last time she missed the shot, her team lost. In the sentence before it says they were depending on her.
Inference:
Being nervous might make her miss so she's trying to calm down. The text says "she took a deep breath."
Inference:
She made the basket! Her team won the game. I know this because the author wrote "swoosh", which is the sound a basketball makes when it goes in the basket.
Let's practice together...
She looked up at the basketball hoop. Slowly, she dribbled the ball, dreading the moment when she would have to take the shot. She remembered the last time she stood on the line. Just like tonight, the game's outcome depended on her. Last time, she failed. Her teammates watched anxiously. She took a deep breath, let go of the ball, and watched its arch. Swoosh!
Flip the page
Using Evidence to Make Inferences About Plot

She looked up at the basketball hoop. Slowly, she dribbled the ball, dreading the moment when she would have to take the shot. She remembered the last time she stood on the line. Just like tonight, the game's outcome depended on her. Last time, she failed. Her teammates watched anxiously. She took a deep breath, let go of the ball, and watched its arch. Swoosh!

1. Which inference below is supported by evidence from the text? Place a check mark in the box.

The girl is a "ball hog".
She doesn’t like basketball.
The last time she missed the shot, her team lost.
She’s too short to make the shot.

2. Underline any words or phrases in the paragraph that provide evidence for this inference.


Can you figure out what's going on in a photo by looking closely at the details?

Can you figure out what's going on in a story by using evidence to make an educated guess?

Share results
Independent Work Stations
Writing
What might people infer about the things you like to do based on how you act, what you say, or what you wear? Are these inferences correct? What evidence would someone have to support their inference about what you like to do?
Infer plot with images
Select 3 images from magazines, picture books, comic strips, newspapers or photographs found in your classroom. Make an inference about what's happening. Cite what evidence supports your inference.
Online Practice
Log on to http://www.ereadingworksheets.com/reading-worksheets/online-inference-practice-1.htm

Click the word "
Here
", enter your name, and take the 10 question quiz.

Click on the printer icon to print your results.
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Full transcript