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Raw Milk vs. Processed Milk

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by

Craig Stewart

on 29 April 2011

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Transcript of Raw Milk vs. Processed Milk

Some people claim raw milk is bad for you and some claim it is good for you. The same goes for processed milk “There is no substitute for clean raw milk as a food so far as children are concerned. Science has not yet succeeded in providing, in the pasteurized variety, those essential qualities that are the only real foundation for a healthy child.”

This is a statement from Armchair Science, London (April 1938) Armchair Science is, or was, a British Medical Journal.

Some people claim that processed milk is bad for you and that it removes the nutrients you need from the milk. The best dairy beverage for your health is, in my opinion, fermented raw milk. If you take raw milk and inoculate it with bacterial cultures, then let it sit for a day or two, you end up with a living, predigested, nutritionally superior beverage that's so packed with life it's actually fizzy (carbonated due to the off-gassing of bacteria) when you make it yourself at home.

This attack on raw milk is dressed up to look like a public safety concern. Raw milk is dangerous, regulators claim, because the live cultures might get contaminated with unfriendly bacteria and harm someone. The preferred alternative, it seems, is to kill all the food so that it harms everyone equally.

Pasteurization destroys enzymes, diminishes vitamin content, denatures fragile milk proteins, destroys vitamins C, B12 and B6, kills beneficial bacteria, promotes pathogens and is associated with allergies, increased tooth decay, colic in infants, growth problems in children, osteoporosis, arthritis, heart disease and cancer. Average butterfat content from old-fashioned cows at the turn of the century was over 4% (or more than 50% of calories). Today butterfat comprises less than 3% (or less than 35% of calories). Worse, consumers have been duped into believing that low-fat and skim milk products are good for them. Only by marketing low-fat and skim milk as a health food can the modern dairy industry get rid of its excess poor-quality, low-fat milk from modern high-production herds.
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