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Anatomy & Physiology: The Lymphatic System

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james donahue

on 3 November 2014

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Transcript of Anatomy & Physiology: The Lymphatic System

Only lymph nodes filter lymph
The Lymphatic
System

arteries
veins
lymphatic
structures
heart
cervical
nodes
axillary
nodes
thoracic
duct
inguinal
nodes
subclavian v.
internal jugular v.
brachiocephalic v.
brachiocephalic v.
superior
vena
cava
internal jugular v.
subclavian v.
Two semi-independent parts:
lymphatic vessels (similar to blood vessels)
lymphatic tissues and organs
Function:
return leaked fluid and patrol for pathogens
Lymphatic capillaries


Lymphatic vessels


Lymphatic trunks
Lymphoid Cells
T - cells (mature in the thymus)
phagocytes
B - cells (mature in the bone marrow)
make antibodies
Lymph Nodes
Principle lymphoid organ
Concentrated in the inguinal, cervical and axillary regions
Function to filter the lymph and activate the immune system
nodes are bean shaped and laced with trabeculae
many afferent vessels enter, few efferent vessels leave
LYMPHATIC VESSELS
POSTERIOR
ABDOMINAL
WALL
(the heart has been removed)
Other Lymphoid Organs
Spleen
Thymus
Tonsils
Spleen
largest lymphoid organ
curls around the stomach
site of WBC proliferation
immune surveillance of the blood
stores breakdown products of RBCs
fetal site of erythropoiesis
stores thrombocytes
white pulp houses WBCs
red pulp houses RBCs
spleen
splenic
artery
diaphragm
secretes thymosin
causes T lymphocytes to become immunocompetent
overlies the heart in infancy
increases in size and is most active in childhood
stops growing in adolescence and ultimately atrophies
Thymus
Simplest lymphoid organs; form a ring of lymphatic tissue around the pharynx
1) Palatine tonsils – either side of the posterior end of the oral cavity
2) Lingual tonsils – lie at the base of the tongue
3) Pharyngeal tonsil – posterior wall of the nasopharynx
4) Tubal tonsils – surround the openings of the auditory tubes into the pharynx
Tonsils
Be sure you can:
Lymphedema (Elephantitis)
caused by lymph blockage
Full transcript