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Beothuk

Social 10 Project - By: Khristine, Afrin, Judy, Vishali
by

Khristine Bautista

on 23 January 2014

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Transcript of Beothuk

Demasduit: One of the last Beothuk
Beothuk - Prior to Contact
Political Characteristics

In general, the 'leader' of the tribe is a male chief who is not only skillful and knowledgeable but also one who can inspire his tribe. The goal of the chief is to influence rather than boss around the tribe.

The chief of the Beothuks typically dressed different compared to other males.

European Contact
Beothuk
The Beothuk tried to avoid contact with the Europeans. Beothuk tried to make the Europeans go away by stealing or destroying The Europeans hunted and killed them. The Beothuks that weren't killed died because of starvation or from the European diseases.
Long Term Effects by the Contact With the Europeans
BY: Afrin P, Judy T, Vishali S, Khristine B
Extinction of the Beothuk
Bibliography
Social Characteristics

The tribal structure of the Beothuk people is very similar to a typical First Nation group. The males did things that require strength while women usually did more house-work.

Though work is split up like this, the Beothuk is an egalitarian group meaning that like any other first nation, they believe in equality amongst individuals.

Cultural Characteristics

Beothuks, according to John Peyton Jr., worshiped the sun and the moon.

Their main food source is fish as they are surrounded by a large mass of water. They focused on creating their own hunting materials.

http://visitnewfoundland.ca/beothuk.html
Google Image Search
http://www.native-languages.org/beothuk.htm
http://www.heritage.nf.ca/aboriginal/images/teepees1.gif
http://nlarchaeology.files.wordpress.com/2012/11/beo.jpg
http://workingeffectivelywithaboriginalpeoples.com/aboriginal-peoples-the-beothuk-and-how-european-contact-led-to-their-extinction
https://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/settlement/kids/021013-2021.1-e.html
http://www.ucalgary.ca/applied_history/tutor/firstnations/arctic3.html
http://www.nativevillage.org/Archives/2013%20News%20Archives/APRIL%202013%20News/skraelingsvsvikings.jpg
http://www.heritage.nf.ca/exploration/images/hind_v2_96_600.jpg
http://o.quizlet.com/hpIwdw4f87lVA2O1Lx8Q-g_m.jpg

Loss of culture and language.
Loss of Culture
Impacts made by the Europeans on the Beothuk
When Beothuk chiefs were eliminated by the Europeans, tribes were not able to function properly. This could have possibly led to internal conflict between the Indigenous peoples.
Economic Characteristics

The Beothuks, generally, didn't participate in any trades between other tribes.

Red dots are the Beothuk sites.
Yellow dots are precontact archaelogy sites.
Economic Impacts
Political Impacts
Social Impacts
The Beothuks were benefited because the Europeans abandoned fish camps to collect ropes, nets, nails, and other metal tools. They transformed them into tools like arrowheads and hide scrapers.
Cultural Impacts
When the Europeans came to the island where the Beothuks were settled, conflict arose. The Europeans killed most of the Beothuk male population. The killing led to the decrease of the the tribes' hunters.
Stories Disappeared
Beothuks were forced to be driven inland by the Europeans. Having no food to eat, as they were not accustomed to the life inland, led to the deaths of some Beothuks.
When the Europeans came they were easily outnumbered. The Beothuks could have easily made them leave their territory, but some factors prevented it from happening.
The European muskets became more popular than the traditional weapons. They also built villages and defended them.
There was a conflict between the Europeans and the Beothuks. It started when Europeans arrived in Newfoundland. The Beothuks had not given a warm welcome to the European fishermen, because they did not like seeing strangers occupying their fishing grounds and destroying their forests. Nor did the Europeans like the Beothuks, because Beothuks made frequent raids to steal from the Europeans fishing stations. The Europeans even tried to establish friendly relationships with Beothuks, but that was unsuccessful. They began hunting and killing Beothuk. Tribal people were driven inland and many died without the access to fish. They were put into a position where they were forced from their traditional land and lifestyle into ecosystem that could not support them and that led to undernourishment and eventually starvation. The outcome of the conflict was the extinction of the aboriginal tribe.
The Conflict and Outcome
Tribal people were driven inland and many died without the access to fish. They were put into a position where they were forced from their traditional land and lifestyle into ecosystem that could not support them and that led to undernourishment and eventually starvation. The outcome of the conflict was the extinction of the aboriginal tribe.
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