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Jhon Donne

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FRANCO FRANCO

on 9 December 2013

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Transcript of Jhon Donne

John Donne
"Batter my heart"

Jhon donne was born in London in 1572. He was an english poet and cleric in the Church of England. He was influenced by medieval culture and scientific discovers.
John Donne was born in London in 1572 and he died in 1630.
He was an English poet and cleric in the Church of England.
At the begging he made part of Catholic church, and after some recommendations from James I, the successor of the Elizabeth I, he renounced at Catholic faith and took part of the Church of England in 1615, when he was nominated priest.
He was involved in politic, in fact he left London with the royal fleet as a member of Parliament and diplomat.
Donne was influenced by medieval culture, in fact he wrote a lot of religious poems and sermons in English and Latin characterized by original metaphors. His most important techniques are irony, sudden beginnings and paradoxes.
He, also, was involved in the movement of the metaphysical poets that are a group of british poets of the 17th century whose works were characterized by the inventive use of conceits and by speculation about topics like love or religion.

Historical and social background.
John Donne lived in a period of transition during the Elizabethan age, in which Shakespeare wrote his plays. During that age Queen Elizabeth I persecuted the Catholics and maintained through efforts the Church of England, estabilished by her father Henry VIII. James I, the successor of Elizabeth, tolerated Catholicism, but he advised Donne that if he wanted to have a career he had to join the Church of England, so he did.
There were hard years for the England because the Queen had to fight against the "invincible spanish fleet", that tried to contrast the english maritime power between 1585 and 1604.
Batter my heart, three-person'd God, for y
ou

As yet but knock, breathe, shine, and seek to m
end
;
That I may rise and stand, o'erthrow me, and b
end

Your force to break, blow, burn, and make me n
ew
.
I, like an usurp'd town to another d
ue
,
Labor to admit you, but oh, to no
end
;
Reason, your viceroy in me, me should def
end
,
But is captiv'd, and proves weak or untr
ue
.
Yet dearly I love you, and would be lov'd f
ain
,
But am betroth'd unto your enem
y
;
Divorce me, untie or break that knot ag
ain
,
Take me to you, imprison me, for
I
,
Except you enthrall me, never shall be fr
ee
,
Nor ever chaste, except you ravish m
e
.
A
B
B
A
A
B
B
A

C
D
C
D
E
E
This sonnet is written in a iambic pentameter.
Its structural division is composed by an octect followed by a sestet.
Metaphor
Commentary
The speaker asks the “three-personed God” to “batter” his heart. God only knocks politely, breathes and shines. Like a town that has been captured by the enemy, which tries unsuccessfully to admit the army of its friends, the speaker works to admit God into his heart, but Reason has been captured by the enemy and proves “weak or untrue.” The speaker says that he loves God and wants to be loved, but he is like a maiden who is betrothed to God’s enemy. The speaker asks God to “divorce, untie, or break that knot again,” to take him prisoner.
This poem is an appeal to God in which the poet asks him brutal and violent overmastering. He wants God to perform shameful actions. The metaphors of the poem, like the speaker’s heart as a captured town, the speaker as a maiden betrothed to God’s enemy, are made with violent and powerful verbs such as divorce, break, batter and burn o create the image of God as a violent conqueror.
Only if God makes him prisoner he can be free and only if God ravishes him he can be chaste.
Full transcript