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Battle of the Somme

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Benita Patel

on 9 October 2013

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Transcript of Battle of the Somme

Battle of The Somme
By: Mishaal Sheikh, Benita Patel, Maham Hassan, Tahia Haque
The Beginning
Historical Facts
Significance
Canadian's
Involvement

Timeline and Location
July 1st - Nov 18th 1916
The Battle started at 7:30 a.m.
North of Somme river between Arras and Albert
Purpose
of the Battle
British wanted to divert Germans away from Verdun.
British goal to capture the town of Bapaume
Most concentrated use of aircraft
An attempt to end trench warfare
The Plan
Action Plan
Bayonets
Flame throwers
Grenades
Machine guns
Poison Gas
Rifles
Tanks
Weapons
This was a battle conducted and planned by Field Marshall Douglas Haig
Plan was to invade and takeover the German trenches
The shellings would cut the barbed wire entanglements, collapse the dig-outs and kill the occupants
Soldiers would load 30 kilograms of equipment, climb out of their trenches, walk to the German lines and capture the survivors.
Soldiers Involved
Forces
British - Mostly Untrained Volunteers.
Grouped by where they lived.
German Troops - Well trained professionals.
Commanders
General Sir Douglas Haig - BEF commander
Joseph Joffre - French commander in chief
General Erich von Falkenhayn - German commander (later replaced by Hindenburg and Ludendorff)
The BEF only gained 8 miles of ground on a 12 mile front
Allies advanced on a 25 mile front, 7 miles deep at its deepest
The Allies lost the battle and suffered many casualties
85% of the regiment in Newfoundland were killed
420,000 British, 200,000 French, 500,000 Germans, and almost 24,000 Canadians were killed.
Battle was horrific and left many scars in survivors
It was one of the bloodiest battle of WWI
Aftermath
Impact on Canada
Casualties
The First Attack
1,738,000, shells fired at the Germans, in 8 days
Destroy trenches and barbed wire.
Nearly 60,000 British casualties and 20,000 deaths on the first day, a world record still today
Soldiers loaded 30 kilograms of equipment, climb out of their trenches, walk to the German lines and capture the survivors.
With outbreak of war, demands for soldiers, horses, factory labours and farm labours
Casualty rate was high with more than 60,000 soldiers found dead
Income tax introduced to pay for war cost
Canadian Troops
By the end of 1916, 105,000 Canadians were part of the BEF
Assaulted on a 2,200 yard sector
Four divisions in total
Somme cost Canada 24,029 casualties
Impact on Canadians
Soldiers separated from family
Crops and transportation systems were ruined
Veterans returned home to unemployment
A German victory
Considered by German`s to be their victory
Germany developed new strategies and technologies
British unable to get what they wanted
Casualties:1.1 million
Fighting the Battle
Before the battle began, the allies bombarded the German forces with heavy artillery but turned out to be ineffective
When the ally forces marched forward to the battlefield, they were shot down by the German machine guns
After the war the allies lost more soldiers than the Germans
General Sir Douglas Haig
Joseph Joffre
General Erich von Falkenhayn
Interesting Facts
Quotes from the War
Frank Maheux was a lumberjack from Quebec Canada, and described the scene's to his wife.

"We were walking on dead soldiers... I saw poor fellows trying to bandage their wounds... bombs, heavy shells were falling all over them. Poor Angeline, it is the worst sight that a man ever wants to see." ~Frank Maheux

"All my friends have been either killed or wounded... My dear wife, it is worse hell here. For miles around, corpses completely cover up the ground. But your Frank didn't get so much as a scratch. I went to battle as if i had to cut wood with my bayonet. When one of my friends wad killed at my side, i saw red; some Germans raised their arms in surender, but it was too late for them. I will remember that all my life." ~Frank Maheux
Adolf Hitler fought in the Battle of the Somme and was wounded
This battle was fought half way through the war which made it very important
The tank was used for the first time in combat at the Battle of the Somme
In 1992, it was revealed that Indiana Jones the famous fictional character was taken prisoner by the Germans while serving in a Belgium unit on the Somme in 1916
Bibliography
First World War.com - Battles - The Battle of the Somme, 1916. (n.d.). First World War.com - A Multimedia History of World War One. Retrieved October 1, 2013, from http://www.firstworldwar.com/battles/somme.html
battle, t. e., 1916, i. N., 420, t. B., 000., 200, t. F., men, 0., et al. (n.d.). The Battle of the Somme. History Learning Site. Retrieved October 1, 2013, from http://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/somme.html
BBC - History - World Wars: Battle of the Somme: 1 July - 13 November 1916. (n.d.). BBC - Homepage. Retrieved October 1, 2013, from http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/worldwars/wwone/battle_somme.shtml
ARCHIVED - The Battle of the Somme - Oral Histories of the First World War: Veterans 1914-1918 - Library and Archives Canada. (n.d.). Bienvenue au site Web Bibliothèque et Archives Canada / Welcome to the Library and Archives Canada website. Retrieved October 1, 2013, from http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/first-world-war/interviews/025015-1410-e.html
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