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Easter Wings

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by

Kelly Hintz

on 10 April 2015

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Transcript of Easter Wings

Easter Wings
Concrete Poetry
A concrete poem is a poem that forms a picture of the topic or follows the contours of a shape that is suggested by the topic.


Stanzas
In the first half of the first stanza, Herbert describes the downward spiral of Adam and how because of him, his life suffers too.
In the first half of the second stanza, Herbert gets serious about sickness, shame, and sin.


Symbolism
Bird References (Flight, Wings, Imp)
Discussion Questions:
1. How does the shape of the poem play with the words? If there was no shape, how would it change it's meaning?
George Herbert
1593-1633
Easter Wings - George Herbert
By: Kelly Hintz
Herbert’s poems have been characterized by a deep religious devotion, linguistic precision, metrical agility, and ingenious use of conceit. He is ranked as one of the greatest Metaphysical poets.


“Nothing can be more pure, manly, or unaffected," -Quote about George Herbert's poetry
Often referred to as "shaped verse"
Resources
http://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poet/george-herbert
Shape Conveying Meaning
Illustration of wings

Line 19
"imp my wing on thine"
Allows man closer communion with God
In the second half of each stanza, Herbert turns his emotion around. He asks to rise up with the resurrected Christ and celebrate Easter's victory.
http://www.shmoop.com/easter-wings/summary.html
Line 19-20
"For if I imp my wing on thine, affliction shall advance the flight in me."
Reference to Falling
Line 3-5
"Decaying more and more, till he became most poor."
Line 9-10
"And sing this thy victories, then shall the fall further the flight in me."
2. How do the line lengths compare to the words?
Major Themes
Encouragement
Seek Christ for freedom from guilt
What doesn't kill you makes you stronger
Full transcript