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Elements of Drama

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by

Tiffany Ferch

on 13 November 2015

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Transcript of Elements of Drama

Theme
Repetition
a repeating gesture, phrase, or idea is SIGNIFICANT.
It is never a mistake when a playwright repeats something.
also called a "motif"
Elements of Drama
Plot
- the series of events that make up the story
Characterization
Main Characters
(Protagonists)
Setting
the place or type of surroundings where something is positioned or where an event takes place.
the place and time at which a play, novel, or film is represented as happening

Theatrical Tools
Script
Foundations of Drama
Plot
Acts
Scenes
Dialogue
Exposition
Rising Action
Climax
Falling Action
Resolution
Characterization
Theme
Setting
Foils
Main Character
Minor Character
Scenery
Stage Directions
Sound Effects
Theatrical Objects
Playwright
Script
Props
The play (thus, the plot) are divided into sections
Acts
Scenes
The plot moves forward through:
Dialogue
Minor Characters
Anne Frank
Katniss Everdeen
Thor
The Joker
Coach Sue
Miep Gies
Primrose Everdeen
Phil Coulson
Harley Quinn
Brittany S. Pierce
Physical Setting
Where is the action taking place?
Time Era
When does the action take place?
Scenery
a cave?
a garden?
a courtyard?
a forest?
a living room?
Stage Design - Sets

Stage Directions
Sound Effects
Birds chirping?
Woman screaming?
Cannons Booming?
Fiddle playing?
Door squeaking open?
What are the characters doing?
What should the audience be looking at?
When do the lights go out to signal a scene change?
1987?
1776?
1942?
1642?
Setting affects dialogue
Prisoners in Australia
Aliens are loose in the spaceship
The British are coming!
Foils
Peter Pan - Captain Hook
Harry Potter - Lord Voldemort
Dr.Jekyll - Mr. Hyde
Batman - Robin

*Foils can be either
major or minor characters

Props
Playwright
-Objects used on stage!

The apple is a prop!
"writer of the play" ... hmm.
The book of character lines that actors memorize in order to perform.

A script for movies is called a "screenplay"!

- Distinguish, make distinctive, mark, define, represent, detail, explain
* Defining characters is more than just
physical differences
Jeff Gerke of Plot Versus Character writes, "Part 1: Memorable Characters" builds character on the Shrek model: Ogres are like onions. Or in our case, wonderful characters for fiction are like onions. They're layered."
Things to consider:
Physical attributes:
Gender, race, age, attractiveness, body structure, clothing and style
Natural attributes:
Family, education and intelligence, gifts and talents, self-esteem, zeal, likeability, manner of speech, maturity
Core personality (16 different combinations):
-Extrovert or Introvert
-Sensing or Intuition
-Thinking or Feeling
-Judgement or Perception


Gerke, Jeff. Plot Versus Character. Cincinnati: Writer's Digest Books, 2010. Print.

Symbolism
something means more than meets the eye
found in setting, characterization, AND theme
color, language, costuming
Contrast
- strikingly different concepts, usually presented together.
found in characterization, plot, and theme.
commonly provides for theme concepts
example: foils and setting
Beauty of simplicity
Capitalism – effect on the individual
Change of power - necessity
Change versus tradition
Chaos and order
Character – destruction, building up
Circle of life
Coming of age
Communication – verbal and nonverbal
Companionship as salvation
Convention and rebellion
Dangers of ignorance
Darkness and light
Death – inevitable or tragedy
Desire to escape
Destruction of beauty
Disillusionment and dreams
Displacement
Empowerment



Injustice
Isolation
Isolationism - hazards
Knowledge versus ignorance
Loneliness as destructive force
Losing hope
Loss of innocence
Lost honor
Lost love
Love and sacrifice
Man against nature
Manipulation
Materialism as downfall
Motherhood
Names – power and significance
Nationalism – complications
Nature as beauty
Necessity of work
Oppression of women
Optimism – power or folly
Overcoming – fear, weakness, vice
Patriotism – positive side or complications
Power and corruption
Power of silence
Power of tradition
Power of wealth
Power of words


Pride and downfall
Progress – real or illusion
Quest for discovery
Quest for power
Rebirth
Reunion
Role of men
Role of Religion – virtue or hypocrisy
Role of women
Self – inner and outer
Self-awareness
Self-preservation
Self-reliance
Social mobility
Technology in society – good or bad
Temporary nature of physical beauty
Temptation and destruction
Totalitarianism
Vanity as downfall
Vulnerability of the meek
Vulnerability of the strong
War – glory, necessity, pain, tragedy
Will to survive
Wisdom of experience
Working class struggles
Youth and beauty

Emptiness of attaining false dream
Everlasting love
Evils of racism
Facing darkness
Facing reality
Fading beauty
Faith versus doubt
Family – blessing or curse
Fate and free will
Fear of failure
Female roles
Fulfillment
Good versus bad
Greed as downfall
Growing up – pain or pleasure
Hazards of passing judgment
Heartbreak of betrayal
Heroism – real and perceived
Hierarchy in nature
Identity crisis
Illusion of power
Immortality
Individual versus society
Inner versus outer strength
Full transcript