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The Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale

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Nancy Baur

on 15 February 2012

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Transcript of The Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale

The Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale Double click to crop it if necessary (cc) photo by Metro Centric on Flickr (cc) photo by Franco Folini on Flickr The Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale or VABS is one of the various assessment tools that can be used to help diagnose and evaluate the special needs of students. The focus of this particular test is the measurement of the adaptive behaviors, including the ability to cope with environmental changes, to learn new everyday skills and to demonstrate independence. Purpose of the test

The primary purpose of the VABS is to assess the social abilities of an individual, whose age ranges from preschool to 18 years old. The results reliably reveal crucial information for diagnosing various disabilities, including autism, Asperger syndrome, mental retardation, and speech impairment. Survey Form – This is the edition that is closest in content to the original version of VABS that was published in 1984 by the American Guidance Services. It has 297 items distributed over the four domains. The child’s parent or primary caregiver answers the items, usually within 20 minutes to an hour. Expanded Form – This edition is most useful to teachers and psychologists who are planning the IEP of the special child. With 280 questions added to the first 297 questions of the survey form for a total of 577 items, the results will provide a comprehensive evaluation of the special child’s needs. The results are also used to put together any treatment or rehabilitative program. This edition can be completed within 60 to 90 minutes. Classroom Edition – This edition is composed of 244 items that evaluates a child’s adaptive behavior inside the classroom. The teacher answers the questions but only a qualified professional can interpret the scores.

What else do we need to know?
Limitations of the test

Due to the nature of its administration, in which adult observers, such as the parent and the teacher, answer the items, this assessment test is used to assess the adaptive behaviors only of individuals who are 18 years old and younger. In cases of individuals who are older and whose social functioning abilities have already been identified as below developmental expectations, the VABS can be utilized. Standardization

The Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale has been nationally standardized using respondents who were stratified according to factors that could significantly influenced the answers to the items, such as gender, age, race, geographical region, size of community, and parental education. For the interpretation of scores, the procedure was developed by Angoff and Robertson and similar to that of the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children, in which there are score equivalents for the raw scores in each domain, percentile ranks, age equivalents, adaptive levels, and maladaptive levels. Reliability: 1) Split half-reliability: Internal reliability tests of both the Survey and Expanded Forms were performed on caregivers of children under age 19. The Survey Form split half coefficients for the age groups under 3 ranged from .82 to .95 for the Domains and .96 to .98 for the Adaptive Behavior Composite; the Expanded Form split half coefficients ranged from .90 to .97 for the Domains and .98 to .99 for the Composite. (2) Test-retest reliability (mean of 17 days between tests): The Survey Form reliability coefficients for caregivers of children between the ages of 6 months and 2 years, 11 months ranged from .78 to .92 for the Domains and .90 for the Adaptive Behavior Composite. There were no test-retest reliability tests for the Expanded Form. (3) Interrater reliability: The Survey Form interrater reliability coefficients, with a mean of 8 days between the interviews of caregivers of children ages 6 months to 18 years, 11 months, ranged from .62 to .78 for the Domains and was .74 for the Adaptive Behavior Composite. There were no interrater reliability tests for the Expanded Form.
Internal consistency: Survey Form: Split half means for Domains .83 to .90; for Adaptive Behavior Composite .94 Expanded Form: Split half means for Domains .91 to .95; for Adaptive Behavior Composite .97 Classroom Edition: Coefficient Alpha means for Domains .80 to .95; for Adaptive Behavior Composite .98

Test - Retest:Survey Form: Means for Domains .81 to .86; for Adaptive Behavior Composite .88 (N=484)

Interrater: urvey Form: Correlations between two different interviewers, for Domains .62 to .78; for Adaptive Behavior Composite .74 (N=160)

The manual provides extensive data regarding reliability Validity: (1) Content validity included a literature review and field tests with caregivers. (2) Criterion-related validity: The correlations between the Adaptive Behavior Composite and the original VABS unadjusted Social Quotient and Silverstein’s Deviation Social Quotient (which corrects for inconsistencies in the Social Quotient) among caregivers of children between ages 6 months and 18 years, were both .55. Comparisons between the total of the raw scores for the four domains of the revised VABS and the original VABS yielded a correlation of .97 in a sample of mentally retarded adults and an age-adjusted partial correlation of .88 in a sample of hearing-impaired children. The correlation between the VABS and the Adaptive Behavior Inventory for Children, ages 5 to 11, was .58, and correlations between the revised VAB four domains and the AAMD Adaptive Behavior Scale, Part I, domains fell between .40 and .70. Correlations between VABS and the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children and the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-Revised, two intelligence tests, ranged from .07 to .52 and .12 to .37, respectively. The differential magnitudes of these correlations is said to support the assumption that adaptive behavior scales and intelligence and achievement scales measure different areas of functioning.
Construct: (1) Developmental progressions of raw scores with age.

(2) Principal components analyses of Domain standard scores; Principal factor analyses of Subdomain raw scores.


Concurrent: Correlations between the Vineland and other adaptive behavior scales (Vineland Social Maturity Scale, Adaptive Behavior Inventory for Children, AAMD Adaptive Behavior Scale); Correlations between the Vineland and intelligence tests of intelligence (K-ABC) and vocabulary (PPVT-R).

Clinical samples: upplementary norms are provided for the following special groups:

ambulatory and nonambulatory mentally retarded adults in residential facilities; ambulatory mentally retarded adults in residential facilities; nonambulatory mentally retarded adults in residential facilities; mentally retarded adults in nonresidential facilities; emotionally disturbed children in residential facilities; visually handicapped children in residential facilities; hearing impaired children in residential facilities.

The manuel provides extensive data on validity.
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